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9

1. Relax Just try to Relax. Sparring isn't a fight for life or death. It isn't even a competition. It should be a playful way to work on your grappling. Even if you go hard you should still be relaxed, a tense body just doesn't move that well. This takes some time, but you will get used to it. 2. Grapple The best way to build grappling conditioning is to ...


9

I've personally seen the following, in various combinations: going slack tensing up and shaking sputtering blinking/twitching eyes glaze over eyes close snoring It's a lot easier to tell as a third party, since you can see things like the legs going limp while their upper body is locked in position by the choke. It helps to have a coach or whatever ...


8

In Brazilian jiu-jitsu with a gi you wear the funny Asian pajamas. In no-gi Brazilian jiu-jitsu you wear shorts and usually a t-shirt or rash-guard top. You can grab onto the funny pajamas but you can't grab onto any clothes in no-gi. The gi absorbs sweat, adds friction, and provides a wide variety of grips to choke, throw, and control from. Often the ...


7

The requirements for blue belt vary from school to school. What is required at Roy Harris' academy is not what is required at Renzo Gracie's, Marcelo Garcia's, and so on. The Straight Blast Gym had a good article about how to view the goals of each belt progression. Here's the section on going from white to blue: White to Blue: The journey of white ...


6

My experiences in judo and BJJ The judo club I trained at regularly for several years was about 50/50 between newaza and tachiwaza (groundwork and throws). (Actually, it was more like 43/47/10 with the 10% being kata and standing joint locks.) My time at other judo schools has showed the ratio to be fairly different: 75/25 in favor of throwing, or even ...


6

Aside from all the signs that have already been listed, I would also look for your opponent to stop defending himself intelligently. If you feel that your choke is fully locked and your opponent doesn't seem to significantly relieve the pressure in any way (Blocking/Grabbing the chocking arm, adjusting his position, tucking his neck in etc...) chances are ...


6

I was exactly the same way. Slowly your body adjusts, a lot is about muscle memory and learning to relax. When you first start, you tend to carry a lot of tension. When drilling, new people tend to be really stiff which wears them down, not so much cardio, but just muscle fatigue. Its just hard to maintain that kind of tension for entire training ...


6

1) Safety BJJ clubs often don't work takedowns because they regard stand-up work as more dangerous. This is not unreasonable. Even many judo schools will have prepubescent students practice more groundwork than throws. In particular, takedowns require students to pay attention to when they might get thrown, and execute a safe breakfall when they do. Being ...


5

1. BJJ is Hard It is perfectly normal that you can't keep up in your first month. Just keep at it. You don't necessarily need to supplement your diet or training. 2. Cardio is Activity-Specific Research and experience is fairly conclusive: one's cardio in a given sport does not transfer very well to other sports. Therefore, improving your cardio outside ...


5

There is no official method since every school has different rules. However, it is quite standard to convert all the belts from the yellow up to a blue belt. This is because there is normally no sense in letting these former under-16 people fight against white belts. On the other side, if they are much better than a blue belt they will prove it quickly ...


5

You've taken the first step in doing so - acknowledging that you're doing it. Now, where do you go from there? That largely depends on the situation, but here's a few things that might help to get you started. Learn to roll. You've been put in an arm bar, or you've been thrown, or basically any other situation that if it follows through to its natural ...


5

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


5

BJ Penn and Demian Maia The training results of BJ Penn and Demian Maia cannot be replicated at will. Some people just have natural gifts. Luck also plays a factor, as does physicality, especially as relates to avoiding injury. Without discounting the tremendous amount of hard work that he put into training, BJ Penn was bestowed with natural physical ...


5

Yes, power training will positively affect your grappling. It's important to understand how. All techniques require a degree of physicality. (Muscle is, after all, what moves your body in the first place.) Physicality includes strength (the ability to produce force), power (strength applied quickly), conditioning, and other attributes like balance, agility, ...


4

You just started. You use a lot of energy for a lot of inefficient movements. Until these movements become second nature to you, they will drain too much energy. The more experienced you get, you will learn to make the right movement at the right time, and thus be much more efficient with your available energy. What I am saying is, your bridge is not as ...


4

Just as there are many ways to skin a cat, it is important to realize that there is not just One True Mount. There are many different types of mount, and different concepts apply for maintaining them. Here are some keys I use for some of them: Low mount Ankles crossed under opponent's thighs or grapevined at his ankles. Hips pushing into opponent Knees ...


4

Aside from the strength training for grips, there's also certain technique involved in grips. For example, when you hold the right arm sleeve of your opponent, make sure you grab the part right under his elbow, and grab it tight, so he is unable to move his arm properly. At the same time it's hard for him to release his harm since you can control his arm ...


4

Since both Judo and BJJ are combat sports, their competition rules will heavily dictate what is and what isn't trained. Judo discourages training grappling on the ground in their rules by both limiting the time the athletes have on the ground as well as awarding Ippons which effectively end the match before anything can happen on the ground. Thus most Judo ...


4

There can be too much training, but everything you've described here sounds fine. If a student is overtraining they'll notice decreased performance on the mat, sluggishness all day, difficulty sleeping, persistent hunger, and other signs. Frequent training is fine as long as the student builds up training frequency slowly and remains on point with their ...


3

but then I feel really out of breath This is normally a cardio problem. and my muscles feel extremely weak This is normally a glycogen depletion problem (i.e. you've used up your available glycogen supplies). I'm even dizzy This can be a sympton of both cardio and glycogen shortage. While glycogen shortage can be remedied somewhat by diet ...


3

Nothing wrong with either your BJJ or judo schools. As you move up the ranks in BJJ you'll be exposed to more throws and the same goes for newaza in Judo. But like you said, BJJ is focused on the ground and Judo is focused on standing. You'll mainly train for the primary aspect of each sport, especially as a lower belt. I've also seen a BJJ school never ...


3

We are taught to practise in bjj to use a gi (uniform) you can hang it on something strong and practise pulling up if you do not have a gi to use for this excercise you can use a belt a martial art belt if possible. It helps to work your arms and you will be able to hold on with that grip when the opponent is resisting or moving.


3

New user and first time poster here so please correct me if I am out of line. One factor I don't believe was addressed was being able to tell if someone is going out from BEHIND. An example would be and bow and arrow choke where your training partner may have both hands in the collar attempting to defend. In this case it may appear and feel as if he is ...


3

The general goal of not turning belly-down in judo competition is not enough. You need to develop specific, actionable goals to work on in newaza randori (and even, perhaps, with proper etiquette, to set up in tachiwaza randori) and to try out in shiai. Judo groundwork, in my view, is composed of several broad strokes: Rapidly applied chokes, which ...


3

I don't BJJ; however, I do karate and Judo and I agree with reasons previously provided. When I teach Judo, we know the break falls and have good quality mats so throws are executed. Even then, we don't always perform full competition strength throws so that everyone can remain safe and we can continue to train. When I do my karate class, I am even more ...


3

I like Dave Leipmann's response where he makes it clear that you improve with both skill and power / strength training. You combine both for the best overall effect. One of the comments I often hear in BJJ circles is that women often learn better / faster than men, because they don't have the muscle strength that men do. And so they will stop and try to ...


3

I've been working this recently as I've had a number of issues getting past spider. These two I've had some success with, but still feeling a bit clumsy with it. 1) opponent takes spider crouch a bit, move side to side you look for an opening where you can put your knee on the inside of the leg closest to the mat pin it with the knee, strip the grip swap ...


3

Compete now. I generally like my guys to compete at around the 4-6 month worth of training mark. Enough so that you have learned some moves and know how to roll, enough so that you might've beaten some newer guys. At this point you need to feel how a real roll against someone feels like; it's different than in the gym and you need to understand that. Even a ...



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