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18

This ritual is called Bao Quan (抱拳), literally meaning "Fist Wrapping", and is a common etiquette derived from (but not exclusive to) Chinese Martial Arts. It is not necessarily a bow, but rather a salute. Traditionally, this is practiced by: Standing upright, the body straight. Clenching the right fist. Straighten your left palm to have your four fingers ...


10

There are many reasons for this action. It is, by the way, not the opening movement of a form, but a salute, a ritualistic motion. Here are a few reasons: Closed hand is aggression, fight & open hand is peace. Cover aggression with peace to indicate that there is such a power within you but you choose not to use it. Closed hand is yang, open hand is ...


10

Bowing in Kung-Fu will take various different forms; not surprising as there are hundreds, if not thousands, of individual styles from various families and various regions all throughout China. In China, bowing (especially the traditional kowtow) serves as a sign of reverence. Modernly (following Imperialisms decline in China), the kowtow has been replaced ...


2

In the system that I teach in, the left hand symbolizes the mind, the right symbolizes the body. We have three bows as you progress through training: For beginners, the hands are at the side in a fist to symbolize your mind and body are far apart. Roughly half way to Black Belt, hands together similar to the picture, however left hand fingers are straight ...


1

This hand posture is also found associated with the sho chiku bai (pine, bamboo, plum) formations as seen at this link: http://www.skski.net/sho-chiku-bai-mon.html. More details about that can be found there, as well. In Morihei Ueshiba's book on aikido talks about the sho chiku bai throughout its pages, but doesn't discuss the hand postures: ...


1

The fist is symbolic of fighting or war, the open hand is covering it showing that we come in peace, but are ready for war if that is what the other person wants or brings. The open hand with the fingers straight is also similar to an extended open hand ready to be shaken. With the fingers outstretched towards the other person it's basically showing that we ...


1

I think this is being over analysed. This is simply a courteous symbol of respect. All martial art instruction emphasises that conflict should be avoided wherever possible. I must admit that I find the idea of different expressions of respect dependent on grade a little bizarre.



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