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13

Most people acknowledge that, given that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is derived from Maeda's teachings in Kodokan Judo (then known as Kodokan Jiu-Jitsu in the appropriate romanization of the time), it is recognized as a derivative of Judo, but they have each long-since taken very different paths. Jujutsu (the modernly accepted romanization of 柔術) is a broad term ...


12

Genuine Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu all stems from one man: Mitsuyo Maeda of Kodokan Judo. Maeda had numerous students the world over, and upon settling in Brazil, was featured in a circus there, where he was seen by Carlos Gracie, the eldest son of Gastao Gracie, a business partner of the circus there. Carlos was accepted as a student, passed on his training to his ...


12

There are a number of common issues in maintaining a mount. Examine your mount, and perhaps you'll find one of these to be a problem: No base with your knees – When you're riding low, you need to create a strong base, and your knees offer you that base. Keep your knees out while pulling your feet in to give both control and a base at the same time. Stop ...


10

Depending on if the choke is on and how their arms are positioned here are a few options I'm aware of and try to work on (these are very brief descriptions, barely scratching the surface of back and RNC defense, to get you started on further research): Hooks in no upper body control - Protect your neck with the "V" "prayer" position , flare your legs out ...


9

The relationships between judo, Kosen judo, various traditional Japanese jujutsu ryu, groundwork (newaza), the nature of challenge matches during that period in Japan, and pinning a style on a given grappling expert during that period in Japan are all very complicated and deeply interconnected. In my view, if we are to develop an understanding of this ...


9

I'm in construction and like to grapple in my spare time. I read somewhere on here someone recommended Horse Stall Mats.. thats a no-no.. falling on Vulcanized rubber is like landing on concrete, but you get a nice skid burn on top of that. I saw someone else say to make your own out of plywood, styrofoam, carpet underlay foam and drape your own vinyl... ...


9

I've personally seen the following, in various combinations: going slack tensing up and shaking sputtering blinking/twitching eyes glaze over eyes close snoring It's a lot easier to tell as a third party, since you can see things like the legs going limp while their upper body is locked in position by the choke. It helps to have a coach or whatever ...


9

1. Relax Just try to Relax. Sparring isn't a fight for life or death. It isn't even a competition. It should be a playful way to work on your grappling. Even if you go hard you should still be relaxed, a tense body just doesn't move that well. This takes some time, but you will get used to it. 2. Grapple The best way to build grappling conditioning is to ...


8

there are a few things you can do to help with this: break down your opponents posture, it's very hard, if they are sitting tall, even for someone with normal/long legs to keep the guard closed. use your legs to draw them in, and lock up their upper body, this keeps them closer, and makes it easier to keep your guard closed. develop a good open guard ...


7

If you go once a week, you'll make very slow progress. If you go twice a week, your progress will be mediocre. If you go three times or more a week, you'll make steady progress. Training five or more times a week is a whole separate level of learning. (If for some reason you're able to train many times a week, make sure you ease into it. Don't over do it in ...


7

The requirements for blue belt vary from school to school. What is required at Roy Harris' academy is not what is required at Renzo Gracie's, Marcelo Garcia's, and so on. The Straight Blast Gym had a good article about how to view the goals of each belt progression. Here's the section on going from white to blue: White to Blue: The journey of white ...


7

In Brazilian jiu-jitsu with a gi you wear the funny Asian pajamas. In no-gi Brazilian jiu-jitsu you wear shorts and usually a t-shirt or rash-guard top. You can grab onto the funny pajamas but you can't grab onto any clothes in no-gi. The gi absorbs sweat, adds friction, and provides a wide variety of grips to choke, throw, and control from. Often the ...


6

Assuming you are on the ground and someone has your back and hooks in, is there a defense to a rear naked choke? Not everyone is going to agree with me here, I can guarantee that. I am not familiar with competition rules for BJJ, but I understand them to be fairly liberal, with the exception of small joint locks and soft-tissue mauling. With hooks in, ...


6

A good way to get gi / kimono specific grip training is sling your gi / kimono top around a pull up bar or a tree branch and use that to do any number of exercises, such as Pull ups, grip the lapels and hoist yourself up Grab lapels and pull yourself up Grab lapels and bring your lower body up and wrap your legs around the gi in triangle position Just hang ...


6

Aside from all the signs that have already been listed, I would also look for your opponent to stop defending himself intelligently. If you feel that your choke is fully locked and your opponent doesn't seem to significantly relieve the pressure in any way (Blocking/Grabbing the chocking arm, adjusting his position, tucking his neck in etc...) chances are ...


6

My experiences in judo and BJJ The judo club I trained at regularly for several years was about 50/50 between newaza and tachiwaza (groundwork and throws). (Actually, it was more like 43/47/10 with the 10% being kata and standing joint locks.) My time at other judo schools has showed the ratio to be fairly different: 75/25 in favor of throwing, or even ...


6

I was exactly the same way. Slowly your body adjusts, a lot is about muscle memory and learning to relax. When you first start, you tend to carry a lot of tension. When drilling, new people tend to be really stiff which wears them down, not so much cardio, but just muscle fatigue. Its just hard to maintain that kind of tension for entire training ...


6

1) Safety BJJ clubs often don't work takedowns because they regard stand-up work as more dangerous. This is not unreasonable. Even many judo schools will have prepubescent students practice more groundwork than throws. In particular, takedowns require students to pay attention to when they might get thrown, and execute a safe breakfall when they do. Being ...


5

We did an exercise at my first Judo club that seemed to help with grip. We would hold our arms out directly in front of us and then alternate between making a grip and having our hands as open as possible. Basically, like gripping thin air, but repeatedly. A very simple exercise, but it seemed to help. How many times we repeated was a measure of how many ...


5

While I understand the desire and even need these days to be frugal, I would be very careful buying mats from a Dollar Store or Box Store like Wal-Mart. Safety is of greatest concern. I have also used the gym style folding mats as mentioned above and they are problematic in that they do not stay together but easily slide apart when using them. Your best ...


5

The advice I'd give to an eight year old for preventing a Gracie-family-style kosotogake-makikomi would be limited. Dominate the clinch. Get double underhooks, and prevent the opponent from getting double underhooks. Keep your hips away from their hips, and your legs away from their legs, once any clinch is established. This opens you up for other ...


5

There are tons more techniques for escaping mount, but the ones you have been taught are the ones you should focus on. There are several reasons for this. Focus on fundamentals The two escapes you know are arguably the most straightforward and efficient methods of escaping mount. In addition, they both develop absolutely critical grappling movement skills: ...


5

For same day weigh ins, cutting a lot of weight is not ideal, and it will affect your performance. That being said, if you are weighing in early in the morning, and competing later in the afternoon, you will have some time to properly rehydrate and recover. This question talks about some techniques that are out there: Dropping weight before a MMA fight ...


5

Expanded version of my comment on Dave's answer Those who can't get in the forth and fifth formal sessions a week can get some of the benefit by doing some solo work. Forms, bag work, footwork drill, and so on. There are whole books on the subject.1 You don't get the more learning, but you do forget less between sessions. I also use these solo sessions as ...


5

There is no official method since every school has different rules. However, it is quite standard to convert all the belts from the yellow up to a blue belt. This is because there is normally no sense in letting these former under-16 people fight against white belts. On the other side, if they are much better than a blue belt they will prove it quickly ...


5

1. BJJ is Hard It is perfectly normal that you can't keep up in your first month. Just keep at it. You don't necessarily need to supplement your diet or training. 2. Cardio is Activity-Specific Research and experience is fairly conclusive: one's cardio in a given sport does not transfer very well to other sports. Therefore, improving your cardio outside ...


5

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


5

You've taken the first step in doing so - acknowledging that you're doing it. Now, where do you go from there? That largely depends on the situation, but here's a few things that might help to get you started. Learn to roll. You've been put in an arm bar, or you've been thrown, or basically any other situation that if it follows through to its natural ...


5

Yes, power training will positively affect your grappling. It's important to understand how. All techniques require a degree of physicality. (Muscle is, after all, what moves your body in the first place.) Physicality includes strength (the ability to produce force), power (strength applied quickly), conditioning, and other attributes like balance, agility, ...



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