Take the 2-minute tour ×
Martial Arts Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students and teachers of all martial arts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to Wushu, and I've read some stuff on the web about it, but I still don't understand a lot of things, for example:

Is Tao lu the name of the northern Kung Fu style? Or is it a general name for a series of movements (routine), like those from the Wushu championships?

Is Chang Quan the same thing as Tao lu?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Taolu means "form" or "routine" in Mandarin in the same way that kata means "form" or "routine" in Japanese.

Chang Quan means "long fist". Originally, this was probably a distinct style, but came to mean a general category of Northern Chinese martial arts that includes styles like Cha Quan, Mizong Quan, and Shaolin Quan. In general, you can tell that a phrase refers to a Chinese martial arts style by the designation Quan, which translates to "Fist". Quan in this context is a shortening of Quan Fa which translates "Fist Method", and therefore refers to a style of martial arts.

Chang Quan contains many Taolu ("forms"), but also many things besides forms. I risk digression, so I will stop while I'm ahead.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, thanks a lot. So Chang Quan is for all northern wushu, and Nan Quan for Southern? –  ViniciusPires Feb 9 at 23:59
1  
Bei Chuan (also spelled Pei Quan) is northern shaolin. Nan Chuan is southern shaolin. Chang Chuan is "long fist", and there are many styles that are considered chang chuan. Also keep in mind that many southern styles also contain long-fist, yet they don't belong under the Chang Chuan umbrella. For example, Choy Lay Fut. So the phrase "Chang Chuan" can refer to either the martial art system or to a quality of techniques within the martial art. –  Steve Weigand Feb 10 at 5:54
    
Wow, thanks a lot, Steve :) –  ViniciusPires Feb 14 at 14:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.