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8

Judo's groundwork (newaza) looks strange to someone from a Brazilian jiujitsu, wrestling, or SAMBO background. Its approach is fairly unique to this particular combat sport. Why? Because rule-sets determine tactics. The basics of judo newaza Other than throwing the opponent, one can win in judo by pins, arm-locks that attack the elbow, and chokes. Some ...


6

1) Safety BJJ clubs often don't work takedowns because they regard stand-up work as more dangerous. This is not unreasonable. Even many judo schools will have prepubescent students practice more groundwork than throws. In particular, takedowns require students to pay attention to when they might get thrown, and execute a safe breakfall when they do. Being ...


6

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


5

First some background on Taekwondo. There are several organizations that certify ranking in Taekwondo. They all kind of look like each other, because they share the same exact roots. They branched off for different reasons, sometimes political, sometimes having to do with the emphasis of various techniques over other techniques, and other reasons. But they ...


5

I've always considered non contact tournaments to be a lottery, but even in full contact matches you will get calls that go against you that you don't agree with - that is the nature of the sport. I would (politely!!) question the organisers and determine whether they have a review process for decisions. If they do then the referees/judges will have to ...


5

Yes, doing proper breakfalls in judo competition means you increase the likelihood that your opponent will score and achieve higher scores for a given throw. Non-ukemi ukemi Noted judo coach Gerald Lafon has made a lot of noise about how this presents the competitive judoka with contradictory goals: Certainly, the most costly exercise in Judo in terms ...


5

First off, the Chen village invented push hands, so what you see there is the way it is supposed to be played. I've pushed with some guys from Chen village, and real push hands is a lot closer to a combination of judo and sumo. Why do people have such a hard time accepting this? I suspect because its actually hard, and its a lot easier to spend your life ...


4

First, Krav Maga doesn't refer to itself as a martial arts. It's more appropriately called "Self defense tactics system." This might seem like marketing fluff, but the idea is that there is no art to it, and it want's to separate itself from traditional martial arts. Second, there is no sports (also known as competitive) aspect to Krav Maga. Krav Maga ...


4

Krav Maga is a relatively new martial art which was developed by Israeli military for military applications, as such it does not have a competitive/sports aspect as with Taekwondo or Seido.


4

I feel that pretty much anybody can enter into competition, and learn from it. If a judoka knows how to fall safely, knows at least one throw and one hold down, there is no reason they cannot compete. Of course any coach has an obligation to be open with their students and if you feel someone should not compete inform them on why, and how they can get to ...


4

There can be too much training, but everything you've described here sounds fine. If a student is overtraining they'll notice decreased performance on the mat, sluggishness all day, difficulty sleeping, persistent hunger, and other signs. Frequent training is fine as long as the student builds up training frequency slowly and remains on point with their ...


4

I'm guess that "Sockgate" is referring to this incident? There's a good description of the "SensorHogu" technology in this article. They use piezoelectric sensors, which is the use of crystalline materials that react to impact with releasing a small burst of electricity. They require a sharp impact, which matches with what one wants for a tournament setup. ...


4

Ippon will win the match (throw where they land mostly on their back, done with speed, force and control, or osae komi of 25 seconds, or a submission) 2 waza ari = ippon (throw where they land mostly on their back, with one of the other criteria missing, or osae komi of 20-24.9 seconds) Yuko (for throws where they land on their side, or osae komi (pins) ...


4

As a competitor, it is not your place to criticise the judges' decisions. You should show proper decorum and fair play even if you know the decision is the wrong one. You can (and clearly in your case, should) bring it up with yours manager/team captain and ask why you did not win. If there is something not right, your manager or team captain or whoever is ...


3

If you are not happy with a judge's decision, you should take it up with the head official. The head official is usually not the senior judge. In my own organization, the head official was our Grand Master, while the head judges were instructors from various dojangs. Just take note of the fact that the head official is there to make sure the sport's image ...


3

In Aikido, the referees will award an ippon based on a good technique from tori's part, however much noise uke makes. If, uke falls over and the technique is rubbish, then all that is awarded is a wazari. There are three judges so even if one cannot see what happens, the other two should be able to. Of course, judges are human and can err but a compliant ...


3

I don't BJJ; however, I do karate and Judo and I agree with reasons previously provided. When I teach Judo, we know the break falls and have good quality mats so throws are executed. Even then, we don't always perform full competition strength throws so that everyone can remain safe and we can continue to train. When I do my karate class, I am even more ...


3

Well, let me preface everything I am about to say with "this is just my personal opinion" - I have only been practicing taijiquan for past 10 years and although this is enough to give me some insight to the art, it is certainly not enough to have any claim of accuracy on the more general history that has brought us where we are now. First of all, let me ...


3

I think the main criteria a coach/sensei should look at before allowing his/her students to compete are: Can they handle losing? If the kid cries everytime they get thrown in randori, or pinned in ne waza randori, they aren't ready to compete. Do they know the rules? Can they follow them? Do they have a couple throws they can do in randori? Do they have ...


3

Chokes are allowed, and elbow attacks are allowed. Everything else is not allowed. There is a bit of a grey area when it comes to "key locks" or ude garami, which can put the shoulder in peril, but it also attacks the elbow so is allowed, as well as the guillotine choke which while a choke can also be a neck crank, so some referees will prohibit it. Most ...


2

The reason why backmount is very often abandoned, is because in judo, you only have a very little time to get a pin or submission. Basically, if the situation isn't making progress in about 5 seconds, competitors are commanded to stand up, and continue the match in tachiwaza, standing position. For this, the rear naked choke is a pretty rare submission ...


2

For a second there from the way you worded your question, I thought you were basically without any knowledge of martial arts and just wanted to try entering a tournament just for fun to see how you would do. That would be hilarious! But I see from your bio that you're at an intermediate level in Taekwondo. That's better. Okay, so as for open tournaments in ...


2

MMA events, unlike the rest you mentioned, are generally not tournament-based, but rather based on planned-well-in-advance ring (cage) fights between pairs of specific fighters. Maybe an MMA promoter near you can schedule you a fight. Before entering a full scheduled ring fight, it would be a good idea to go to an MMA school and ask to have an MMA-rules ...


2

physically they can probably do it. The 19 year old, if he's t the level he can really teach classes can probably train and roll all day, though a rest day would be best. With the youngest, too much training will be when they no longer want to go anymore but will have to be dragged to school.


2

You mention in the comments that you are trying to avoid a repeat. You may or may not be able to do that. Excepting the appeals process, all you can do is show up and compete to the best of your ability. One thing I have learned over 40+ years competing in various things (Including close to 30 in martial arts now) is that sometimes you will have your ...


2

The rule changes have already occurred. If you look at the last Grand Prix events put on by the WTF you will have seen octogonal rings instead of square. And a lot more punches were scored by the judges (as President Choue said, we'd have to award points for weaker punches to allow more to score as they obviously don't have the same impact force as ...


2

I've looked at a few of his videos on youtube... my impression (as an ex-taekwondo instructor who also studied hapkido for a few years, now doing kyokushin) is that his taekwondo technique isn't stellar but is certainly good enough to give a beginner plenty of useful direction for a couple years, after which they should be able to objectively assess what ...


2

As a Taekwondo instructor, I wouldn't recommend TKD if you're purely looking for self-defense. The reason is that you're not going to be able to defend yourself with TKD until you've at least achieved 2nd Kyu (Red belt). This is because for the first two or three years, you're going to be learning how to win competitions, so everything is going to be geared ...


2

So you're looking for a martial art that 1) has no exams, 2) is taught completely without holding anything back from the student, and 3) is not a sport. There are actually many martial arts teachers that teach this way, sure. My recommendation is to look around and meet with all the different instructors in your area. Ask them if they have tests, if they ...


1

If there's no winner, it's a tie. Depending on the style, there might be an extra round or sudden death, or the officials may get technical and look at points from the current and previous matches to determine the winner. In some instances, like when the match was the final round of the competition, the officials may decide to award both fighters 1st place, ...



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