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19

Interesting question! The first ranking system in Japanese arts was a merit system based on menkyo or licenses. Essentially, you trained until you learned enough to earn a license recognizing your ability in that set of techniques or lessons. You may have a menkyo for each section of the syllabus (mokuroku), or you might have menkyo shoden, menkyo chuden, ...


10

This is an interesting question, there isn't really any one right answer. Asking them questions regarding their character is not really appropriate. They should have been training at a particular dojo for some time, and a lot should already be known about their character before they are invited to grade. Therefore asking character oriented questions at the ...


8

A third degree brown belt is the lowest level of brown belt, not the highest, and is thus the furthest from black belt. A black belt does also not denote an understanding of all the tenets of judo. A third-degree brown belt means that you're not a total novice to the art. Sometimes it means even less. Teddy Roosevelt was a tough guy who liked many combat ...


7

The requirements for blue belt vary from school to school. What is required at Roy Harris' academy is not what is required at Renzo Gracie's, Marcelo Garcia's, and so on. The Straight Blast Gym had a good article about how to view the goals of each belt progression. Here's the section on going from white to blue: White to Blue: The journey of white ...


7

Jigoro Kano first came up with the kyu/dan ranks in 1883 for Judo. The original belts were blue (6th kyu), white (5 and 4 kyu), brown (3, 2, and 1 kyu), and black for dan grades (10 ranks). The idea behind the system was to promote a quick reward/progression system and a way to identify your opponent's average skill in randori. After that, a myriad of ...


6

First, bear in mind that this will differ from dojang to dojang. Depending on your association (WTF or ITA for example) there may be a list of techniques you will have to master for each belt. If you are not affiliated with an association, your teacher will have a checklist of things he wants you to learn before each belt. Ask your teacher what the ...


5

I agree with the other answers about the technique varying, but wanted to add one more: Time and dedication. We like to say that a "black belt is a white belt who didn't quit" (this is not unique to us, it's a fairly common expression). We also talk about how when a new person enters the dojang it is impossible to tell if they will be one of the ones who ...


5

With Japanese forms, you'll find a greater emphasis placed on even the small things. That said, the method demonstrated to tie the aikido belt in that video is the same way I've been instructed to tie my belt in karate. The benefits of that method are: Presentation: the belt lays flat and looks neat Lack of distraction: because the belt stays tight, you ...


5

There is no official method since every school has different rules. However, it is quite standard to convert all the belts from the yellow up to a blue belt. This is because there is normally no sense in letting these former under-16 people fight against white belts. On the other side, if they are much better than a blue belt they will prove it quickly ...


4

"What does a black belt mean to you?" "What would it mean if you did not receive your black belt today?" "Are you ready to wear a black belt?" "What is the difference between you wearing a white belt and you wearing a black belt?" "Imagine you are in a fist fight - the other person has just started throwing the first strike, and you haven't started ...


4

Traditional Kung Fu doesn't have colored sashes, as they traditionally had the sole purpose of holding up the pants. For the most part, colored sashes are a Japanification of the ranking systems. Rank in traditional Kung Fu also doesn't follow the same general pattern as Japanese arts either, as titles are familial based, not rank based (sidi = younger ...


4

It is, and it takes a LONG time to reach. If you ever reach your 9th Dan, you get a red belt to wear. The white-red belt is gotten at the 6th Dan. But at this stage, you need to wait between 8 or 10 years between each test. And it's not automatically given to you ... the internal federation will only give the highest Dan to people who actually have an ...


4

In ITF Taekwon-do, the coloured belts are numbered from 10th kup (also gup) to 1st kup. Black belt grades are numbered from 1st degree (also dan) to 9th degree. In the organisation I'm a member of (P.U.M.A, in the UK), the colours used are: 10th: White 9th: Yellow stripe 8th: Yellow 7th: Green stripe 6th: Green 5th: Blue stripe 4th: Blue 3rd: Red stripe ...


3

Your club/school will probably have a promotional exam every few months, or every semester if it's a university program. That's a good time to watch (even if you are not ready to test) and get a good feel for what people have to learn and how good they have to be all the way up through the ranks, including dan ranks. (For a small school, you may have dan ...


3

When I tested for 1st Dan, I was asked to perform Gae Baek, which is the blackbelt pattern (kata for all the karate philistines - JK). In addition to that, I was asked to perform two additional colour belt patterns at random. In my case, Won Hyu and Hwaorang. Then came the demonstration of breaking techniques. I was allowed to choose my own technique and ...


3

In our dojo this is what we do for the Shotokan black belt exam (1st dan): We i.e. each student, does 15 different Kihon (or combination) that have been extracted from one of the katas used in the exam. In our dojo it is customary to choose one of the upper katas of this exam to extract the kihon. Typically it is Bassai dai. Each kihon is repeated 5 times. ...


2

For Aikido I was taught the same method as in the video, except that I start with the end hanging to the left instead of the right. I was told this is so rolling is more comfortable. The X tying version (starting with the middle of the belt on your stomach and wrapping around both directions simotaneously) is supposedly used by martial arts that don't do a ...


2

The most common question I've heard asked at my school is "what does being a black belt mean to you?" This question is very broad and open ended. It provides insight into how a person has evaluated oneself up to that point in time, and potentially what a person will do upon receiving one.


2

This is an inspiring article about belt rankings. http://www.minrec.org/wilson/pdfs/History%20of%20Belts%20and%20Ranks.pdf Speculative tradition proposes that belt colors (as indicators of rank) originated in a peculiar habit of washing all of one’s training clothes except the cloth belt. Thus as training progressed the initially white belt would ...


2

This is kinda an old post but I couldn't help but comment. What techniques should a white belt master to progress to blue belt? Well, I'm not sure that at the blue belt level you have "mastered" anything yet. However, at white belt you should focus on certain things to help your overall skill level progress efficiently. I fall into the Saulo camp for the ...


2

I like Juann and Wudang Kid's answers, but lets put some perspective on this. Every person that walks, for the first time, in a dojang or dojo wants to know what it takes to become a black belt and what it takes to know all the crazy things they see on TV or in the movies. Never mind the expense of promotion and some belt-factory schools, the question's ...


2

at the will machado club I go to, there is a syllabus for white to blue which broadly breaks down into Positional Drills (moving from position to position) Sweeps Armbars Armlocks Chokes Escapes Passes While there's set techniques for each of those that you need to know, the teaching involves many variations and setups. To me the difference between ...


2

Yes it is. It actually goes Black -> Red White -> Red Those Upper ranks tend to be more about service to the art.


2

To add to the (excellent) answers already provided: Black is an arbitrary color for an arbitrary level. This is why I've told people to be very, very dubious of special "black belt tracks." There are two reasons for this: First, "1 dan" (or its equivalent) is an arbitrary designation within the art. It indicates that you have learned whatever set of ...


2

Smartass Answer Here: TKD Belts Serious Answer Depends on the school/association. Some have over 10 colored belts before you even get to first degree black. Some have much fewer. An example: White Yellow 1st and 2nd Degree Green 1st and 2nd Degree Blue 1st and 2nd Degree Brown Black 1st Degree through 9th or 10th The fewer belts the school has, ...


1

You are correct. Red belts are the highest level that one could obtain, 9th Dan being the highest level a normal person could become and 10th Dan which is reserved for the Head of the foundation or Ex Heads.. Usually for 3rd DAN and above, any promotion would no longer be based solely on your technical skills, but by your contribution to the JUDO society. ...


1

Most Brazilian Jiujitsu schools do have children's ranks which automatically get turned into adult ranks when they turn 16. So a children's orange belt will become an adult's blue belt automatically at age 16. A children's green belt will automatically become an adult's purple belt at age 16. This is usually how it's done, but a teacher might decide to award ...


1

Forget about all the fancy techniques like chokes, sweeps, locks, armbars, etc. As a blue belt you are expected to know how to survive and not do stupid things such as pushing the person off you when mounted. Survival, that is all.



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