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8

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


7

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


6

"Dangerous" is relative. In most cases, you won't sustain much harm by doing so, although the items in your backpack might get crushed. I have had it explained to me before by my former teachers (jujitsu and Bujinkan) that this is one of the reasons some of the defenses involve turning a flip to escape from a hold rather than a roll, because it prevents you ...


5

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


5

They make parkour backpacks that are designed to be able to be rolled over. Unfortunately the pockets are tiny. If you've got things like say, clothes in your backpack, it would make your roll softer. Edit: Check out this link: http://ultimateparkourgear.com/parkour-backpacks/ You can also try wearing your backpack backwards XD


5

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


4

It is borrowed/taken from various other arts (rifle/bayonet, spear(yari), and specific jo arts) with the founder of Aikido then blending/creating his "Aiki jo" art. Stan Pranin of Aikido Journal (formerly AikiNews) has written: The exact origins of the Aiki Jo remain somewhat of a mystery. Some have found traces of Morihei Ueshiba’s jo movements in ...


4

"Meditation, breathing, or visualization" practice will not help with what is essentially a failure of physicality and technique. Technique usually improves with in-class practice, but physicality requires out-of-class work to develop for most adults who are not genetically gifted. You must attain a basic level of athleticism--that is, physical strength, ...


4

My advice is to just try it. You probably have a backpack. And you probably know how to do a front shoulder roll. Give it a try. See how it changes the way things work. Ask yourself whether or not you can modify it to roll better. Safety is a concern always, no matter what type of breakfall you're performing. So approach things slowly, with little extra ...


4

Limbo Haven't gotten really deep into ukemi, but it seems like if you made it a game like limbo, that would be pretty fun for kids. Hold a broom-stick pretty high at first, have them forward roll underneath it. Then lower it as they progress. Then start with it low and have them roll over it. Raise the bar as they progress. This could probably be done ...


3

Suggest you review Patrick Parker's blog (I've linked to a post that is specific to teaching children; it references exercises & games to teach kids). Specifically he mentions How to get kids to slap when they fall and Children's falling exercises, but there is a lot there, and Parker-Shihan is probably the best aikido blogger out there.


3

A number of techniques have the explicit purpose of crashing the attacker's head into the ground. Done well, that is the only path available for attacker. This is not the kind of technique that I would ever want to receive twice without some kind of safety built-in. A number of things get done to make sure you can practice: Receiver lets go early so the ...


3

Yes, ukemi is a baseline necessity for practicing techniques, and obviously necessary to practice throwing techniques, but there are many applications past this: Aikido ukemi practice is a crucial aspect in developing the 'soft/supple body' necessary for high-level practice/utilization. Not just how to fall safely, but how to conserve and efficiently ...


3

In Aikido, the practice of ukemi, beyond the obvious fitness' reasons, has 2 reasons: allow the tori to perform techniques without restraint. Technically, the technique is as good as it unbalances uke. A good uke allows tori/shite to focus a bit more on the technique rather than the safety of his partner. The second reason is less obvious and more ...


3

if you ever forget to hold your chin on your chest when you fall, you'll smash your head on the ground after a fall, and you'll know why you learn ukemi. It HURTS. I've seen an olympians judoka (who have beeing intensively trained for most of his live) got to tears after failing an ukemi and hitting his head ... and when it happened, he stopped training ...


2

In aikido, this is apparently called a "katate (single-handed) sokuten (cartwheel)" ukemi. Reference: http://suigetsukan.org/aikido/aikido-techniques-list/ Also, in Bujinkan ninjutsu, they refer to this as a "katate oten" ukemi. Reference: http://www.taijutsu.org.vt.edu/kihon.htm There may be other names for it as well, depending on the martial art.


2

Break falls are a good way for the students to learn to practice cooperatively and safely. They let the person executing the offensive technique push through it in a way that should work against an untrained opponent unfamiliar with using the fall as an escape, so it's a useful basic fighting skill for both people. Break falls are also a form of ...


2

Yes, I believe this is called, "zempo ukemi". Note that this is not "zempo kaiten ukemi". The "kaiten" part means rolling, and without rolling, you simply have "zempo ukemi". I didn't find much on the subject on the web. There is this page which you can send to Google Translate: http://escuelakuroobi.wordpress.com/2012/02/09/155/ It describes the Zempo ...


2

Not enough rep. to comment on other answers, so I have to make another. I agree with the answers of @JackBNimble and @Tomas when they make this distinction. One can add that the numbering of the techniques was invented by the studens of O'sensei, AFAIK he himself never used this naming system. Having said that, I teach that nikyo omote should still feel ...


1

These Japanese "masters" sound like losers. When you're too old to compete, you can still spar and give back to the art by coaching. When you're too old to spar, you can still hang around the gym to give pointers and be friendly. You can still train to be fit and in condition. The idea that you'll reach your pinnacle of fitness and then need to quit is ...


1

Part of the problem is that there is no original Japanese version of The Art of Peace, since John Stevens' book is a collection of Ueshiba Morihei's quotes from various sources. At best, I think you could try to find Japanese versions of other books by him, but I haven't been able to find any resources that suggest they contain the original Japanese version ...


1

there were 2 other creators of krav maga (beside Imi L) , who were aikido black belts, so thats why you can see so many similarities. Edit (was posted as secondary answer): Eli Avikzar and Rafi Algrisi ( the two other aforementioned krav maga creators) both had black belts in aikido and judo. Elis Bio: http://www.wincol.ac.il/lp/kami-eli Cant find any ...


1

From my understanding, and this is an un-sourced comment from my instructor (Aikikai), the jo represents a rifle/bayonet combo. If you consider that O-Sensei developed Aikido during various wars (largely formalized pre-WW2), this makes a lot of sense. However, I have no sources, so this is faith in my instructor on my part, and pure speculation for the ...



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