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I can suggest Aikido Principles "Basic Concepts of the Peaceful Martial Art" from Stefan Stenudd. The author is an Aikikai instructor but I also found the book useful as a Kobayashi style practitioner. It is mostly about the basic concepts in Aikido, not the techniques. The spiritual side of Aikido has also been mentioned. For german readers, I can also ...


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I think it's worth noting that jō is sometimes translated to English as "cane". While it doesn't match up in shape and size to a classic European cane, it does match in purpose. Another interesting fact about the jō is that it's also the size of the haft of a farmer's spear: in the feudal period of Japan, a commoner couldn't keep a full-length yari, but was ...


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I am in an Aikikai federation and I have not seen any evidence of it. We have a senior student who will read some of Ueshiba's teachings in that area before we start class but that is really the extent of it.


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First, in iwama ryu we have lot of contacts with stabbing (tsuki) so it would be less dangerous to stab with blunt kisaki. Second, there are go no awase and shichi no awase which are parrying techniques, practitioner should parring in proper way, if he parry wrong he will punch on top of the opponent bokken on his blunt kisaki and instructor will hear that ...


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Forget machines, bench press, or any of that. You're not trying to become static or develop slow, crushing 'python' strength in aikido. Rather, you're trying to go for dynamism. You want to flow and crash. Fast, hard and weightless. Here are some real strength practices I can suggest as opposed to the regular "strength training" you'll find in any men's ...


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There is always a counter technik; also inside the Aikido (other than punching and kicking) For every technique there is a twin technique which could be used as counter, like ying yang principle. The concept is called Kaeshi waza. Of course I would not suggest to resist the sankyo grip if your opponent/partner tori has solid control over you, it might harm ...


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Though they come from similar bases, Aikido and Judo are designed for entirely different purposes. Judo was explicitly designed as a competitive grappling sport, grappling against other judo practitioners primarily within a dojo or competition hall, and it's techniques and training have expanded to fill this role. Aikido was designed to provide a mechanism ...



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