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12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


12

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


9

Short answer: just ask. Explain your previous training to the sensei (without bragging*). He/she will make the decision. At the very least I think they would be glad to show off their skills even if they will not teach you right away. They should be willing to preview the curriculum enough for you to make the decision to join or not based on what you ...


9

Kotegaeshi (小手返し etimology) is a supinating wrist lock and is generally translated as "wrist throw". The throw works on the manipulation of the wrist, which turns the fore-arm, then the shoulder, then the whole body. If tori's hand is supporting uke's wrist, then the twist will be much lessen. This means that there is less pressure/pain on the wrist itself. ...


8

The exceptionally unusual Aikidoka Tetsu Yamazaki, who seems to have developed his own form of non-Shodokan helmeted aikido restricted sparring, seems to execute a throw that I've seen taught in aikido as gedan-ate (or possibly an aiki-otoshi variant) at 0:14 of this video. Note the fact that it's been taught to me in judo as sukui-nage or tani-otoshi, I've ...


7

Nearly all forms of aikido are predicated on avoiding any possibility of pressure-testing their skills against resisting opponents in free-sparring or competitive environments. Nearly all practitioners stick to demonstration and practice with cooperative partners. From this it naturally follows that few aikidoka will be caught on camera trying to apply their ...


7

From my own experience, a match between judo/aikido starts at a distance doing Aikido and as soon as the distance closes, switching to judo. I have no link to videos as I never bothered filming any. However, this is what Tomiki found when he started to introduce Judo randori style play into Aikido: his students (who all knew some Judo) would automatically ...


7

You may see this as disruptive, and you may feel anxiety as a result. Provided they are respecting your commands in general I would strongly suggest that you don't worry about it. Going off on tangents while doing one on one training or drills is important - this type of experimentation can lead to the students learning new applications for moves, and just ...


5

I totally understand your problem I have had similar problems and often with people who are of the same grade as me and sometimes even students of a lower grade than myself. I would suggest perhaps splitting the class up, let the higher grades that cause confusion use one half of the dojo to do more advanced practice and you take the lower grade students ...


5

That older tiny guy is right but his answer is not helpful. He was showing you the end game but did nothing to get you there: The "secret" is of course to train. A lot. You might benefit from Tomiki's randori-ho system. It is an essential part of the shodokan (昭道館合気道) system that he created. In a nut shell, it helps one take a collection of kata and make ...


5

No. He is not using aiki-jo - at least as I understand it. I've studied aiki-jo for several years, and I've done my best to learn what I can of related jo arts (SMRJ) I'm not going to claim that I'm an expert, or even that I'm competent, but what he is doing does not resemble what I do, the books, tapes or teachers I've studied. His wrist position is ...


5

In the videos you provided, it seems that his staff, standing up, is about shoulder height. In Japanese and Okinawan arts, that would make it more of a Jo staff than a Bo staff, which is usually a few inches taller than the wielder. While I am not well versed in Aikido, I am somewhat familiar with the Jo from years of karate and Okinawan kobudo training, and ...


5

A good coach does not need to be better than his students but they need to understand how to make their students better. It is not easy but I feel that this is what you are lacking. I would allows the senior grades to train with each other for some of the session time: during that time, you tell them to do a kata such as the kaishiwaza or all variations on ...


4

You should focus on your basics movements, lines of balance, and how to generate power. First, your basic movements (the ones you do at the start of the class) are there because they are used everywhere. Any technique will use a basic move, or a slight variation of a basic move. If you cannot see it, ask someone. Second, the lines of balance are ...


4

If you are still unfamiliar with the technique you need to focus on learning the basic choreography. It's no good focusing on your "Tanden" (center of gravity) if your footwork or grip is wrong. Once this becomes instinctive then is the time to move on to focusing on the "Tanden" The purpose of this is that you yourself should move as little as possible ...


3

I also train in TKD and though we don't train for grappling (locks, chokes, etc.) very often, we are told that against a stronger opponent, you may need to do something else to weaken their grip. (As Sardathrion explains in his answer). The weapon of choice is a kick or strike to the groin! You may find that there is a small but vital aspect of the lock ...


2

Below is a link pertaining to a 3 month white belt who used Kotagaeshi to defend himself. It goes with the adage that self defence is 80% confidence. Basically a lot of things will work from a lot of martial arts, it's having the presence of mind at the time when your adrenaline is pumping that counts in that context. It has controls, pins and throws, ...


2

Most of the techniques in aikido are based on creating an opening for you to manipulate/control your opponent through the use of leverage and/or pain. In order to do that you are going to have to get within arms reach of your opponent or literally toe to toe in some cases :). Aikido really shines when you can create that opening and use one of techniques ...


2

I'm usually performing a yonkyo immediately after a sankyo. I pull opponent's wrist up and twist it till it the tension is big enough (sankyo). Then I release my lock slightly, so that the opp's wrist un-twists and slides a bit down. Now this is the perfect staring point to apply a yonkyo! The advantage of this method is, that you don't have to see what ...


2

This webpage lists several Yosinkan dojo's in Japan, but the link to the Osaka dojo leads to a Japanse website with no translation. However, if Google translate is any good, there are 3 places they train: Beikomu gymnasium judo field, Amagasaki Nishinagasu cho 1-4-1 Budokan Hibiki, Toyonaka Hattorinishi cho 4-13-2 DaiSusumu building 5F, Chuo-ku, Osaka ...


2

I wouldn't say it is rude to ask, and you can always ask for an explanation for the rule. My original dojo had a similar rule (you had to be 6th kyu). The reason being, it takes a lot more effort to initially get someone up and going in weapons practice than it does in the normal empty hand practice. My instructor only wanted to take the time to teach ...


2

From a non-aikido perspective: I think the concept you are looking for is "sung". In Chinese, I think this is song1 (pinyin) and 松 (simplified Chinese). This is roughly translated as relaxation, but the concept has a springiness quality, unlike a wet noodle. First, an aside about structure. In a front stance, someone pushing on your front will have their ...


2

It really comes down to your style and sensei. In my form we focus on Kihon, which in itself has multiple translations. The focus is on basic of the basics so to answer your question is that you perform a kotegaeshi stretch during warm ups. The idea was to help show thumb placement and strengthen and stretch the wrist. We place the thumb at the base of the ...


2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCmucAiUXi4 This shows a karate/aikido student in a fight against an untrained opponent. He manages to "throw" his opponent with an Aikido style movement at 1:13. He loses his own balance in the process, and the fight immediately becomes a scramble on the ground. I am not convinced that a fight between two untrained ...


2

I study in the Bujinkan, and the instructor I've been working with and I worked through all three "scrolls" of the Gyokko-ryu, and one thing about all the locks and throws there is that while we teach the locks in isolation in order to get an understanding of them, in the kata you always do something to the person before applying the lock (usually some sort ...


2

Whatever you do in Aikido, the simple rule of thumb applies: never play fair! If your and your opponent's hands are similarly strong and you're performing your lock single-handed, than you have a very slight chance to prevail. In order to achieve the goal of your lock you have to: use both hands against the one of the opponent use your legs and body ...


1

I think it depends on how far off they're getting, and what they're doing in that tangent. If they are working with beginners and not working the techniques you/the instructor is showing then they are doing that student a dis-service (and themselves, but they are responsible for their own training). Even as a mid-level student (lots of time in, but I'm ...


1

The simplest approach I know is to have everyone change partners regularly. There is no confrontation necessary with this approach, you reduce the impact a poorly matched partner has on any one person's training, people get to practice on a variety of bodies, and it's better for social mixing. Also, the tangent problem (not always a problem, but when it ...


1

What I took from Aikido is to discover the least harmful way to respond to any attack, to subdue your opponent in the most complete and least harmful way possible, and to practice these responses so frequently that they become the automatic instinctive response to said attacks. I think it was intended to be almost like a non-lethal krav maga in a way, ...


1

One of the best aikido books I've read is Advanced Aikido jointly written by Phong Thong Dang and Lynn Seiser. There are very thorough descriptions and explanations of techniques which is a nice change compared to other books. Ideas such as Zanshin and mushin are discussed. It is very well written and is excellent for anyone who has progressed beyond ...



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