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9

I don't have medical studies, but I can at least point you in the right direction of what to look up, based on kinesiology and adult biology. Tendon Plasticity "Tendon Plasticity" (Viscoelastic tissue) - Tendons work somewhat like rubber bands - they have some stretch to them, but if you over-stretch them, just like a rubber band, it ends up loose and ...


8

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


8

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


7

Virtually all of the martial arts use the hands in some way. Even Taekwondo, which uses mostly kicks during sparring, will use the hands to block and punch. Whereas, grappling arts use the hands to grab onto the gi or wrists or whatever. It's not uncommon in Brazilian Jiujitsu or Judo to sprain your pinky and ring fingers due to the fact that your grip ...


6

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


6

My advice is to just try it. You probably have a backpack. And you probably know how to do a front shoulder roll. Give it a try. See how it changes the way things work. Ask yourself whether or not you can modify it to roll better. Safety is a concern always, no matter what type of breakfall you're performing. So approach things slowly, with little extra ...


6

"Dangerous" is relative. In most cases, you won't sustain much harm by doing so, although the items in your backpack might get crushed. I have had it explained to me before by my former teachers (jujitsu and Bujinkan) that this is one of the reasons some of the defenses involve turning a flip to escape from a hold rather than a roll, because it prevents you ...


5

"Meditation, breathing, or visualization" practice will not help with what is essentially a failure of physicality and technique. Technique usually improves with in-class practice, but physicality requires out-of-class work to develop for most adults who are not genetically gifted. You must attain a basic level of athleticism--that is, physical strength, ...


5

They make parkour backpacks that are designed to be able to be rolled over. Unfortunately the pockets are tiny. If you've got things like say, clothes in your backpack, it would make your roll softer. Edit: Check out this link: http://ultimateparkourgear.com/parkour-backpacks/ You can also try wearing your backpack backwards XD


5

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


5

Doesn't everyone have problems with this technique. It takes some persistence but given the nature of effective application, not something one wishes to train often. Some words from me to help. Although words have different kinaesthetic interpretations for different people, but I will try. Firstly, in order to achieve Yonkyo (a pressure point), one must ...


4

In Aikido, the practice of ukemi, beyond the obvious fitness' reasons, has 2 reasons: allow the tori to perform techniques without restraint. Technically, the technique is as good as it unbalances uke. A good uke allows tori/shite to focus a bit more on the technique rather than the safety of his partner. The second reason is less obvious and more ...


4

My advice would be like Steve Weigand's: give it a try. But start by putting something soft into your backback, like a pillow or some folded towels, and also be conscious of the possibility that clips or zip-pulls on your pack could damage the surface of tatami. Next, try and get a sense for the direction in which you are rolling. For instance, in practice, ...


4

Limbo Haven't gotten really deep into ukemi, but it seems like if you made it a game like limbo, that would be pretty fun for kids. Hold a broom-stick pretty high at first, have them forward roll underneath it. Then lower it as they progress. Then start with it low and have them roll over it. Raise the bar as they progress. This could probably be done ...


3

A number of techniques have the explicit purpose of crashing the attacker's head into the ground. Done well, that is the only path available for attacker. This is not the kind of technique that I would ever want to receive twice without some kind of safety built-in. A number of things get done to make sure you can practice: Receiver lets go early so the ...


3

Yes, ukemi is a baseline necessity for practicing techniques, and obviously necessary to practice throwing techniques, but there are many applications past this: Aikido ukemi practice is a crucial aspect in developing the 'soft/supple body' necessary for high-level practice/utilization. Not just how to fall safely, but how to conserve and efficiently ...


3

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...


3

In the aikido context, misogi is usually used to refer to activities aimed at spiritual purification. For instance, if you end your training session with a breathing exercise in seiza, that is probably misogi... you're settling your mind, body and spirit, drawing in fresh air and exhaling impurity. However, like a lot of aikido practice, misogi exercises ...


3

Suggest you review Patrick Parker's blog (I've linked to a post that is specific to teaching children; it references exercises & games to teach kids). Specifically he mentions How to get kids to slap when they fall and Children's falling exercises, but there is a lot there, and Parker-Shihan is probably the best aikido blogger out there.


3

if you ever forget to hold your chin on your chest when you fall, you'll smash your head on the ground after a fall, and you'll know why you learn ukemi. It HURTS. I've seen an olympians judoka (who have beeing intensively trained for most of his live) got to tears after failing an ukemi and hitting his head ... and when it happened, he stopped training ...


3

I practice traditional japanese karate. I broke my middle finger and had to have surgery. I still practice. I practice with another karateka who is missing his entire left arm and another karateka who is missing a hand. In traditional Okinawa karate-do, having a missing or non working limb makes no difference to the practitioner. PS. My friend who is ...


3

At my taijutsu dojo, the instructors teach basic ukemi to kids as young as seven. The way they approach it is to start by showing it in action with an advanced technique -- like, they'll do a rear sweep on a guy, then point out how that would have hurt if he didn't fall on his back properly, then teach the rear hard fall. So, just like teaching anything: ...


2

I felt kind of down when I first fractured a metacarpal - was worried how well it would heal, but several guys at the dojo reacted along the lines of "oh yeah you too", and in the end it was a bit of a non-event - few weeks' rest and eased back into it. Six months later it was an irrelevancy. Of course, some injuries are worse than others, but my real ...


2

Tenshin is doing an ayumi ashi step forwards followed by a small tenkan, moving offline and adjusting to face uke. It is the beginning footwork that is done in the aikikai version of yokomen uchi shihonage omote.


2

Touching the spine when the sword is raised is basic kihon waza. It insures alignment and helps practice the full arc and art of kokyu. We were always encouraged to do so to feel the effortless swing and affects of gravity that is halted by the lower body, not entirely by the arms. It is basic form. For true swordsmanship one would not strike this way as one ...


2

Not enough rep. to comment on other answers, so I have to make another. I agree with the answers of @JackBNimble and @Tomas when they make this distinction. One can add that the numbering of the techniques was invented by the studens of O'sensei, AFAIK he himself never used this naming system. Having said that, I teach that nikyo omote should still feel ...


2

In aikido, this is apparently called a "katate (single-handed) sokuten (cartwheel)" ukemi. Reference: http://suigetsukan.org/aikido/aikido-techniques-list/ Also, in Bujinkan ninjutsu, they refer to this as a "katate oten" ukemi. Reference: http://www.taijutsu.org.vt.edu/kihon.htm There may be other names for it as well, depending on the martial art.


2

Yes, I believe this is called, "zempo ukemi". Note that this is not "zempo kaiten ukemi". The "kaiten" part means rolling, and without rolling, you simply have "zempo ukemi". I didn't find much on the subject on the web. There is this page which you can send to Google Translate: http://escuelakuroobi.wordpress.com/2012/02/09/155/ It describes the Zempo ...


2

Break falls are a good way for the students to learn to practice cooperatively and safely. They let the person executing the offensive technique push through it in a way that should work against an untrained opponent unfamiliar with using the fall as an escape, so it's a useful basic fighting skill for both people. Break falls are also a form of ...


1

I understand exactly how you mean. For me there are on and off days where i could execute advance techniques on the first try, and then those days where i couldnt complete basic ones. Times when i get lost, i would just step back and take big and deep breathes and after that slapping both my cheeks lightly but strong enough to feel a short sharp pain and ...



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