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31

There are two types of choke: Blood Choke: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) chokes involve restricting the flow of blood to the brain, thereby denying it of oxygen. Strangle: Windpipe (Air) chokes involve compressing the trachea which deny the entire body of air. This shouldn't be done in training to the point of unconsciousness as it can cause tissue damage ...


29

Studies Where We Choked People Unconscious In a Lab Being choked out might not be good. But we have very little evidence that shows that it's bad to any significant degree, and considerable evidence that being choked out doesn't seem to be of notable danger: There has been limited medical research regarding neck restraints. One of the first studies was ...


20

Worth making the distinction between a blood choke and a air choke. ie, are you cutting off the air ( through the throat) or the blood (through the arteries). Throat choking is a lot more dangerous because of the damage you can do to the actual throat. Can cause swelling, etc and can cause people to die some time later. Blood chokes, less dangerous, ...


20

and I expected him either to break free or to tap out. When I looked down at him... There would have been a physical sign that your instructor had lost consciousness, like his muscles relaxing and possibly a slight change in posture. You need to be considerably more aware than you were. You cannot always rely on your training partner to know when to tap ...


17

There are two types of chokes: a blood choke, in which blood flow to the brain is, at least temporarily, halted; and an air choke, in which compression to the trachea or chest stop airflow into the body, and thus oxygenation of the blood. Both are inherently dangerous. During an air choke, excessive pressure can lead to the collapsing of the trachea or ...


10

As a former LAPD police man who went through academy training in the early 70s, I can give testimony about the bar arm control hold and its effects, on other police cadets and myself as well. We were taught to know what to do when gaining consciousness, how to identify by hearing, where our main threat was (man with a gun) and how to proceed. Naturally in ...


10

I've personally seen the following, in various combinations: going slack tensing up and shaking sputtering blinking/twitching eyes glaze over eyes close snoring It's a lot easier to tell as a third party, since you can see things like the legs going limp while their upper body is locked in position by the choke. It helps to have a coach or whatever ...


9

Pretend chokes The video is of a lame, contrived demo. The "choke" in it is not performed effectively. It's a farce of a choke. The reason this strutting bodybuilder is "immune" to the choke is that it's not a legitimate choke in the first place. If you know someone who thinks they can't be choked, I think Marcelo Garcia would be interested in testing that ...


7

Aside from all the signs that have already been listed, I would also look for your opponent to stop defending himself intelligently. If you feel that your choke is fully locked and your opponent doesn't seem to significantly relieve the pressure in any way (Blocking/Grabbing the chocking arm, adjusting his position, tucking his neck in etc...) chances are ...


4

I used to play water polo in high school, and some of the lifeguarding maneuvers (such as taking the person under the water with you) can lessen these things. The other thing that worked well for me (especially once I established a reputation for it) is if they are willing to choke you, then they should be willing to suffer the consequences. I would grab ...


4

Subjective experience report incoming: It very much depends on the quality of appliance and the strength ratios. The better the technique is applied and the stronger my opponent in relation to my choke resistance training is, the faster it will end. I can have students choking me at full strength without fading out just by resisting through neck muscles. ...


4

According to forensic science it is pressure applied to the carotids and not the veins that causes loss of consciousness, although pressure on the veins leaves specific signs of strangulation when they bust, but are not a cause of death or unconsciousness. (pg. 297, 14.2 Strangulation, see section #2 re: carotid compression). Although the deeper carotid ...


3

The distinction between "blood choke" and "air choke" does not make sense from a medical point of view, especially when unconsciousness is involved. Any form of unconsciousness is perilous (in a sense of "possibly lethal"). You are entirely right about feeling scared, unconsciousness is scary. The body loses its adverse-effects reflexes, which can easily ...


3

New user and first time poster here so please correct me if I am out of line. One factor I don't believe was addressed was being able to tell if someone is going out from BEHIND. An example would be and bow and arrow choke where your training partner may have both hands in the collar attempting to defend. In this case it may appear and feel as if he is ...


3

What I've picked up over the years about how blood chokes actually work - and I could be wrong - is this: There's a nerve in the neck called the Vagus nerve. One of its many functions is to sense blood pressure of the arteries in the neck. When you compress those arteries, it will cause blood pressure to increase rapidly. The Vagus nerve senses it and ...


2

The only answer that can be given is that it is very dangerous. The reason for this is that everyone has different biological and physical toughness and you, as their opponent, cannot make any valid guess as to how much they can take. (And the truth is that they wouldn't know either if they were honest.) Back when I was young and stupid, I used to tough out ...


2

No, you cannot be immune. imho even training to "resist" it is stupid. completely stupid. If someone is choking you out, he WILL succeed, even if you resist for 5 seconds longer. Air choking are easier to notice ( ... your cant breath) and fighting against your opponent's hold is alot easier. It will helps endure it, allow you to take little bit of air in,...


2

You can simply see it as a tool, and depending on the circumstances where it happens. Usually, and what I personally find naturally, is the turning motion while raising one arm (biceps to your ear and turning around to loose the choke) more convenient. Plucking, is requiring a certain degree of flexibility as some people can´t really do that motion properly ...


2

Philip Klöcking has done a good job covering what the person being choked experiences. I will try to cover other considerations. In my experience, feeling pain is largely separated from whether a choke successfully cuts off blood flow. Pain will usually cause people to tap even when the blood choke is not that effective. You can also choke such that the ...


2

Learn submission grappling from an instructor, not from the internet. You say you've been training for 7 weeks. If you are training at a school, just keep going, you will learn more and more chokes. Maybe with the time you have free to practice at home, you can go to the gym extra and practice there? Text and video is not enough when it comes to grappling; ...


1

Plucking the hands off the neck is not a realistic response because no one who is realistically trying to hurt someone with a choke places their hands on the neck from the rear. The only exceptions are if they trying to ram a person's head into a wall (which is not a hold) or they are giving a rather pleasant neck massage (also not a hold). Standing rear ...


1

No! This is a ridiculous question. No one is immune to being choked in the same way no is immune to having their arm broke.


1

They will not be moving their eyes can still be open and their muscles can still be flexed. Ways to prevent this if in a competion just tap if in a self defense situation pull the wrists down followed by chin down shoulders up.


1

I think chokes are some of the safest submissions in BJJ/Submission grappling and thus it's okay to train them as often as you want. I think the main factor in terms of danger is making sure you're training with someone you trust. Anything in martial arts can potentially be dangerous if your training partner has the wrong mindset.


1

I recently found an article by Wendy Gunther Sensei, which asserts that during a controlled study there was no long term damage from chokes. Short term interruptions in blood flow, transient EEG anomalies but in each case the recipient of the choke returned to full functionality quickly. The referenced article does mention some more serious consequences ...



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