Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

This is a fairly common problem on both sides of the equation. We have to continually emphasize the importance of breathing during the techniques with newer students… and the importance of breathing out when having a technique performed on you. So step 1 is to trust that everyone in the room you are practicing has probably had this problem before, either ...


6

Before discussing what type of breathing generates power, you have to discuss how the body generates power. And even more importantly, how martial artists apply the principles of power. Martial arts is less interested in the physics definition of power--mainly because it is of little practical use. Typically, a martial artist is interested in the force ...


6

Well you're talking about the specifics of when and how to breathe, but maybe you really should be asking about why one breathes and what are you trying to do with it. Generally speaking, when one exhales, this creates tension in the abdominal area. At the same time that your abdomen is tensing, you will also create tension in the entire core (the abdomen, ...


5

In general, you should be inhaling when raising the arms and exhaling when lowering them. This is taken from the 18 Lohan set which is where the 8 Pieces of Brocade was taken from. When inhaling when raising the arms, you are gathering the chi, when exhaling while lowering, you are sinking the chi to the build the root in the stance, then you have a solid ...


3

It all depends in what your intention is. Like the classic text says inhaling gathers chi and exhaling projects chi. Now if you' re practising you want to gather chi to yourself, so you breathe out when pushing down. In healing or in combat however you want to project your chi into something or someone else outside of your body. That's when your breathing ...


3

Try doing this: Every time your arms/body extend/expand, exhale. and every time your arms/body contracts, inhale. Then try this: Every time your arms/body extend/expand, inhale. and Every time your arms/body contracts, exhale. Both work but for different reasons. Think about your intention. Hope this helps. Now go train.


3

I've never heard that specific description/instruction related to breathing exercises. But I agree there is a feeling which I could describe as "compression" happening, so here are my thoughts on that. I'm Presuming you're doing "square" breathing (or similar), where you are breathing in for one "count" (however long that is), then pause with your airways ...


3

Start paying attention to your breath more in your everyday life. You'll find yourself holding your breath in very small fashions - when you wait for a thought to begin, or complete. When you're watching someone's movement and you're not sure. When you're typing at the keyboard. All those micro-moments when you're holding your breath. Start working on ...


3

I think I've been doing aikido for 12 or 15 years now. I'm still waiting for that habit to go away on its own. I still catch myself holding my breath. Things that work for me: Kiai - (Not all the time, but there are techniques where it helps. On the other hand, you get some funny looks) (I'm mostly not serious about this one) Hiss - Particularly when ...


3

From your description, I believe that your breathing is similar to what we did when I studied Northern Shaolin Kung Fu Wu Su. The way that we were taught how to breath was actually through a breathing exercise we would do every start of the class as part of our standard warm-up routine. Laying on our back with our hands lightly touching our abdomen below ...


2

It's often hard to get a good sense of what to do, in a practical sense, from classical tai chi texts. Their flowery language, extensive use of metaphor, references to connotations we aren't familiar with, and use of the obfuscatory term "chi" all contribute to this. The rule of thumb for fighting is to usually exhale when striking or making an explosive ...


2

If you have confidence in your teacher's abilities, then do as they say. They might be teaching something different than what you think they are teaching at that time. Of course, you could always ask them why. They are there for that. A student's curiosity is (generally) a good thing. Besides, we learn best by understanding what we are trying to achieve. ...


2

In my experience with qigong, the inhalation is done on the gathering (yin) phase of the movement, and the exhalation is done on the expressing (yang) phase of the movement. I understand that Cheng Man Ching taught the opposite of this.


2

In short, exhaling relaxes your muscles, giving you more of a "snap" to your techniques. But the main reason you exhale during defensive techniques is that your lungs act as shock absorbers in much the same way as a car's airbags release air in a controlled way to minimize the impact of a crash. Also, if you are inhaling or are out of breath at the moment ...


2

Which kind of breath provides the most striking power? Peppermint. The crucial thing for striking is coordinating a transfer of energy between the legs/hips and shoulders/arms (even when kicking, as you're trying to use the inertia/momentum of the upper body to help the hips/legs accelerate). That transfer always involves the "gut" muscles. Whether ...


1

Getsugatensho? But in all seriousness, a long, controlled expelling of air from the lungs is better than a sudden puff. The reason is that you need relaxed muscles that snap like a whip on impact, rather than tensed muscles, and a sound that constricts your air passage and makes the air move faster promotes that. Which is why a "Kiai" or "Hei" is better than ...


1

If you're ever unsure, a rule of thumb is to inhale at the start of a complex movement and exhale at the end. Think of breathing in as pulling back on a bow and breathing out as releasing. Which is, coincidentally, how you shoot a bow.


1

Something that may help: take a short kata, something that you can do yourself is best if not find someone who does not mind doing the same thing. Personally, I use either the 6 or 18 count jo kata. Do the kata for one minute non stop. Then rest for a minute. Do the kata for two minutes non stop, rest for one. Do the kata for three minutes non stop, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible