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6

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


5

I've always considered non contact tournaments to be a lottery, but even in full contact matches you will get calls that go against you that you don't agree with - that is the nature of the sport. I would (politely!!) question the organisers and determine whether they have a review process for decisions. If they do then the referees/judges will have to ...


5

First some background on Taekwondo. There are several organizations that certify ranking in Taekwondo. They all kind of look like each other, because they share the same exact roots. They branched off for different reasons, sometimes political, sometimes having to do with the emphasis of various techniques over other techniques, and other reasons. But they ...


4

I'm guess that "Sockgate" is referring to this incident? There's a good description of the "SensorHogu" technology in this article. They use piezoelectric sensors, which is the use of crystalline materials that react to impact with releasing a small burst of electricity. They require a sharp impact, which matches with what one wants for a tournament setup. ...


4

As a competitor, it is not your place to criticise the judges' decisions. You should show proper decorum and fair play even if you know the decision is the wrong one. You can (and clearly in your case, should) bring it up with yours manager/team captain and ask why you did not win. If there is something not right, your manager or team captain or whoever is ...


3

If you are not happy with a judge's decision, you should take it up with the head official. The head official is usually not the senior judge. In my own organization, the head official was our Grand Master, while the head judges were instructors from various dojangs. Just take note of the fact that the head official is there to make sure the sport's image ...


2

So you're looking for a martial art that 1) has no exams, 2) is taught completely without holding anything back from the student, and 3) is not a sport. There are actually many martial arts teachers that teach this way, sure. My recommendation is to look around and meet with all the different instructors in your area. Ask them if they have tests, if they ...


2

The rule changes have already occurred. If you look at the last Grand Prix events put on by the WTF you will have seen octogonal rings instead of square. And a lot more punches were scored by the judges (as President Choue said, we'd have to award points for weaker punches to allow more to score as they obviously don't have the same impact force as ...


2

I've looked at a few of his videos on youtube... my impression (as an ex-taekwondo instructor who also studied hapkido for a few years, now doing kyokushin) is that his taekwondo technique isn't stellar but is certainly good enough to give a beginner plenty of useful direction for a couple years, after which they should be able to objectively assess what ...


2

As a Taekwondo instructor, I wouldn't recommend TKD if you're purely looking for self-defense. The reason is that you're not going to be able to defend yourself with TKD until you've at least achieved 2nd Kyu (Red belt). This is because for the first two or three years, you're going to be learning how to win competitions, so everything is going to be geared ...


2

For a second there from the way you worded your question, I thought you were basically without any knowledge of martial arts and just wanted to try entering a tournament just for fun to see how you would do. That would be hilarious! But I see from your bio that you're at an intermediate level in Taekwondo. That's better. Okay, so as for open tournaments in ...


2

MMA events, unlike the rest you mentioned, are generally not tournament-based, but rather based on planned-well-in-advance ring (cage) fights between pairs of specific fighters. Maybe an MMA promoter near you can schedule you a fight. Before entering a full scheduled ring fight, it would be a good idea to go to an MMA school and ask to have an MMA-rules ...


2

You mention in the comments that you are trying to avoid a repeat. You may or may not be able to do that. Excepting the appeals process, all you can do is show up and compete to the best of your ability. One thing I have learned over 40+ years competing in various things (Including close to 30 in martial arts now) is that sometimes you will have your ...


1

Boxing, Jeet Kune Do, Krav Maga (I think) or Greco-Roman wrestling come to mind.


1

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


1

there are no "secret" in martials art. do you really think that when you reach black belt, some weird man will come at you, hidden in shadows, and teach you a more powerfull secret technique that will allow you to beat the best of the world ? we arent in a bad '60 kung-fu movie ... There are techniques that aren't shown to white belt because these are ...


1

If there's no winner, it's a tie. Depending on the style, there might be an extra round or sudden death, or the officials may get technical and look at points from the current and previous matches to determine the winner. In some instances, like when the match was the final round of the competition, the officials may decide to award both fighters 1st place, ...


1

I think you'll be fine in the -64 bracket. Give it a try. If you really miss the heavier folks, compete in open-weight as well.


1

As far as I know there has been one tournament held last year by the Israeli Self Defense Force. The scarcity for competition in this field are likely due to it's brutality. Krav Maga leaves the opponent damaged and crippled through the use of eye gouging, groin, and throat shots. It was created for the purpose of self preservation and many of the techniques ...



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