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9

I want to be able to be prepared against any kind of opponent. You are looking for a unicorn there. No martial art whatsoever is able to do that. There is no ultimate fighting art. That said, most martial arts (McDojo excluded) can give you an edge in self defence. It will shift the odds in your favour which is a good thing. However, self defence is ...


7

Concepts are great In general, I agree: concepts are the underlying part of all jiu-jitsu that works. Posture, base, leverage--these will be constants across all techniques that work. I think Kit goes off the rails by extrapolating from his experience to advice for the general populace, however. For instance: One of the things I noticed early early on ...


7

It seems a number of females share your problems. I read a number of female BJJ bloggers, and they have expressed similar feelings. My suggestion is to read what they have to say and maybe reach out to them: A tiny, shy woman who is mad keen on jiujitsu and gives a brutally honest account of her journey. A post a little while ago where she talks about ...


5

BJ Penn and Demian Maia The training results of BJ Penn and Demian Maia cannot be replicated at will. Some people just have natural gifts. Luck also plays a factor, as does physicality, especially as relates to avoiding injury. Without discounting the tremendous amount of hard work that he put into training, BJ Penn was bestowed with natural physical ...


5

Yes, power training will positively affect your grappling. It's important to understand how. All techniques require a degree of physicality. (Muscle is, after all, what moves your body in the first place.) Physicality includes strength (the ability to produce force), power (strength applied quickly), conditioning, and other attributes like balance, agility, ...


5

In Living the Martial Way, Forrest Marshall makes the insight that you should run like you want to fight: if you want to fight at a slow, plodding, constant pace, then run long distances as a slow, plodding, constant pace. This advice is a gross simplification of exercise science but it is basically true in this context. Your coach is right. Long-distance ...


5

This is a standard exercise in Shodokan Aikido (required for every test). We call it either "Randori" or "Jiyu Waza". We don't standardize it the way you're asking. (In Chinese martial arts, the term may be Sanshou, but I'm not sure that is standardized. Closer to Kumite) My school used to do 4 attackers, 90 seconds, with each attacker starting their ...


5

I was the only 12 year old in a judo club full of brown/black belt adults, so I can identify with your experience on some levels! That said, as the beginner and the youth in this situation, the only things you can do are this: 1) Ask questions, ask for help, ask for advice. "Given my size, can you show me how I could make that technique work?" "Can you ...


4

If BJJ is around, you should do BJJ. If grappling of another kind is around--wrestling, judo, SAMBO, et cetera--you should train that. But if nothing's available, you should do general physical preparation with a slight emphasis on BJJ's specific requirements. General Strength For instance, you'd want to do some kind of general strength (not bodybuilding!) ...


4

You probably gassed because you experienced an adrenaline dump. Solution: compete more. If you're training a lot then overtraining might be a culprit, but that's more easily evaluated by looking at the person's training schedule than the single data point of "gassed out in their first match". If you're not doing any out-of-class strength and conditioning ...


4

BJJ 5 times a week is ok as long as you follow some golden rules. Always stretch dynamically every single part of your body for at least 30 minutes. This will help to rid you of the cramps during rolls as well as muscle pain the next day. Eat correctly and get enough sleep. You definitely need to consume even more calories and get some additional protein ...


4

Five days a week is a perfectly reasonable workout schedule for BJJ. Take care to keep your body running well: eat right, sleep plenty, and stay hydrated. It will take a while to get used to 5 days a week, and some people--due to being out of shape or by not recovering properly--may need to ramp up from only 3 or 4 classes per week for a few months.


4

Just as there are many ways to skin a cat, it is important to realize that there is not just One True Mount. There are many different types of mount, and different concepts apply for maintaining them. Here are some keys I use for some of them: Low mount Ankles crossed under opponent's thighs or grapevined at his ankles. Hips pushing into opponent Knees ...


4

Take a regular beginner strength program, reduce the volume, and do that alongside BJJ. So, just to spitball a program for two days a week on top of BJJ that you're doing, say, 3 times a week: A day: squat 2 sets of 5, adding weight every 3 sessions. As many sets of towel-grip pull-ups necessary to get to 25 or 30. Add weight if it only takes 2 sets. B ...


4

ON BOTTOM: You're probably in the danger zone. You need to either be all the way out, or all the way in. Hanging out in-between is going to get you darce'd or passed. And you should never be flat on your back whether you are all out or all in. If you are all the way out, you should be working on obtaining the under-hook which will work to allow you to take ...


4

"I'm trying to diet and exercise properly to reach my low body fat goal. (..)" That said, boxing is the way to go. The workout is quite intense, because you need to build stamina in order to box properly. "Also, I want to learn some basic self defense" For self defense, i would include Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu as well, since it has proven its ...


4

Go to each school in your area and take a few lessons in each to find the one that you will stick with and agrees with you mentally and physically. Once you start back on that road you will mature and your goals will change.


4

White shows blood best, which is practical on the mat. You want to know if you or your partner has a cut or scrape. However, women recommend keeping a black gi to train in during your period (1, 2). Bleach is a non-factor because it weakens the fabric and will cause premature gi death by ripping. Blue and black look slightly more clean and sharp in more ...


4

It all depends on what you want to achieve. Want to become a boxing champion? Go do boxing. Want to be TKD pro? Go practice TKD. If you just want to be able to fight off some bullies practice (almost) any martial art, most of them are good and bullies/hooligans normally do not have a rich background of martial arts. Also, it heavily depends on the ...


4

The question asks which is more effective: Doing MMA or doing multiple different martial arts. There are a couple of different interpretations about what is meant by "effective" in this context, however. First, it can refer to how well all the different styles of martial arts are integrated into a cohesive system whereby all the techniques work together and ...


3

I've been working this recently as I've had a number of issues getting past spider. These two I've had some success with, but still feeling a bit clumsy with it. 1) opponent takes spider crouch a bit, move side to side you look for an opening where you can put your knee on the inside of the leg closest to the mat pin it with the knee, strip the grip swap ...


3

I like Dave Leipmann's response where he makes it clear that you improve with both skill and power / strength training. You combine both for the best overall effect. One of the comments I often hear in BJJ circles is that women often learn better / faster than men, because they don't have the muscle strength that men do. And so they will stop and try to ...


3

Compete as soon as you're familiar enough with the rules to safely compete. If you know how to tap, can breakfall, and are generally familiar with the practice of Brazilian jiujitsu, there's no reason to wait. Compete at the first low-level tournament that comes up. It will give you an experience many times that of a day training in the academy. ...


3

Compete now. I generally like my guys to compete at around the 4-6 month worth of training mark. Enough so that you have learned some moves and know how to roll, enough so that you might've beaten some newer guys. At this point you need to feel how a real roll against someone feels like; it's different than in the gym and you need to understand that. Even a ...


3

I find that my no-gi fighting has become an order of magnitude better due to wearing a gi. You will find a few benefits: It slows down your game considerably, which means that you can't just rely on raw speed and athleticism to get your moves off. Your grip strength will increase dramatically which will make your arm drags more effective as well as let ...


3

Concepts offer mutiple opportunities: they are general and widely applicable, and as such they allow to compress information in order for you to learn and rememeber more stuff. they are a useful tool to discover, analyze and refine techniques; this ranges from pioneering a new technique to adapting certain techniques to your own body and fighting style. ...


3

If the other person is going as hard as possible neither of you are training properly. Just slow yourself down, focus on your movements, then explode when moving. Think about doing the move correctly, not just 'enough'. Thinking about the kimura, you CAN explode and finish it with just strength, or you can, in a much more controlled and deliberate manner, ...


3

That drill exists in a lot of different martial arts, each of which have tailored it to their unique style. I think each style calls it something different, and some don't call it anything at all, so you might be out of luck there. Schools with a penchant for the dramatic will probably call it "circle of death" or something like that (I'm looking at you, ...


3

My experience here is from the other side. I am still a white belt, but I started about a year ago as an adult man. The first time I was paired up with a woman, it was slightly strange. Also, the first time I was paired up with a kid, it was slightly strange. But the opposite perspective may be very helpful in overcoming the situation. How to get moved ...


3

For mat size, I am listing the official competition mat sizes as a reference to help you assess the difference between practicing throws and takedowns and practicing ground techniques: keep in mind that these are large competition areas meant to minimize out-of-bound stoppages and injury risks, and they are a reasonable upper bound for a mat used by two ...



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