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21

"Harden up", "come on", "toughen up", "get it together", "just do it", and "let's go" can all be slotted into the same purpose. One could even reach for "osu". I find the gist of the phrase comes more from elements other than word choice, such as volume, sharpness of tone, or accompanying the phrase with a loud clap.


7

Since you are already using Japanese terms, may I suggest: 頑張れ -- ganbare! Which translates as "Do Your Best!"


7

You have an annual meeting or a Christmas party. Ask people to fill in anonymous little forms with: Three things I really like about this dojo Three things I would change. They could also nominate their favourite sensei and say what he does better than the others, that kind of thing. Then you'll get lots of surprises. (I gave up karate after I got ...


6

Using google forms (or equivalent) to provide an anonymous feedback mechanism is as good as you'll get, I think. Bottom line: if people don't want to tell you, then they won't. A pattern I've observed at my club is that one of the instructors is particularly good at alienating the more experienced players: he's very negative under the guise of providing "...


4

I'm not aware of a suitable term that has wide acceptance yet, but there seems to be a lot of discussion on this issue at present (in a wider context than Martial Arts). Recently, on Twitter, the term "Fortify!" has been suggested for this situation.


4

How about "Fight it" or "Fight Through" something like that? It's positive and active, non gendered, and implies an opponent (their own fear etc) that can be beaten. Push Through would work too, often already used in medical settings re pain. Also an honest talk with the women in the group, they may have suggestions.


4

TL;DR I'm recommending "Step Up" as a replacement phrase. The other phrases I include are contextual, and some do not have the exact intent of "Man up". I kinda got carried away with phrases that might fit in the same slot as "Man up". For clarity, I understand "Man up" to mean that the person needs to recognize that their barriers are mental and do what ...


4

Gut up. I heard Alex Jones use it once.


2

Given the context, "Mean it!" might serve the purpose, but I quite like "Gut up!" suggested above. Pretty sure all peoples, genders, ages, etc. are presumed to have guts.


2

My football (American) coach used to say "Get after it." It's a bit of a Texas kind of thing (pretty sure he was from Texas), but I found it motivating. For example, he'd sometimes talk about how he was 5th string his first year in college, but he "went after it" and was starting by the end of the season. Or while out on the field, he'd get in your face, ...


1

I have the phrase in pretty much everything I do: "Always winning - never won!" To that end whenever I motivating someone to try hard I shout "Win!" and when they complete a task I would exclaim "Winning!"... They have not won, they are simply on to the next task.


1

Personally I like "bring it!" I think this phrase covers the intended nuance of the OPs question, because the "it" can encompass all of the qualities he's seeking to stimulate: courage, skill, strength, effort, fortitude, etc. It's also not particularly macho. I find a lot of the suggestions offered so far still focus on "being tough", which whether ...


1

Ante up. I've heard this used interchangeably with "Step up." The phrase comes from poker, "to up the ante" i.e. raise the stakes. "Go big or go home" might also work.


1

Here are some calls for renewed motivation from my army days: Warrior up, Pain is just weakness leaving the body, Everyone must choose one of two pains: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret, It's not how much more you can take, it's how much more you can give, and my favorite - Half-right face! Front leaning-rest postion, move! Now...beat ...


1

I'd suggest encouraging perseverance/effort with a phrase like "push yourself", "keep going", "nearly there", "dig in", "last N seconds", "let's up the pace, folks", "you know what to expect now, throw yourself into it", or - with caution - "imagine you're doing this to defend yourself".... In Japanese arts, "gumbate [ne]" is an option... it means something ...


1

As you have pointed out, it is difficult to get straight answers out of people who are unhappy or apathetic. Start collecting data when they begin training when you have access to them. You should start with what their goals are, how long they expect these goals will take, and how often they plan to train. This will help to understand whether their goals/...


1

If the rate of people leaving isn't too great, then perhaps a personal visit might help, especially for the more blatant cases where you thought that the person was a good fit but left anyway. Be sure to be non-confrontational and state very clearly that you goal is not to convince them to come back but rather to learn how you could make the dojo better. ...



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