Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

This is a tricky one to answer without knowing more about your specific situation. If I have misconstrued your question then please add more detail so others don't also get the same impression. Are you a willing participant, or an unwilling one? If you are unwilling, to what degree? Is it just a casual nuisance (someone comes home from training and wants ...


7

If someone is more willing to fight than you, more athletic than you, and better than fighting than you, you usually lose. Try not to be in that situation.


3

I think either you or your self-defense instructor are misunderstanding something. If your instructor thinks it's too dangerous to take more than one class with him because of the possibility that you might learn something and try to use it for real, then it's the same as him saying that you should not learn anything from his classes. What kind of a teacher ...


2

"Closing the gap" unexpectedly is one of the major tactics in fighting, and with good timing can allow you to land a devastating attack even as the opponent attempts to hit you. You can potentially stayed clear of the business end of a weapon attack. There are several footwork patterns I feel are particularly important for this, each with different uses: ...


2

You should get some clarification from your instructor, but my guess would be that this is a policy of the school and not necessarily anything about a legal reason. If this is a college or university, they may have weird arcane policies built up based on their own liability and insurance needs. This may also have to do with avoiding getting sued if a ...


1

I assume, though it's not clear from your question, that some of the other classes are for law enforcement and/or security officials. It would explain why he's not allowed to teach it to you. It's essentially for the same reason that citizens aren't allowed to own fully automatic firearms or certain types of ammunition: The government decided it's off-limits ...


1

Let me add some "psychological" aspect to the great answers above. This is of course by no means based on any scientific study, just my own experience and reasoning. If you've never been in a fight, in a tense situation you're usually and obviously stressed, afraid and diffident. This is perfectly natural and obvious - usually people feel this way when ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible