Hot answers tagged

8

I won't answer for classical, as it's a matter of personal opinion. Personally, I'd consider "canonical" just the two books written by O'Sensei: Budo Renshu: a book of aikido drawings illustrated by Morihei Ueshiba himself Budo Teachings of the Founder of Aikido (mainly photographs) (note: one listed author is Kisshomaru, but the content is most ...


5

"Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere" by Westbrook and Ratti and for Yoshinkan style "Total Aikido" by Gozo Shioda


4

A process cannot be understood by stopping it. Understanding must move with the flow of the process, must join it and flow with it. -- Dune, Frank Herbert I do not know of any books that do this, but you are better off watching Youtube videos, like this one, which describes heaven and earth. You're better off looking for 'heaven six' first, though. The key ...


3

If you had some training in classical jujitsu, then Hatsumi's book will work out just fine for you. He takes the hanbo / jo staff (3 or 4 foot staff) techniques entirely from the classical jujitsu arts that are contained under the umbrella of Bujinkan. You'll find a lot of overlap and similarity with what you already know from jujitsu regarding the footwork, ...


3

Yes there are treatises regarding Wrestling and Swordsmanship. As can be seen on ARMA's Master Ott's Wrestling: Hans Talhoffer (1443), Ms.Chart.A.558 (HK 20) Peter von Danzig, Cod.44 A 8 (Cod. 1449)(HK 42) Jud Lew, Cod.I.6.40.3 (HK 5) Paulus Kal ,Cgm 1507 Hans von Speyer, M.I.29 1491 (HK 43) Paulus Hector Mair, Mscr. Dresd. C 93/94 (HK 15, ...


3

Good foundations for Shodokan Aikido: Tetsuro Nariyama's Aikido Randori is the top one. Scott Allbright's Aikido and Randori is a close second.


3

Aikido Shugyo is also an excellent resource, containing both lots of anecdotes about Ueshiba Sensei as well as deep and well-explained insights from Gozo Shioda Sensei. And don't let the fact that it's writtem by the founder of Yoshinkan distract you -- there's not really anything specific to Yoshinkan in there.


2

Once I read a book about the Life of Morihei Ueshiba (though I don't remember the exact book's name...). I never thought of it as of a "canonical book", but if something is, it is this book - for me. I'd definitely take a look at The Secret Teachings of Aikido.


2

I can suggest Aikido Principles "Basic Concepts of the Peaceful Martial Art" from Stefan Stenudd. The author is an Aikikai instructor but I also found the book useful as a Kobayashi style practitioner. It is mostly about the basic concepts in Aikido, not the techniques. The spiritual side of Aikido has also been mentioned. For german readers, I can also ...


2

One of the best aikido books I've read is Advanced Aikido jointly written by Phong Thong Dang and Lynn Seiser. There are very thorough descriptions and explanations of techniques which is a nice change compared to other books. Ideas such as Zanshin and mushin are discussed. It is very well written and is excellent for anyone who has progressed beyond ...


1

Yes, you can definitely learn from a book. People in martial arts far too often deny that because they won't admit that that is exactly why people write books. As a lad, I learned three entirely different systems from books so I knew the curriculum before I showed up for the first class. That said, eventually you'll find it valuable to train with other ...


1

I would need more information on what you mean by forms and what you are try to accomplish. If it is how to fight with a knife/Tanto, there are many good styles. I am partial to some of the Israeli commando forms. If you are looking for defense I can comment on this a little. I have trained in Aikido for many years in the US, Canada and Japan. When I asked ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible