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22

What you're really asking for is insight into the strengths and weaknesses of Aikido pertaining to self-defense scenarios. Aikido uses a small number of throws, joint locks, submissions, and strikes. There are some holds and submissions done from the ground. A number of breakfalls are trained. There is some weapons training as well, notably the 4-foot Jo ...


9

Kotegaeshi (小手返し etimology) is a supinating wrist lock and is generally translated as "wrist throw". The throw works on the manipulation of the wrist, which turns the fore-arm, then the shoulder, then the whole body. If tori's hand is supporting uke's wrist, then the twist will be much lessen. This means that there is less pressure/pain on the wrist itself. ...


7

Short answer: just ask. Explain your previous training to the sensei (without bragging*). He/she will make the decision. At the very least I think they would be glad to show off their skills even if they will not teach you right away. They should be willing to preview the curriculum enough for you to make the decision to join or not based on what you ...


6

tl;dr Balance breaking, timing, and power/speed is what you are looking for. The answer depends what type of training you: kata, randori, or shihai. In kata, you are supposed to learn basic movement. As such your uke should help you and not hinder you. A quick word with them to ask "why is this not working?" should fix it. Although I suspect that you are ...


5

That older tiny guy is right but his answer is not helpful. He was showing you the end game but did nothing to get you there: The "secret" is of course to train. A lot. You might benefit from Tomiki's randori-ho system. It is an essential part of the shodokan (昭道館合気道) system that he created. In a nut shell, it helps one take a collection of kata and make ...


5

Doesn't everyone have problems with this technique. It takes some persistence but given the nature of effective application, not something one wishes to train often. Some words from me to help. Although words have different kinaesthetic interpretations for different people, but I will try. Firstly, in order to achieve Yonkyo (a pressure point), one must ...


4

My Sensei once told me that aikido looks different that it feels. In other words you see a choreographed routine, I see someone practicing a potentially nasty joint lock that would make it difficult and painful for resisting opponent to continue. Now aikido is not without weakness, but to assume it an obsolete because it doesn't do as well as you would ...


4

My advice would be like Steve Weigand's: give it a try. But start by putting something soft into your backback, like a pillow or some folded towels, and also be conscious of the possibility that clips or zip-pulls on your pack could damage the surface of tatami. Next, try and get a sense for the direction in which you are rolling. For instance, in practice, ...


3

In the aikido context, misogi is usually used to refer to activities aimed at spiritual purification. For instance, if you end your training session with a breathing exercise in seiza, that is probably misogi... you're settling your mind, body and spirit, drawing in fresh air and exhaling impurity. However, like a lot of aikido practice, misogi exercises ...


2

Touching the spine when the sword is raised is basic kihon waza. It insures alignment and helps practice the full arc and art of kokyu. We were always encouraged to do so to feel the effortless swing and affects of gravity that is halted by the lower body, not entirely by the arms. It is basic form. For true swordsmanship one would not strike this way as one ...


2

Tenshin is doing an ayumi ashi step forwards followed by a small tenkan, moving offline and adjusting to face uke. It is the beginning footwork that is done in the aikikai version of yokomen uchi shihonage omote.


2

This webpage lists several Yosinkan dojo's in Japan, but the link to the Osaka dojo leads to a Japanse website with no translation. However, if Google translate is any good, there are 3 places they train: Beikomu gymnasium judo field, Amagasaki Nishinagasu cho 1-4-1 Budokan Hibiki, Toyonaka Hattorinishi cho 4-13-2 DaiSusumu building 5F, Chuo-ku, Osaka ...


2

From a non-aikido perspective: I think the concept you are looking for is "sung". In Chinese, I think this is song1 (pinyin) and 松 (simplified Chinese). This is roughly translated as relaxation, but the concept has a springiness quality, unlike a wet noodle. First, an aside about structure. In a front stance, someone pushing on your front will have their ...


1

One of the best aikido books I've read is Advanced Aikido jointly written by Phong Thong Dang and Lynn Seiser. There are very thorough descriptions and explanations of techniques which is a nice change compared to other books. Ideas such as Zanshin and mushin are discussed. It is very well written and is excellent for anyone who has progressed beyond ...


1

Most of the techniques in aikido are based on creating an opening for you to manipulate/control your opponent through the use of leverage and/or pain. In order to do that you are going to have to get within arms reach of your opponent or literally toe to toe in some cases :). Aikido really shines when you can create that opening and use one of techniques ...


1

I believe your question can be answered by considering the following variables: Your level of skill The number and skill of your opponents The circumstances in which the fight takes place Of course, if you pit two martial artists with the same amount of experience against each other, the one with most practical experience will most probably win. Notice ...



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