Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

The 'parry' Bruce Lee does is a pak sao (slapping hand). He incorporated this movement into his JKD and it's originated from Wing Chung. It's not so much a real parry but rather a controlling move towards the opponents elbow. Bruce lee's execution of this technique is very hard. It's normally combined with a simultaneous strike. Of course the real ...


7

I like the other answers here. Let me just add my take on this subject. I hope I don't offend anyone here. Talking about a style's weaknesses is often a hot button subject. Wing Chun was developed with a particular purpose in mind. And that was to train someone as quickly as possible to be able to fight people who were trained in traditional kung-fu arts ...


5

A long sharp knife is best. Also steel-toed boots for kicking out their teeth. Don't bother trying to run away because dogs are faster. They also rarely respond to simple pain. As someone else said, it's a good idea to wrap an item of clothing around your non-dominant hand to act as a sort of "shield". Stab the eyes and then cut the throat. Kick the teeth ...


4

I'm not sure how much you need to analyze this one. Avoiding scary dogs would be a good start. Dogs attack in a straight line, and they use their teeth (and size/bulk). Other than striking or grabbing the dog's sensitive areas (nose, eyes, throat), you have little option but to bludgeon it with whatever technique you can safely deliver. Of course this is ...


3

Orthodox wing chun focuses on "trapping" range, between striking range and the clinch. Within many schools' live training (sparring) there is often virtually no throwing, no shots, very little clinch work or kicking, and punching or other hand strikes are often only trained once contact has been made, leaving long-range boxing untrained. The style has ...


3

Based on the information provided, it sounds like you might benefit from placing more weight on the back leg. When I practice blocking with my lead leg, I find that it works much quicker if the weight distribution is more towards the back leg. It's hard to say without actually watching what you're doing, but it might be helpful to also bend the back leg ...


3

"Advocating getting injured" is NOT crazy; sometimes you must take a smaller injury in order to prevent a larger one. This is a fundamental of martial arts. It's better to lose an eye than your life. Unfortunately, the advice to get bitten and then to step on the dog's paw is idiotic and childish. Apparently Specnaz training against guard dogs involved ...


2

First off if you are attacked by a pack of dogs/wolves make sure you are up a strong tree and stay there and call for help. No martial art can help you against being attacked by packs of wild animals. Unfortunately in real life creatures/people do not each attack in turn so it is not like in movies where you can first fight one then the other opponent. So ...


2

he avoids opponents' blows by a combination of moving out of the way and lightly smacking their limb away with his hand While the previous answers are totally correct in their statements about movie technique vs. real life, this observation actually strikes to the core of your understanding about the role of "blocks" in martial arts. I'm going to ...


2

As with any historical study, the individual elements need to be contextualised. At its core, MA was essentially either defending or aquiring assets. The way to do so was with weapons rather than empty-handed. Parry study in MA likely have come from its weapon equivalent; Aikido being one of such arts. So I think pretty much every MA that has its concepts ...


2

This technique is one part parries and one part fight-scene choreography. Parries are a basic element of boxing, many styles of karate, wing chun, and most striking arts in general. Bruce Lee studied each of these (wing chun most of all in his early career, and boxing close behind it as he explored other arts) and a given instance of Bruce Lee smacking away ...


2

Based on my training, open handed blocks are acceptable and even encouraged, but these may be different then what you are thinking of. We use an open hand to push the blow aside by striking the side of the incoming fist, the wrist, or the forearm. This is certainly something which requires having built up a sense of timing, but it can be quite effective. The ...


2

Face the dog and stand your ground. The worst thing you can do is to run. The exception is if the dog is far away and you can get somewhere a close a door before he can reach you. Speak or yell at the dog in an authoritative tone. It is usually effective to pick up a stone to throw. Dogs instinctively understand the gesture and when they see you bend over, ...


1

Some of the above comments are good; some are not so good. I've had police officers tell me what to do, and I saw one of my MMA friends restrain a dog with a Rear Naked Choke, so here is my experience and knowledge: Wrap a shirt or jacket (Preferably a durable, leather jacket) around one arm. If he bites that arm, shove it all the way down his throat, ...


1

There are four distances at which we fight: Long range. You'll need to perform a jumping attack to close the distance. punching range. I'll lump kicking in here for simplicity. close quarters. This is where Wing Chun is very effective. grappling. Basically anything that is NOT close quarters fighting would be logically effective, but I wouldn't face a ...


1

I was having the same issues with this previously. Keep you front foot light, not letting the back part of the foot touch the floor. Transfer more weight to the back leg. Do drills / repetitions. This basically help me improve alot. You also will need to anticipate the opponent's move, which will come with experience. :) Cheers and train safe~


1

I'd look at your stance. Are you too forward? Too low and heavy? Is your footwork plodding forward instead of light? Are you frequently raising your legs ("marching" in my old teacher's parlance) in anticipation of a possible need to check? I'd bet also that your reaction time is not what it will be after more months sparring. Knowing how to read an ...


1

I am now studying TKD after many years of sparring open handed whilst learning Kung Fu. Tonight my sparring partner took exception to this non TKD technique. I obliged him with closed fist inner and outer blocks. I did not have the same level of control and of course this means striking bone against bone, rather than palm against bone. The consequence is ...


1

I just bought some adjustable 10lbs ankle weights to improve the speed of my legs. Currently i can properly perform the stances, shifts, and misc. kicks and footwork with 7-8lbs on each leg. When i train with the ankle weights i also hold a 10lbs dumbbell weight in each hand, which improves me hand speed. This type of training also helps with the main issue ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible