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4

White shows blood best, which is practical on the mat. You want to know if you or your partner has a cut or scrape. However, women recommend keeping a black gi to train in during your period (1, 2). Bleach is a non-factor because it weakens the fabric and will cause premature gi death by ripping. Blue and black look slightly more clean and sharp in more ...


3

The style matters less than who is teaching it. The same style can be taught very differently by different people. I would look for location first: your dojo/gym/training place should be within easy travel distance of where you are. I would say less than an hour's drive (both ways) but that might vary depending on how much you generally travel. Secondly, ...


3

Concepts offer mutiple opportunities: they are general and widely applicable, and as such they allow to compress information in order for you to learn and rememeber more stuff. they are a useful tool to discover, analyze and refine techniques; this ranges from pioneering a new technique to adapting certain techniques to your own body and fighting style. ...


2

May I also recommend doing Taichi along with whatever other martial art you decide to learn. You may have to search for a teacher who knows the martial arts side of Taichi, but generally when you do they are overjoyed to find a student interested in that aspect. Learning Taichi along with your martial art will work to fix up posture mis-alignments, free up ...


2

For what it's worth I was in pretty much the same place as you - in my 40s and in need of some kind of activity to stay fit while being nice to my knees. Boxing did the trick for me. It is relatively easy to learn in the sense that it is conecptually simple (you are only having to deal with striking) but is incredibly challenging to master... especially the ...


2

From your background, BJJ could be the easiest choice: you've already practiced it, it does benefit from breakdancing (read the story of the Martinez brothers at 10th Planet Vista), you were good at it. It does require flexibility though, but you can always work on it. That said, I think the main point is not what is the easiest choice, but rather the most ...


1

We don't have a huge amount to go on here: Easier on the [stiff] joints: suggests you might want to avoid an art with a lot of vigorous joint locking, such as ju jitsu or hapkido; on the other hand something that does twist the joints but less aggressively might actually help you in feeling less stiff - e.g. aikido, taichi. spatial intelligence / ...



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