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14

I am an amateur boxer competing so perhaps I can share some insight. Basically breathing technique is a major aspect one needs to learn. You can very quickly gas out (lose your breath, which also leads to a lack of oxygen for your essential muscles). Therefore, we learn to breathe through our noses when you're not tense - i.e. when you jump-rope and such. ...


12

There are many reasons for this. Boxers use oil/vaseline to make their bodies more slippery. Obviously doesn't work in a tank-top. 12-rounds of boxing against 8/10oz gloves would end up wrecking an olympic style tank top really fast. Something would go loose, and there would have to be breaks in the fight. You don't want to hit anything that is not just ...


8

Carefully planned vegetarian and vegan diets do provide adequate nutrition for athletes. The active phrase being, "carefully planned". Martial artists don't have any special nutritional requirements compared with people who do other activities. As for energy levels, this depends on what kind of fuel you're putting in you. When you eat simple carbohydrates, ...


8

An analysis of the literature in 2006 presented data for a number of team and individual contact sports. Concussions in boxing were identified at a rate of 0.8/10 rounds (for pros) or 7.9/1000 man-minutes (amateur). So in a pro bout you can expect one guy or the other to be concussed on average, and one guy or the other to be concussed per hour on average ...


8

But, when training, you can stop and breathe. But there's no time to breathe in a real fight. This difference does not have to exist. A coach should occasionally put students through sparring of some kind that the student should not take breaks in. That can take many forms, including hard rounds with someone else from the gym, or a smoker match-up with ...


7

Exhaling on a strike is common in many martial arts as well as boxing (most forms of Karate and Tae Kwon Do for example). The purpose of a short sharp exhalation at the end of the technique is to grip the core and "connect" the punch to the body. This helps with both timing and power. For sparring (and thus boxing as well) this has the benefit of ensuring ...


7

The fact that Wladimir Klitscho could hug his way to win after win keeps me up at night tbh... Clinching is difficult to manage as a ringleader. That's why, I assume, it goes unpunished. At one point, you need to allow infighters to infight(meaning when 1 hand is available, even though the other is holding - for example).. As per why it isn't punished? It's ...


7

One thing to realize is that you have two factors that affect blocking a strike: 1) reaction time, and 2) tracking. Reaction time is the time taken by your brain to notice the strike coming towards you, to calculate an appropriate response, and to begin to move to counter it. (Notice I said "begin" to move, not the complete movement.) If a strike has a ...


6

Here is my opinion: Your jab is the most important weapon to use (if you are taller then your opponent), it is different if he is left handed, then a different tactic is preferred. Your footwork is the second important tool that you need to work on, always try to fade away from his 'hitting' hand .. depends if left/right handed usually the back-hand. The ...


5

Has anyone else fought the way Hamed did in his prime - i.e., the way I described above? Has there ever been another fighter like Prince Naz? Have there been fighters having a style like that? Surely. Have any of them been successful with it? No. That's why you haven't heard of them. The style is similar to why Roy Jones Jr. fell off so hard - you rely ...


4

Some great points in existing answers, but for whatever another slant on things is worth... if you're trying to push forwards but he gets the chance to slip past you, then you've both advancing and he gets to close the distance in a flash; instead try to be moving forwards as his momentum is backwards and be fully prepared to move backwards as his ...


3

So, are there any viable (healthy) ways to simulate the body reactions to a punch landed to the face, intending to practice defense in such semiconscious state? I had heard a story that at least some Cuban amateur boxers will do somersaults as part of their pad workouts. The idea is that this will help you improve punch accuracy/precision when you are a ...


3

There are few reasons for this: remembering to breathe correctly. tightening your core muscles adding additional explosiveness to your punch relieving unnecessary tension in your muscles


3

Looking online it seems that you may have to go with a custom mouthguard. You should probably consult with your dentist and your doctor around the pros and cons of keeping your dentures in while sparring. The last thing you would want is to have your false teeth break off in your mouth, both from a safety and a cost perspective. I could imagine an absolute ...


3

I have no experience in boxing, but it's a problem that's also present in Tae-kwon-do. When you're much taller than your opponent, the opponent will wait for a good moment to "get in", hit you, then quickly get out. Here is some advice: Make him pay the price: he wants to get close, make sure it'll hurt on the way there. Get him hard while he's coming, ...


3

I'm not an expert on the subject, but poking around a little, it turns out that several people have talked about this. As per your question clarification, I'm addressing how the Jack Broughton gloves have impacted the sport. Increased protection First, and foremost, padded gloves make it much safer to punch an opponent with greater force, and in harder ...


3

Sometimes your opponent is faster than you. Sometimes they can read your body language and your tells, and fake you out, or feint. Sometimes you might have patterns that leave you open in predictable ways, and they take advantage of that. Sometimes you think you are dodging to safety and you're walking right into the attack. "More training" could help, ...


3

I found great benefits in using the paper and string. Cheap and easy - Hang paper on a string wedged between ceiling tiles or spotlight fittings. Small thin note cardboard I found to work best. Rope can be trickier, but still very simple to rig up. I had one in my office, stand up have a few hits (after a stressfull phonecall) , sit down calmly.. keeps you ...


2

This seems pretty straight forward. If you plan to wear your prosthetic while using the mouthguard, mold it with the prosthetic in place. If you plan on using the mouthguard without your prosthetic, mold it without the prosthetic in place. If you are looking for advice on whether to wear your prosthetic, or not, you should consult your dentist. Your ...


2

Based on this answer, it looks like the recommendation is to mold it without false teeth in. The answer is different for children, whose teeth are likely to grow back.


2

It's difficult to know what is "optimum" with regards to any kind of training regimen. I'm not sure at this time whether or not this has been proved out for all kinds of high intensity interval training. The only thing I can tell you is that the Tabata Protocol was developed in order to address this for one particular type of exercise (speed skating). And I ...


2

A broken or dislocated jaw usually heals well after treatment. But the jaw may become dislocated again in the future. In the US, Columbia University, College of Dental Medicine has done some pioneering work in treatment & therapies related to jaw injuries. So it would be a good idea to touch base with their medical experts. Your doctor will diagnose ...


2

I lost a tooth playing rugby as a teenager. There is a dental school near where I work, so I signed up to be a guinea pig for the students and in return I got a custom gum shield made for doing judo competitions (as well as regular check ups) A custom made one is the best solution in my opinion,very comfortable and snug. Any dentist should be able to ...


2

"fruit and beans" will not provide a sufficiently balanced long term diet, especially when the requirements of being a moderate to high level athlete. And yes, some population groups in history had similar diets. They also where several inches shorter, and unless you're a descendant of those groups, they may very well have had genetic and gut microbiome ...


2

Having equal weight distribution among your feet is a naive and limited form of balance. Demonstrating balance with an uneven weight distribution, or with only one foot on the ground (or, in other contexts, with hands but not feet on the ground, or with two feet and one hand...) is a more difficult form of balance that is often appropriate and useful for ...


2

The huff is a quick exhale that brings all the contributing muscles in your body to support that punch you throw. At the same time it prepares your conditioned body to absorb any shock from a counter-punch that could strike your body. This is part of a breathing technique that also ensures a steady supply of oxygen/blood pumped to those strained muscles and ...


2

Huffing while punching is sort of a golden rule which they teach in boxing. The effect of punching without exhaling is much lesser than that of while exhaling. If the boxing classes have very advanced instruments, they show you with the help of a device which calculates the power of your strength. In that it is amazing to find that such a simple thing can ...


2

Jujitsu isn't harder, per se, but the stresses of boxing/kickboxing on an aging body can be very different than those of jujitsu. While age doesn't do our joints any favors, stretching doesn't need to be the purview of the young. My 70+ year old father started Tai Chi a few years ago, and he marvels at the realization that he is now more limber than he has ...


2

Being unable to defend oneself at any time until the final bell has rung and the fight is over ends the fight. The fact that a fighter could conceivably not take another punch, or probably not take another punch, despite their being time on the clock, is immaterial. Your shock confuses me, since the rule is straightforward: if the fight is on, you have to be ...


2

I only know 3: 1) Slip the punch: push on the front foot and slide on the back foot a bit. While doing this, also shift your weight on the back foot so the moment your opponent retracts their jab, you immediately push on the back foot and counter with a hard cross. Don't slide too much, otherwise you'll be out of range and unable to counter (which is ok as ...



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