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17

Sparring should emphatically not end in you being beaten bloody, no matter the sport. Sparring is a contact activity, and you should expect to take some knocks, but it is also an activity founded on control and trust. There's an important difference between toughening up and learning to take a hit and actually being harmed. This is doubly important for ...


12

If the students are going too hard on the beginners, the instructor either don't care or has lost control of the class. It's his or her responsibility to make sure everybody is safe. Most good schools ease their beginners into sparring. They start of with some light sparring, and then progress from there. Even pro fighters spar easy a lot of the time, as ...


10

Try talking to them; You're sparring so they working on their toughness is dumb; toughness is not a skill that increases with practice*; it's a deteriorating factor. Being tough is a good quality to have, but it should never be someone's primary way to win. It's a backup. During sparring, where you are trying to improve, you should be working on (placing) ...


8

One of the eternal truths about martial arts is that you're going to get hit. And another eternal truth is that sometimes you're going to get hit hard. So it's a good thing to learn to take hits. Being struck in the belly is a good way to learn to tighten the abs and discover that they are an effective shield when they are properly developed and trained. A ...


8

It sounds like you are fighting people tougher than you, a lot of the time this means you can be faster. Every time they throw a punch, do a quick strike to spots like the side of their arm, in between the tricep and bicep. Strike to their armpits. Strike upwards to their lats and if you can, down on their trapezius muscle. Also try striking the inside of ...


8

I would advocate that you throw the boil & bite mouthguard away and spend the money to get a properly moulded one from your dentist or orthodontist. The advantage these have is that they are moulded very closely to your teeth, and they are very hard to dislodge. Consequently you don't end up distracted by it while sparring and don't end up gagging from ...


7

This reminds me of a training technique my old track and field trainer sometimes used for condition training. If you get short(er) breaks then you'll be forced to run (or in this case fight) while you are more fatigued than usual which indeed is good for condition training. It will also teach you to "keep up" your coordination and technique while ...


6

In Tae Kwon Do, we definitely are trying to win, but we aren't going to kill each other over it. When I first started sparring, I got kicked quite often, and thought, "Oh Jesus this hurts" but after a while, I got used to it. Sparring hurts when you first start, but you get used to it. If you find that you keep getting hurt, something is wrong. If you find ...


6

Circle them in the direction of their weaker hand. So if they're right-handed, circle counter-clockwise. This makes it very difficult for them to go toe-to-toe with you and they'll have to concentrate on more technical boxing. Think Mohamed Ali versus Mike Tyson. Also, the old chestnut about float like a butterfly, sting like a bee applies: close the gap, ...


6

I concur with the previous answers - punching an immoveable surface is bad unless your knuckles and wrists are already conditioned. For example I frequently do single-knuckle strikes on doorway framings - while I do it considerably harder than the normal person I still don't do it with anything near the power I would use on a soft target. I would strongly ...


6

The hands are taped in both boxing and MMA to protect the hand/wrist. A fighter might hold back and not use his/her full striking power when not using handwrappings in order to avoid injury. So if the fight was agreed to be bareknuckle without tape, being allowed to use tape would be advantageous.


5

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


5

What you are describing in your question sugggests to me that this is indeed a bad club, or at least a bad trainer. Let's Pitting a beginner against a guy with years of experience is only a good idea if the trainer trusts the more experienced guy to hold back and not beat the beginner up. The goal should be to show the beginner where he makes mistakes, ...


5

In a perfect world, your mouth guard should fit for the life of the guard if properly molded in the first place. It is extremely common, however, to have a mouth guard that doesn't properly retain its shaping, mostly because of a relaxation or remodeling of the guard from wear, being cleaned with too high of heat, or simply from never having been properly ...


5

There's nothing wrong with using focus mitts for technique or cardio. Although, you'll have to get the technique right first before you use the mitts for a high intensity workout. Probably what these trainers are trying to say is that it's easier to have a fighter wail on a heavy bag for cardio than to punch themselves out on focus mitts. They're likelier ...


5

First some background on Taekwondo. There are several organizations that certify ranking in Taekwondo. They all kind of look like each other, because they share the same exact roots. They branched off for different reasons, sometimes political, sometimes having to do with the emphasis of various techniques over other techniques, and other reasons. But they ...


5

Conditioning and muscle endurance are the attributes which allow you to continue executing proper technique after the first few moments of a fight or bout. All the slick technique in the world is useless if you're too tired to execute that technique. Technique is important, but it tends to degrades rapidly as one tires. Being in condition for boxing allows ...


4

In an attempt to answer this question objectively, and on topic: According to A Buzzle.com Article on the Effects of Music on the Brain, music has the following effects on the brain: Increases Concentration Levels, Improves Memory: It is known that music helps increase your concentration levels. [...] Research has shown that the silence between two ...


4

The boil and fit mouth-guard, once it's fitted properly, should not loose it's fit, especially not that soon. Some wear and tear can cause it to become a little loose over time. I've had mine for a couple of months and it still is well fitted to my upper teeth. Mine is one of those clear rubbery ones that cost like 2 bucks. You might want to try fitting ...


4

You'll likely need a couple pairs of gloves. most gyms require a certain size for sparring. Probably 16oz. This tends to be the size required for boxing and muay thai fights as well. For hitting a bag, i like to use light gloves and that is how my muay thai instructor taught me. Some people like to use the 18oz for training so that when they fight, ...


4

When Mike Tyson knocks you out in the first round, is it because you don't have enough endurance or because your technique failed you? I would argue that endurance is more important than technique when the fight goes the full distance. Having good technique is one thing, but it's your endurance that keeps you from making mistakes when you get tired. And ...


4

I want to be able to be prepared against any kind of opponent. You are looking for a unicorn there. No martial art whatsoever is able to do that. There is no ultimate fighting art. That said, most martial arts (McDojo excluded) can give you an edge in self defence. It will shift the odds in your favour which is a good thing. However, self defence is ...


3

I'm not a boxer, I have almost zero boxing experience, but I've seen several valid approaches to footwork during the jab. The two I've been shown most commonly are a Jack Dempsey-style jab with a heavy forward step and a jab with no step, pivoting the front foot on the ball of the foot. I can't speak to the jabs you've seen or the examples you describe, but ...


3

It's not good for your body. It's also not good in general for your mental development. Walls and people don't move the same way. People yield* when they get hit. Walls do not. Attach heavy pillows to the wall with velcro or glue or nails or something. Then punch those instead. It's a start, until you find something better to punch. YIELDING - the ...


3

"I'm trying to diet and exercise properly to reach my low body fat goal. (..)" That said, boxing is the way to go. The workout is quite intense, because you need to build stamina in order to box properly. "Also, I want to learn some basic self defense" For self defense, i would include Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu as well, since it has proven its effectiveness ...


3

You seem already more than fit enough. Everyone will have their own weaknesses, be it strength, stamina, balance, flexibility, or whathaveyou. All the boxing or kickboxing programs I've seen have warmup and conditioning parts to their classes/sessions. They involve rope jumping, calisthenics, shadow boxing, bag hitting, stretching, etc. Doing those, over ...


3

This is also a question people struggle with when wanting to return to training after a break, where it can be a bigger problem because going back in at their old level means a certain intensity from their peers. Regardless of whether taking up something new or returning to an old activity, the bottom line is participation and determination. However tough ...


2

Boil and Bite are ok, better then nothing. But like others have mentioned, not as good as a custom fit one you can get from your dentist. Or from a company like smart guard, or one of the many others around. My first mouth guard was a top of the line shock doctor, which are arguably one of the best brands of boil and bite. it fit ok, but came loose ...


2

It depends on what martial art you are training for. Which one are you doing? Shortening the rest intervals is a great idea because it makes you get used to fighting with less energy, thus you get stronger and accustomed (sharper under more strain) to it. I would highly suggest doing this. Though, I would still suggest doing at least one practice a week ...


2

It sounds like you went to a terrible club. They should never have allowed you, as a beginner, to spar without proper protection. In boxing, you should wear headgear, kidney protector, and mouthpiece. You should wrap your hands properly and use sparring gloves (12oz or more). Additionally, I wear a vest-style chest protector. Above that, no one should be ...



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