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10

This is a tricky one to answer without knowing more about your specific situation. If I have misconstrued your question then please add more detail so others don't also get the same impression. Are you a willing participant, or an unwilling one? If you are unwilling, to what degree? Is it just a casual nuisance (someone comes home from training and wants ...


7

If someone is more willing to fight than you, more athletic than you, and better than fighting than you, you usually lose. Try not to be in that situation.


6

If your opponent throws a knee while not in clinch a good way to stop it is to extend your arm (jab) to their chest. If you lean slightly into it your arm should reach longer than their knee. You may as well hit the chin instead of the chest. If you are locked in the clinch you can try to throw your opponent off balance as soon as they lift their leg to ...


3

I think either you or your self-defense instructor are misunderstanding something. If your instructor thinks it's too dangerous to take more than one class with him because of the possibility that you might learn something and try to use it for real, then it's the same as him saying that you should not learn anything from his classes. What kind of a teacher ...


3

First, you need to keep your own posture strong. Then you need to force them to stand up straight, usually by placing your own forearm across their face. They can't throw knees if they are standing up straight. Second, you can force an arm between theirs, and then use it to lever yourself out of the clinch. Or you can stand them up straight, grab the side ...


3

I am not overly familiar with the rules, but I found the elbow to be very effective against knees. The elbow should make impact with the muscle of the upper leg, as connecting with the knee will be too dangerous for the defender. Elbows are also great for "discouraging" kicks to the ribs and it has the added benefit of keeping your hands in a position to ...


3

I'm not sure how "in Muay Thai" fits in; what differentiates a Muay Thai response from any other? Whether or not it's advisable to move in to the kick depends on many factors; obviously if you're not where the kick was targeted, the impact will be reduced, because physics. Legs can be grabbed for sweeps, but capturing a leg that's at head height isn't ...


3

From the clinch: Close the distance: keep your posture and get your hips close to their hips so there is no way for them to generate the power to throw a knee. Be wary of trips or takedowns, or do them yourself. Trip them to the opposite side: when they do a knee, especially one from the side, rotate them rotating them in the direction of their standing ...


2

One thing that slows people down is putting tension on their blocking leg too early. The leg should stay very relaxed while moving up. Apply tension only in the moment before checking the incoming leg. One drill you can do for that is to do a couple of minutes of quickly lifting your knees as if to block after a long training. Because you are already ...


2

You should get some clarification from your instructor, but my guess would be that this is a policy of the school and not necessarily anything about a legal reason. If this is a college or university, they may have weird arcane policies built up based on their own liability and insurance needs. This may also have to do with avoiding getting sued if a ...


1

I assume, though it's not clear from your question, that some of the other classes are for law enforcement and/or security officials. It would explain why he's not allowed to teach it to you. It's essentially for the same reason that citizens aren't allowed to own fully automatic firearms or certain types of ammunition: The government decided it's off-limits ...


1

Let me add some "psychological" aspect to the great answers above. This is of course by no means based on any scientific study, just my own experience and reasoning. If you've never been in a fight, in a tense situation you're usually and obviously stressed, afraid and diffident. This is perfectly natural and obvious - usually people feel this way when ...


1

"Closing the gap" unexpectedly is one of the major tactics in fighting, and with good timing can allow you to land a devastating attack even as the opponent attempts to hit you. You can potentially stayed clear of the business end of a weapon attack. There are several footwork patterns I feel are particularly important for this, each with different uses: ...


1

jump rope . practice lunge steps with weight in hand. jump on a tire layed down on the ground, like them thai`s do. re-learn your foot work. try boxing foot work. move your feet to a beat or metronome and learn -practice to sync steps to the beat. push a bag-punching and practice chasing and escaping via stepping front-back. now give me 100 dollars ...


1

Punch, grab ears and pull them as hard as you can. Gouge eyes, groin and stomach kicks to the rib area. Use your body weight to take down, knee to neck, rear chokes work well also. To separate two fighting dogs a stick is a nice tool to have but if you only have your hands never get close to the dogs mouths NEVER! But you can grab both rear legs from behind ...


1

A few things I've noticed from a little striking sparring against wing chun guys... a fast jab around their guard, slightly from the side and arcing as is natural for a side-on fighter, surprisingly worked really well as long as I didn't do it so much that it became predictable their stance is frontal and shallow (from front toe to back heel), so they have ...


1

I like the answers from both Steve Weigand and Dave Liepmann. But honestly the only way to find the best defense of Wing Chun is to train in that style. Get an understanding of it's principles and how they work, then you can understand how to break it down and defend against it. Bruce Lee is a bad example... His training in Wing Chun is too short to get a ...



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