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10

Nearly all forms of aikido are predicated on avoiding any possibility of pressure-testing their skills against resisting opponents in free-sparring or competitive environments. Nearly all practitioners stick to demonstration and practice with cooperative partners. From this it naturally follows that few aikidoka will be caught on camera trying to apply their ...


8

From my own experience, a match between judo/aikido starts at a distance doing Aikido and as soon as the distance closes, switching to judo. I have no link to videos as I never bothered filming any. However, this is what Tomiki found when he started to introduce Judo randori style play into Aikido: his students (who all knew some Judo) would automatically ...


7

Adrenaline is a game changer. The football analogy can be good. You're playing a friendly game, or a training. You won't feel the need to win. For sure, you practice, it's important to feel the stress a little, but in a competitive case, the stress brings a lot of adrenaline which makes you much more reactive to what's happening. The fact that you feel hits ...


4

You can't reliably get good at things you don't practice. In a fight, we don't rise to the level of our expectations. Rather, we fall to the level of our training. Whether it's an eye-poke, strike to the carotid sinus, a chin-push osotogari, or some other dangerous technique, if you never train it against a resisting opponent (that is, in sparring), you ...


4

Great question. I suggest that many of the so-called "too dangerous" techniques are very low-yield in practice. In other words, you're not going to get as much bang for your buck from them as you will your more "meat and potatoes" techniques. Let's take the finger-tip eye gouge for example. This is distinct from shoving your thumb or finger into someone's ...


4

I have a very traditional view on this issue: it's best to take your falls with good ukemi, even in shiai. By all means, try to prevent being thrown, or turn to your stomach and fall with good front ukemi. But using poor falling technique in competition to avoid scores by your opponent is a path to injury, not long-term success. Competitors are better off ...


3

On Diet... If you suspect you're not getting enough calories or the right kinds of calories, you can alter your diet and play with it until you find something that works. Simple carbohydrates digest and absorb into your body very quickly. They can give you a quick but temporary boost in your energy levels. The problem is that simple carbs can leave you out ...


3

You master it by approximation: the more accurate the approximation, the better your odds are when you need it. Now mind you, that also means a great deal of the practice is your entry and positioning against a resisting opponent to deliver whatever is supposed to be your technique that's too dangerous for practice. That's the big pitfall most people fail ...


2

I've had it sporadically occur during a fight as I was evading a reverse roundhouse to the head from a much younger and quicker appointment. Anyway while ducking to evade the kick, Time suddenly starting slowing down it felt like 5 seconds and the kick was still in the air crossing in front of my view everything was black during this time (due to my ...


1

The effect you have experienced is a well known psychological phenomena, known as Slow Motion Perception. It is an effect commonly experienced in high stress situations: Slow motion perception is a subjective perception of time in which things are perceived as passing by slower than the normal perception of time. To a bystander watching a ...



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