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11

This is really simple. Not every impact to the head (whether jaw or nose) knocks someone unconscious. Plenty of soccer players get hit hard by the ball in the face and don't get knocked out. You're more likely to be knocked out if you're weak, if you don't see the impact coming, or if you have a history of being knocked out (that is, people can develop ...


11

As others have said, a knockout is typically not the result of a blow to the nose, but to the chin. The brain is basically a loose spongy thing trapped inside your skull. When you receive a hard blow to the head, the brain will hit the inside of your skull – much like when you shake a nut, and you can hear it rattles against the shell. This will ...


11

They don't train their head. They train their ability to dodge out of the way of the punch, block it, or take enough of its force out of the equation as to impact with a lot less force or impact on part of the head or body that is more protected. It's true that boxers can generate huge amounts of force with their punches. But that force is measured using a ...


11

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't ...


10

There's basically a few things going on, for boxers, or any heavy contact sport that involves potential head hits: Neck muscles are stabilizers In general, better stabilizer muscles for the head helps reduce concussion rates. Less whiplash effect means less brain damage. This means neck, shoulder, and spinal strength training helps. The rates for high ...


7

Heavyweight fighters are more susceptible to knock-outs. It's why heavyweight fights sell better than lightweight fights. Fans want to see a knock-out. Heavyweights generally hit harder than lightweights, because they have more muscle and more mass behind their punches than lightweight fighters do. When they're being punched at, heavyweights are slower to ...


7

First, I think your coach is wrong: weightlifting, properly done, is excellent for boxing. Second, I think your assumption that your legs are strong is wrong: running is not a particularly good way to develop leg strength compared to methods like barbell squats and deadlifts. Third, I think punching with weights in the hands or on the wrists is a bad idea ...


7

Karate Pros More techniques = more options Actually addresses self-defense as a concern. May contain scenarios specifically geared toward self defense situations. Depends on school. Ask. Cons More techniques = less time spent training each technique. Tends to emphasize fitness less than boxing. This varies from school to school. Ask/Observe a ...


7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


6

The question asks which is more effective: Doing MMA or doing multiple different martial arts. There are a couple of different interpretations about what is meant by "effective" in this context, however. First, it can refer to how well all the different styles of martial arts are integrated into a cohesive system whereby all the techniques work together and ...


6

At least in boxing, height in and of itself doesn't give you an advantage. What gives the advantage to the taller boxer, assuming roughly equal levels of skill and experience, is greater reach. So the trick for the taller boxer becomes one of staying in the narrow zone where he can hit the other guy without being hit in return. In the specific example of ...


6

At our club we typically don't stretch prior to training. Instead we do about 10 minutes of either skipping rope or shadow boxing to warm up. After training we will stretch in the following order: Back. Grab a pole with both hands. Keeping your feet together and against the pole, lean forward so that your hips are forced away from the pole. You should ...


5

It all depends on what you want to achieve. Want to become a boxing champion? Go do boxing. Want to be TKD pro? Go practice TKD. If you just want to be able to fight off some bullies practice (almost) any martial art, most of them are good and bullies/hooligans normally do not have a rich background of martial arts. Also, it heavily depends on the ...


5

A blow to the nose is no more likely to knock you out than one to anywhere else on the face and head so I'm not sure why you've chosen the nose. There is a much higher chance of knock out by a sideways blow to the chin or straight to base of the skull or temple. A knock out is basically sudden trauma your brain can't deal with. A sideways blow to the chin ...


5

I know this answer comes late, but perhaps it will add additional info for folks coming here for the first time. The weight of the glove is not related to the hand size or amount of protection that it offers. Once you know the weight you want, you'll want to try on a few different brands to see what works for your hands - I, for instance, swear by my Twins ...


4

Go to each school in your area and take a few lessons in each to find the one that you will stick with and agrees with you mentally and physically. Once you start back on that road you will mature and your goals will change.


4

You seem already more than fit enough. Everyone will have their own weaknesses, be it strength, stamina, balance, flexibility, or whathaveyou. All the boxing or kickboxing programs I've seen have warmup and conditioning parts to their classes/sessions. They involve rope jumping, calisthenics, shadow boxing, bag hitting, stretching, etc. Doing those, over ...


4

"I'm trying to diet and exercise properly to reach my low body fat goal. (..)" That said, boxing is the way to go. The workout is quite intense, because you need to build stamina in order to box properly. "Also, I want to learn some basic self defense" For self defense, i would include Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu as well, since it has proven its ...


4

Boxing is probably the most effective "real world" martial art you could do. Especially if you cross-train in greco-roman wrestling. Bruce Lee said something to the effect that you learn more in one year of boxing and wrestling than 10 years of eastern martial arts.


4

You can't hold your ground against someone who has the physical advantage. The only thing you can do if you really don't want to get out of the way, is to remain on the offensive and catch him with straight punches to the nose. An inexperienced fighter (as you described your opponent) will instinctively go on the defense. BUUUT, the right tactic is to move ...


4

A few thoughts/leads: Reduce the punishment you're taking with selective attacks - time hard hits to interfere with the other guy's own attacks. For example, if they're punching in at my floating rib, as soon as I see the prep I'll throw a strong straight punch at their punching-arm-side shoulder, which breaks the body motion they need for getting any ...


4

If you're scraping those particular knuckles, probably a problem with your punch technique. You should be hitting straight on with your top two knuckles, and punching straight in and straight out. Scraping indicates dragging your fist on the heavy bag after the punch. This observation may be subject to stylistic differences, but I don't know any style ...


4

I'm not sure how you're scraping those knuckles; maybe make a tighter fist? Pull back straighter? Are you contacting the bag head-on or is your fist dragging? The easiest solution is the white tape used for bandages; throw a couple of loops around each knuckle. I did that when climbing (for support) and got it down to a few minutes. Bag gloves are a ...


4

Since you're wanting more information I'm going to post an answer to try and help you move forward with your training and your goals. I'm going to have to assume you have no prior training in any martial art and would be considered a novice in your training. This answer will 100% reference Dave Liepmann's excellent answer. The first and most important part ...


4

It isn't ideal. I don't think you're going to get much out of it, because part of punching bag training is reacting to the return swing. Additionally, some of your force will be transferred through the bag into the wall, which could possibly damage the wall if it's dry-wall. Also, the bag will probably not be the right height to punch without having to ...


4

In general terms these are the ways I've dealt with different kinds of pain: Soreness: Warm Baths Massaging the sore area Stretching gently after an easy warmup After small injuries from punches or sprains Apply cold (in form of an ice pack) the day of injury, subsequent days apply warm (you can use a zip-lock bag with warm wather inside, covered by a ...


3

(FYI /- I'm not a boxer... I train in full contact karate and do a lot of target and bag work, normally without gloves or wraps - just saying because gloves bring their own safety risks when it comes to your hands as you can't form as tight a fist, so actual boxers may have some further insights there. I've been teaching martial arts since the 80s on and ...


3

Ideally I'd want to stay on the outside using footwork while peppering with jabs and the occasional straight left. I might use the uppercut to punish them moving into the clinch, but primarily I'd want to rely on angling out rather than winning the dirty boxing fight. To speak to the mindset behind this kind of question: this theoretical approach is rather ...


3

Regularly hammering the heavy bag with heavy gloves will compress and deform their padding, so they won't provide the expected protection (to your opponent), rendering them illegal to use in competition. Light gloves still give your skin some protection compared to being bare-knuckled - you can train a bit harder and longer. Can also help avoid repeatedly ...



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