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During sparring in Muay Thai, I occasionally receive hook-punches (even straight punches) where the corner/edge of the glove makes solid contact with an eye of mine. I can feel that my eye is sore for quite a long time after these hits. I am wondering whether these impacts are dangerous for my eyes. Do they pose a risk of gradual build up of damage that accumulates or risk of an instantaneous problem? I am concerned about non-cosmetic damages.

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Please go and talk with a medical doctor and take any advice your read on the Internet with a large stack of salt. –  Sardathrion May 3 at 11:41
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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician.

You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles:

Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. "The ocular complications of boxing" Ophthalmology Journal . 1987 Jun;94(6):587-96.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3627707/

And

Corrales G, Curreri A. "Eye trauma in boxing." Clin Sports Med. Journal. 2009 Oct;28(4):591-607, vi. doi: 10.1016/j.csm.2009.07.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/19819404/?i=23&from=/15665199/related

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Detached retina is a common boxing problem. It involves the retinal tissue at the back of the eye detaching - it can lead to permanent blindness. If you start to see flashes of light, or fuzzy eyesight, or "greyness" at the edges of your vision, you should see a doctor right away (within 24 hours).

It is more prevalent if you are already short sighted (due to the eye shape being stretched long).

Your eye doctor will also often be checking your retinas at check ups, so you can ask if you're particularly at risk based on what they see going on with your body.

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