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6

It is said that the first female instructor was Takako Kunigoshi. She was one of the first women to train under Ueshiba Sensei and started in January 1933 at what is now the Hombu Dojo. She trained there with another woman, but I don't know her name. Later she was asked to teach self-defense to other women. More information can be found here and here


5

First off, let me just say that I have a different view than most people – I don't believe a technique is correct because your movements match your instructor; I believe a technique is correct because you can break it down into its bare principles and apply it. Differences in size can be understood from the point of view of handicapping yourself during ...


4

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


4

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


4

It is borrowed/taken from various other arts (rifle/bayonet, spear(yari), and specific jo arts) with the founder of Aikido then blending/creating his "Aiki jo" art. Stan Pranin of Aikido Journal (formerly AikiNews) has written: The exact origins of the Aiki Jo remain somewhat of a mystery. Some have found traces of Morihei Ueshiba’s jo movements in ...


4

"Meditation, breathing, or visualization" practice will not help with what is essentially a failure of physicality and technique. Technique usually improves with in-class practice, but physicality requires out-of-class work to develop for most adults who are not genetically gifted. You must attain a basic level of athleticism--that is, physical strength, ...


4

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


2

Break falls are a good way for the students to learn to practice cooperatively and safely. They let the person executing the offensive technique push through it in a way that should work against an untrained opponent unfamiliar with using the fall as an escape, so it's a useful basic fighting skill for both people. Break falls are also a form of ...


2

My Aikido instructor has explained that the position you are referring to, if I'm not mistaken, is the most effective position to be in before doing any kind of forward strike with a bokken. It is called Jodan and it is a compromise between having the bokken far behind your head creating an offensive-focused power attack (being more strength oriented), and ...


2

According to "just another judo page", the first woman judoka was Sueko Ashiya, who started training in 1893, which (if true) would be 11 years after the official founding date of the art: First female Judo students started to train in Kodokan in late years of 19th century. First Kodokan female student was Sueko Ashiya in 1893 and joshi-bu (woman's ...


2

Not enough rep. to comment on other answers, so I have to make another. I agree with the answers of @JackBNimble and @Tomas when they make this distinction. One can add that the numbering of the techniques was invented by the studens of O'sensei, AFAIK he himself never used this naming system. Having said that, I teach that nikyo omote should still feel ...


1

In aikido, this is apparently called a "katate (single-handed) sokuten (cartwheel)" ukemi. Reference: http://suigetsukan.org/aikido/aikido-techniques-list/ Also, in Bujinkan ninjutsu, they refer to this as a "katate oten" ukemi. Reference: http://www.taijutsu.org.vt.edu/kihon.htm There may be other names for it as well, depending on the martial art.


1

Yes, I believe this is called, "zempo ukemi". Note that this is not "zempo kaiten ukemi". The "kaiten" part means rolling, and without rolling, you simply have "zempo ukemi". I didn't find much on the subject on the web. There is this page which you can send to Google Translate: http://escuelakuroobi.wordpress.com/2012/02/09/155/ It describes the Zempo ...


1

These Japanese "masters" sound like losers. When you're too old to compete, you can still spar and give back to the art by coaching. When you're too old to spar, you can still hang around the gym to give pointers and be friendly. You can still train to be fit and in condition. The idea that you'll reach your pinnacle of fitness and then need to quit is ...


1

From my understanding, and this is an un-sourced comment from my instructor (Aikikai), the jo represents a rifle/bayonet combo. If you consider that O-Sensei developed Aikido during various wars (largely formalized pre-WW2), this makes a lot of sense. However, I have no sources, so this is faith in my instructor on my part, and pure speculation for the ...


1

Takako Kunigoshi is a possibility; she started training in 1933. Edith Margaret Garrud started studying Judo in 1899; combine that with Dr. Liepmann's answer below, and it appears that women started studying Judo in both Japan and Europe at about the same time, which is somewhat surprising.


1

Part of the problem is that there is no original Japanese version of The Art of Peace, since John Stevens' book is a collection of Ueshiba Morihei's quotes from various sources. At best, I think you could try to find Japanese versions of other books by him, but I haven't been able to find any resources that suggest they contain the original Japanese version ...


1

there were 2 other creators of krav maga (beside Imi L) , who were aikido black belts, so thats why you can see so many similarities. Edit (was posted as secondary answer): Eli Avikzar and Rafi Algrisi ( the two other aforementioned krav maga creators) both had black belts in aikido and judo. Elis Bio: http://www.wincol.ac.il/lp/kami-eli Cant find any ...


1

I had very good experience with a short (under 10 minutes) routine based on the Five Tibetan Rites: First Rite Stand erect with arms outstretched...spin around until you become slightly dizzy. Second Rite Lie full length on rug or bed... Raise the feet until the legs are straight up. If possible, let the feet extend back a bit over the ...



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