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11

First, you need to ask your instructors and senior students about anything you see them turning their noses up to. Do this reflexively. Always ask why. If they have no good answer for you, other than that they just don't do it, then that's your answer. Otherwise, this is the sort of question that will lead to a much better understanding of Brazilian ...


11

This is an age-old question about training in general. It's generalized as the "Breadth vs. Depth" dilemma. A "Depth First" training philosophy would prefer to train in a small number of things, but teach them deeply before moving onto other things. This way, you get really good at everything you learn, but you won't have a good understanding of the broader ...


10

Gi and no-gi have a long rivalry in BJJ and grappling that has changed character dramatically over the course of the art's history. Most modern jiujitsu practitioners from the US train both and don't think much about it, but there are still a significant number of polemicists on both sides. BJJ came from judo, which trained exclusively in the gi, and so was ...


9

I assume you are working on the arm bar known in judo as juji gatame. The principle in this technique is the use of a class 2 lever to hyperextend the opponent's elbow joint. Resistance is in the middle, at the opponent's elbow joint. Force is applied by pulling down at the wrist and raising the hips. The fulcrum should be one of your legs; this makes any ...


8

There is no "ultimate method" in a street fight. Ground grappling is really good if you end up in a one on one fight, on the ground, with no weapons involved. Fights tend to go to the ground because people have bad balance, it's relatively easy to trip or get knocked over something, and the tackle/bum rush doesn't require a lot of skill to use. ...


7

I prevent testicle crushage while armbarring my partners and opponents by: Pulling the arm further towards my head, so their elbow is across my pelvis and not my crotch Squeezing my knees tighter on their upper arm Wearing underwear (or lack thereof) that provides freedom of movement, so that they can move out of the way of an elbow mid-attack Not giving a ...


7

No. The only asset is if you have to training less BJJ to training Muay Thai. If you will train MT and will have the same hours of training of BJJ this is not a issue. As a martial art you need spend time training. The longer you practice the luckiest you are. Rickson Gracie


6

I find wristlock throws to sometimes be frowned upon because they are somewhat dangerous due to the speed with which they must be applied to be successful, and their unfamiliarity. Unfamiliarity can be fixed, just like leglocks are currently undergoing a normalization process in the community, or like wristlocks-as-a-submission are better recognized in BJJ....


6

Most throws in BJJ descend from western wrestling, or Judo. In both of these arts, the focus is on taking the opponents balance. Resisting one of these throws does not matter much: if someone is good, you can strain all you like against their seio nage, but basic physics cannot be violated, and if your balance is taken you will end up safely thrown to ...


5

I've been training Bjj since 1998. I always learned to squeeze my knees to prevent this pain on testicles. This is the most common way to avoid this kind of injury. But this year, when I was visiting the academy of the Master Sylvio Behring, he taught me a different approach for the arm lock (arm bar). Squeeze your knees early. He told me to close my knees ...


5

This is basically a matter of traditions. Traditional Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioners wear a gi, stemming from their origins in Japanese Jiu-Jitsu which uses the gi as the standard in most of its martial-arts. Many BJJ competitions require wearing a gi for all competitors while others are "no-gi" competitions where competitors can wear clothing more ...


4

In direct competition between wrestlers and jiu jitsu players, you run into the problem of differences in rule sets. For example: Jiu jitsu players do not consider back exposure alone to be bad position and will very commonly attack from positions with back exposure. The guard position is a scoring position for the top player in wrestling if there is back ...


4

There was a machine at a gym I used to go that was inadvertently an armbar exerciser. It started you out on your side, with your body in a "crunch" position, and you moved to straighten out your back, just using your core muscles, resisting against a weight that wanted to keep you crunched up. Basically, this is the armbar movement, where you are crunched in ...


4

I am going to assume we are talking about the cross body arm lock (juji gatame, in judo). It is possible to escape before an opponent sets in a joint lock tightly. This basically involves maneuvering your elbow out of your opponent's legs. It's easiest to do this if you can still move your body around effectively. It is not possible if you wait too long. ...


4

According to forensic science it is pressure applied to the carotids and not the veins that causes loss of consciousness, although pressure on the veins leaves specific signs of strangulation when they bust, but are not a cause of death or unconsciousness. (pg. 297, 14.2 Strangulation, see section #2 re: carotid compression). Although the deeper carotid ...


4

The kimura, omoplata, and barataplata are all attacks on the shoulder. The end result is the same but they apply the attack in different ways. I'll do my best to describe each attack below, but these descriptions would make a lot more sense if you accompany each one with an image of the attack (probably just a quick google image search would be good enough)...


3

What I've picked up over the years about how blood chokes actually work - and I could be wrong - is this: There's a nerve in the neck called the Vagus nerve. One of its many functions is to sense blood pressure of the arteries in the neck. When you compress those arteries, it will cause blood pressure to increase rapidly. The Vagus nerve senses it and ...


3

Both are grappling fights. Jiu jitsu can be splitted in two divisions. Gi and NOGi. Luta livre (some times called Submission) is just NOGi. This is a vantage for Luta Livre (they focus in just one style). The techniques are the same. But Jiu Jitsu nowadays is much more focusing in competition/sport and in my opinion Jiu Jitsu is losing the fight idea. ...


3

To my knowledge, Luta Livre and BJJ are practically the same, the only difference is that in Luta Livre you don't wear a Gi. Both systems use belts for graduations, although in Luta Livre you don't wear it during fights. Due to not having a Gi in Luta Livre, it is understood that some techniques are slightly adjusted to fit the circumstances. Some more ...


3

There is no simple answer to this question. The approach to teaching depends both on the students (age, experience level, fitness level), and on the immediate goals (general development, competition, self-defense, teacher development). The points I make below are mostly from my judo experience. Help students experience success early It's best if students ...


3

I can't comment as a new user, but this technique is IBJJF legal for everyone except kids under 12. The banana split is usually reached fom the Truck, but there is a lot in common between it and the Electric chair submission. If you watch the last match between Eddie and Royler, Eddie gives a textbook exhibition of the Electric Chair.


3

Baratoplata and Kimura hurts the same joints and area Shoulder. It means both submissions are to same result but with different variations. In the same way of the Arm bar/arm lock. This submission hurts the elbow and could be apply for guard, mount, back, inverse and also from inside the my opponent guard (not usual) The history of Kimura: The kimura ...


3

A crossface is a way to gain positional control of an opponent while working from side control (side control is also called cross side or side mount). The gist of it is that you are driving shoulder pressure into the chin of your opponent to mitigate his/her mobility. More specifically, using a crossface helps prevent your opponent from turning toward you so ...


3

This is what Eddie Cummings calls "basic Ashi garami". Note that he is on his side with his chest facing outwards, outside foot on the hip and inside foot hooking the far thigh; opponent's trapped knee is also pointing slightly outwards. Now, compare that to Marcelo Garcia's Single X-guard and see that the main difference is that Marcelo's chest is facing ...


2

In grappling, I think slow wear of teeth is very rare. Problems are much more likely to be sudden impact, when someone hits you in the mouth, either intentionally or unintentionally. Using a mouthguard is common, though not popular. At any given practice, there are usually a handful of people with mouthguards. If you are worried about the wear on your ...


2

It depends of two things: How strong your teeth are If you have weak teeth it is possible you have a little of friction and waste of some of your tooth. How clean are your teeth It's possible you just had a little movement in your mouth and a little of bacterial plaque was removed. Or a little of dirt from between your teeth. I think this is the most ...


2

It doesn't sound like it's an issue with this school, but some schools require that students only wear certain colors, such as white. If you want a gi other than white and you plan on occasionally training at other schools, especially while traveling, it's a good idea to have a white gi to wear so you don't cause any problems at the host school.


2

I hope this is helpful on your journey. I have a dummy called the Submission Master. For me it has been an asset, since it can go into guard position and I can work on reps to practice passing the guard. There are merits of having a dummy and I believe the benefits outweigh the flaws. For example, a person who is not very dedicated may say, "I don't have ...


2

What works for me is to never stop moving. In this training mindset I'm not allowed to think, or to feint, or to control their movement, or to catch my breath. I attack. If I notice myself pausing, I must immediately attack. There is no secret. I must advance position. I must attempt a submission. Repeat. If I am in an inferior position I must reverse it or ...


2

Assuming you don't have any existing medical problems in your neck, then, with the massive disclaimer that I am no medical expert, I wonder if you have simply bruised your neck. It can happen. That said, I would urge you to get it checked. It's inevitable that you'll get sprains and bruises from martial arts training, but the neck is kind of important, ...



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