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14

I am an amateur boxer competing so perhaps I can share some insight. Basically breathing technique is a major aspect one needs to learn. You can very quickly gas out (lose your breath, which also leads to a lack of oxygen for your essential muscles). Therefore, we learn to breathe through our noses when you're not tense - i.e. when you jump-rope and such. ...


13

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't ...


9

There are many reasons for this. Boxers use oil/vaseline to make their bodies more slippery. Obviously doesn't work in a tank-top. 12-rounds of boxing against 8/10oz gloves would end up wrecking an olympic style tank top really fast. Something would go loose, and there would have to be breaks in the fight. You don't want to hit anything that is not just ...


8

Carefully planned vegetarian and vegan diets do provide adequate nutrition for athletes. The active phrase being, "carefully planned". Martial artists don't have any special nutritional requirements compared with people who do other activities. As for energy levels, this depends on what kind of fuel you're putting in you. When you eat simple carbohydrates, ...


8

An analysis of the literature in 2006 presented data for a number of team and individual contact sports. Concussions in boxing were identified at a rate of 0.8/10 rounds (for pros) or 7.9/1000 man-minutes (amateur). So in a pro bout you can expect one guy or the other to be concussed on average, and one guy or the other to be concussed per hour on average ...


8

But, when training, you can stop and breathe. But there's no time to breathe in a real fight. This difference does not have to exist. A coach should occasionally put students through sparring of some kind that the student should not take breaks in. That can take many forms, including hard rounds with someone else from the gym, or a smoker match-up with ...


7

At our club we typically don't stretch prior to training. Instead we do about 10 minutes of either skipping rope or shadow boxing to warm up. After training we will stretch in the following order: Back. Grab a pole with both hands. Keeping your feet together and against the pole, lean forward so that your hips are forced away from the pole. You should ...


7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


7

Exhaling on a strike is common in many martial arts as well as boxing (most forms of Karate and Tae Kwon Do for example). The purpose of a short sharp exhalation at the end of the technique is to grip the core and "connect" the punch to the body. This helps with both timing and power. For sparring (and thus boxing as well) this has the benefit of ensuring ...


7

The fact that Wladimir Klitscho could hug his way to win after win keeps me up at night tbh... Clinching is difficult to manage as a ringleader. That's why, I assume, it goes unpunished. At one point, you need to allow infighters to infight(meaning when 1 hand is available, even though the other is holding - for example).. As per why it isn't punished? It's ...


6

At least in boxing, height in and of itself doesn't give you an advantage. What gives the advantage to the taller boxer, assuming roughly equal levels of skill and experience, is greater reach. So the trick for the taller boxer becomes one of staying in the narrow zone where he can hit the other guy without being hit in return. In the specific example of ...


5

Here is my opinion: Your jab is the most important weapon to use (if you are taller then your opponent), it is different if he is left handed, then a different tactic is preferred. Your footwork is the second important tool that you need to work on, always try to fade away from his 'hitting' hand .. depends if left/right handed usually the back-hand. The ...


5

Has anyone else fought the way Hamed did in his prime - i.e., the way I described above? Has there ever been another fighter like Prince Naz? Have there been fighters having a style like that? Surely. Have any of them been successful with it? No. That's why you haven't heard of them. The style is similar to why Roy Jones Jr. fell off so hard - you rely ...


4

Since you're wanting more information I'm going to post an answer to try and help you move forward with your training and your goals. I'm going to have to assume you have no prior training in any martial art and would be considered a novice in your training. This answer will 100% reference Dave Liepmann's excellent answer. The first and most important part ...


4

It isn't ideal. I don't think you're going to get much out of it, because part of punching bag training is reacting to the return swing. Additionally, some of your force will be transferred through the bag into the wall, which could possibly damage the wall if it's dry-wall. Also, the bag will probably not be the right height to punch without having to ...


4

In general terms these are the ways I've dealt with different kinds of pain: Soreness: Warm Baths Massaging the sore area Stretching gently after an easy warmup After small injuries from punches or sprains Apply cold (in form of an ice pack) the day of injury, subsequent days apply warm (you can use a zip-lock bag with warm wather inside, covered by a ...


4

Boxing movements, stances, and techniques will overlap with your karate movements, stances, and techniques. Depending on how well you have ingrained those already, you may interfere with them or learn new ways to look at them. If boxing technique interferes with your karate technique, it wouldn't be the worst thing. Boxing has proven itself and has an ...


4

Boxing technique is vastly different from karate... it will indeed engender habits that compromise the karate technique. For example, in karate you don't tilt the torso left and right, or tuck the chin in behind a raised shoulder. I'd suggest instead finding some more physical karate training. Hitting a large shield (e.g. random googled image) is ...


4

Some great points in existing answers, but for whatever another slant on things is worth... if you're trying to push forwards but he gets the chance to slip past you, then you've both advancing and he gets to close the distance in a flash; instead try to be moving forwards as his momentum is backwards and be fully prepared to move backwards as his ...


3

I'm not an expert on the subject, but poking around a little, it turns out that several people have talked about this. As per your question clarification, I'm addressing how the Jack Broughton gloves have impacted the sport. Increased protection First, and foremost, padded gloves make it much safer to punch an opponent with greater force, and in harder ...


3

I have a couple suggestions for you on this issue: If you plan on using this for punches, kicks, knees, elbows, and possibly sword work I would suggest getting something like a kendo stick to do the sword work. Kendo Stick on Amazon This will help minimize any damage to the bag that would be caused by a bo staff or a dull sword but still give you the feel ...


3

You get used to it after a while. That's all there is to it. If you get hit enough times, you stop being afraid of it. The fear of getting hit is much worse than getting hit itself. Also, when the adrenalin is flowing you don't really feel pain. I finished (and won) a fight with a broken collarbone which I thought was just a slight sprain. It hurt like a ...


3

Auto-massage is trending as a main way to reduce soreness generated by hard muscle training. You can do it with your own hands and fingers or by the aid of a foam roller or a tennis ball. I'll recommend you to check this videos. How to Get Rid of Muscle Soreness, Aches + Pains 3 Unique Boxing Drills Using a Tennis Ball Enough sleeping (min 7:30 h) and ...


3

Looking online it seems that you may have to go with a custom mouthguard. You should probably consult with your dentist and your doctor around the pros and cons of keeping your dentures in while sparring. The last thing you would want is to have your false teeth break off in your mouth, both from a safety and a cost perspective. I could imagine an absolute ...


3

I have no experience in boxing, but it's a problem that's also present in Tae-kwon-do. When you're much taller than your opponent, the opponent will wait for a good moment to "get in", hit you, then quickly get out. Here is some advice: Make him pay the price: he wants to get close, make sure it'll hurt on the way there. Get him hard while he's coming, ...


3

So, are there any viable (healthy) ways to simulate the body reactions to a punch landed to the face, intending to practice defense in such semiconscious state? I had heard a story that at least some Cuban amateur boxers will do somersaults as part of their pad workouts. The idea is that this will help you improve punch accuracy/precision when you are a ...


3

There are few reasons for this: remembering to breathe correctly. tightening your core muscles adding additional explosiveness to your punch relieving unnecessary tension in your muscles


2

Whether I'm doing a Muay Thai, BJJ, or boxing class at my gym (I do MMA) we almost never actually stretch before training. Like Doug said above there is a warmup process, usually involving Frankenstein walks, inch worms, jumping jacks, and then a bit of shadow boxing. Every once in a while we'll get something called a trigger point roller and use that ...


2

There are three major ways in which martial artists learn to deal with pain. Toughing through it This is one of the more commonly cited methods. Basically, by being hurt repeatedly, you start to condition your body to continue on beyond the pain. You hurt, but swelling and stiffness is reduced and toy set aside the psychological reactions. Meditative ...


2

It's difficult to know what is "optimum" with regards to any kind of training regimen. I'm not sure at this time whether or not this has been proved out for all kinds of high intensity interval training. The only thing I can tell you is that the Tabata Protocol was developed in order to address this for one particular type of exercise (speed skating). And I ...



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