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10

There are many reasons for this. Boxers use oil/vaseline to make their bodies more slippery. Obviously doesn't work in a tank-top. 12-rounds of boxing against 8/10oz gloves would end up wrecking an olympic style tank top really fast. Something would go loose, and there would have to be breaks in the fight. You don't want to hit anything that is not just ...


7

The fact that Wladimir Klitscho could hug his way to win after win keeps me up at night tbh... Clinching is difficult to manage as a ringleader. That's why, I assume, it goes unpunished. At one point, you need to allow infighters to infight(meaning when 1 hand is available, even though the other is holding - for example).. As per why it isn't punished? It's ...


4

One thing to realize is that you have two factors that affect blocking a strike: 1) reaction time, and 2) tracking. Reaction time is the time taken by your brain to notice the strike coming towards you, to calculate an appropriate response, and to begin to move to counter it. (Notice I said "begin" to move, not the complete movement.) If a strike has a ...


2

Being unable to defend oneself at any time until the final bell has rung and the fight is over ends the fight. The fact that a fighter could conceivably not take another punch, or probably not take another punch, despite their being time on the clock, is immaterial. Your shock confuses me, since the rule is straightforward: if the fight is on, you have to be ...


2

Jujitsu isn't harder, per se, but the stresses of boxing/kickboxing on an aging body can be very different than those of jujitsu. While age doesn't do our joints any favors, stretching doesn't need to be the purview of the young. My 70+ year old father started Tai Chi a few years ago, and he marvels at the realization that he is now more limber than he has ...


2

I only know 3: 1) Slip the punch: push on the front foot and slide on the back foot a bit. While doing this, also shift your weight on the back foot so the moment your opponent retracts their jab, you immediately push on the back foot and counter with a hard cross. Don't slide too much, otherwise you'll be out of range and unable to counter (which is ok as ...


2

This seems pretty straight forward. If you plan to wear your prosthetic while using the mouthguard, mold it with the prosthetic in place. If you plan on using the mouthguard without your prosthetic, mold it without the prosthetic in place. If you are looking for advice on whether to wear your prosthetic, or not, you should consult your dentist. Your ...


2

Slip & jab with left Sway & then sway back with a jab with left Parry down with left & counter jab Block with right & counter jab Left jab across the (on top) jab and counter with right Block with the left holding in front of head and cross to counter There's a few more variations but these 6 cover the main points.


1

Well, it's defined by an author that there are six ways. Maybe there are four, maybe there are 7. Difficult to interpret. You can slip left, slip right. You can take a small step back. You can move your head slightly back. You can "roll" with it like Mayweather Jr. The list goes on. You can block if with your lead hand, and jab back. You can block it with ...


1

The ability to defend successfully is governed by the following time relationship: reaction_time + decision_time + defend_time(defend_distance) < telegraph_time + attack_time(attack_distance) Covering greater distances requires more time. Here are some defensive principles: Control distance - If you simply want to defend yourself, keep others ...


1

Sometimes your opponent is faster than you. Sometimes they can read your body language and your tells, and fake you out, or feint. Sometimes you might have patterns that leave you open in predictable ways, and they take advantage of that. Sometimes you think you are dodging to safety and you're walking right into the attack. "More training" could help, ...


1

Is there any reason to believe that Ingle's fighters do better than average in avoiding serious, lasting damage from injuries in the ring? I wouldn't say so. The "hit and get hit" isn't a mantra that is NOT widely taught in boxing. Everybody aims to do this, just in different ways. Some are, obviously, better at it than others though. The style of f.e. ...



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