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10

Try talking to them; You're sparring so they working on their toughness is dumb; toughness is not a skill that increases with practice*; it's a deteriorating factor. Being tough is a good quality to have, but it should never be someone's primary way to win. It's a backup. During sparring, where you are trying to improve, you should be working on (placing) ...


7

It sounds like you are fighting people tougher than you, a lot of the time this means you can be faster. Every time they throw a punch, do a quick strike to spots like the side of their arm, in between the tricep and bicep. Strike to their armpits. Strike upwards to their lats and if you can, down on their trapezius muscle. Also try striking the inside of ...


6

Circle them in the direction of their weaker hand. So if they're right-handed, circle counter-clockwise. This makes it very difficult for them to go toe-to-toe with you and they'll have to concentrate on more technical boxing. Think Mohamed Ali versus Mike Tyson. Also, the old chestnut about float like a butterfly, sting like a bee applies: close the gap, ...


5

There's nothing wrong with using focus mitts for technique or cardio. Although, you'll have to get the technique right first before you use the mitts for a high intensity workout. Probably what these trainers are trying to say is that it's easier to have a fighter wail on a heavy bag for cardio than to punch themselves out on focus mitts. They're likelier ...


5

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


2

I'm not a boxer, I have almost zero boxing experience, but I've seen several valid approaches to footwork during the jab. The two I've been shown most commonly are a Jack Dempsey-style jab with a heavy forward step and a jab with no step, pivoting the front foot on the ball of the foot. I can't speak to the jabs you've seen or the examples you describe, but ...


2

It all depends on your meaning of offensive fighter. He is offensive and physically much stronger / much more experienced than you. Same level physically / experience wise but offensive If it's the first one, then you are out of luck. You have got to train more as there is nothing much you can do. You can land a lucky shot occasionally but that would ...


2

You're looking for something that isn't there. At most there is amateur and professional boxing with slightly different focuses, but boxing is made up of the four types of fighting you have dismissed as "tendencies during a fight". The tactics of a Swarmer, Out-boxer and Counter-puncher are so different that they may be called different styles, but they're ...


2

It is natural and expected to be tired and less precise towards the end of a ninety minute hard muay Thai class. There might be specific ways in which the instructor could run the class more optimally from a sports-science standpoint, but you should simply try to do the class as prescribed without taking extra breaks. (I could be more specific if you gave ...


1

It depends on your level of intensity. 90 minutes is a long time to go without a break. Lots of short 30 second to 1 minute breaks throughout training are normally more effective. After an hour of doing anything intensive, the body normally requires intake of food e.g. carb drink to replenish salt stores. If you are not resting to do even this, you will ...


1

I like Juann's advice to circle towards their weaker hand, and it sounds like you're already closing then disengaging. I'd add: don't get fixated on the punches. I often have to remind myself of this as I'm a heavy hitter and a perfectionist and don't like to concede anything, and I train mainly kyokushin these days which easily degenerates into a slug ...


1

have you thought about cross-training? Meeting force with force is not always the best way; it might be useful to check what other martial arts have in their arsenal. Try to take a few aikido classes (just for fun), it could change the way you box with some opponents (even if you can't use the actual aikido moves while boxing, your mind will be changed ...


1

I know one thing intercept the punch if you can't block it. Cut them off don't let them full force punch you by standing there. Also,foot foot foot footwork! Front, back, sideways and circle left or right. Footwork footwork footwork that's like everything. Also try push hands for dodging strikes.



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