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15

This ritual is called Bao Quan (抱拳), literally meaning "Fist Wrapping", and is a common etiquette derived from (but not exclusive to) Chinese Martial Arts. It is not necessarily a bow, but rather a salute. Traditionally, this is practiced by: Standing upright, the body straight. Clenching the right fist. Straighten your left palm to have your four fingers ...


9

There are many reasons for this action. It is, by the way, not the opening movement of a form, but a salute, a ritualistic motion. Here are a few reasons: Closed hand is aggression, fight & open hand is peace. Cover aggression with peace to indicate that there is such a power within you but you choose not to use it. Closed hand is yang, open hand is ...


9

One application is to capture a punch. If you enter the puncher's space, there's an arm break and/or a relatively violent takedown similar to some silat takedowns. It can be a deflection and striking/throwing entry without any capturing or breaks. One application Attacker steps in with a right-hand punch. Defender outward-deflects punch using the right ...


5

I've studied Yang style Tai Chi for two years. There are some very simple applications for Single Whip: In the images above, the guy is facing forwards, imagine if the attacker was coming from behind. You start in Wu Chi and when they try to punch the back of your head, you step backwards into single whip, using the whip hand to very subtly deflect the ...


5

There are many applications, depending on what part of the single whip sequence one looks at. There is hooking and pull-down and push with the right hand at the beginning of the motion. Then there is a potential albeit well hidden elbow strike when turning around. Then there is a combination of a ward-off, pull-down and push, the end of which can be seen ...


2

In the system that I teach in, the left hand symbolizes the mind, the right symbolizes the body. We have three bows as you progress through training: For beginners, the hands are at the side in a fist to symbolize your mind and body are far apart. Roughly half way to Black Belt, hands together similar to the picture, however left hand fingers are straight ...


1

This hand posture is also found associated with the sho chiku bai (pine, bamboo, plum) formations as seen at this link: http://www.skski.net/sho-chiku-bai-mon.html. More details about that can be found there, as well. In Morihei Ueshiba's book on aikido talks about the sho chiku bai throughout its pages, but doesn't discuss the hand postures: ...


1

The fist is symbolic of fighting or war, the open hand is covering it showing that we come in peace, but are ready for war if that is what the other person wants or brings. The open hand with the fingers straight is also similar to an extended open hand ready to be shaken. With the fingers outstretched towards the other person it's basically showing that we ...


1

I think this is being over analysed. This is simply a courteous symbol of respect. All martial art instruction emphasises that conflict should be avoided wherever possible. I must admit that I find the idea of different expressions of respect dependent on grade a little bizarre.


1

Turns out my teacher was pondering the same question. What are some applications for Single Whip?. My teacher shows a variety of applications for single whip. The second video emphasizes how to use the "hook" portion of the single whip. (and stars me as the portly victim).



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