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I felt kind of down when I first fractured a metacarpal - was worried how well it would heal, but several guys at the dojo reacted along the lines of "oh yeah you too", and in the end it was a bit of a non-event - few weeks' rest and eased back into it. Six months later it was an irrelevancy. Of course, some injuries are worse than others, but my real ...


3

I practice traditional japanese karate. I broke my middle finger and had to have surgery. I still practice. I practice with another karateka who is missing his entire left arm and another karateka who is missing a hand. In traditional Okinawa karate-do, having a missing or non working limb makes no difference to the practitioner. PS. My friend who is ...


9

I don't have medical studies, but I can at least point you in the right direction of what to look up, based on kinesiology and adult biology. Tendon Plasticity "Tendon Plasticity" (Viscoelastic tissue) - Tendons work somewhat like rubber bands - they have some stretch to them, but if you over-stretch them, just like a rubber band, it ends up loose and ...


6

Virtually all of the martial arts use the hands in some way. Even Taekwondo, which uses mostly kicks during sparring, will use the hands to block and punch. Whereas, grappling arts use the hands to grab onto the gi or wrists or whatever. It's not uncommon in Brazilian Jiujitsu or Judo to sprain your pinky and ring fingers due to the fact that your grip ...


3

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...



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