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17

Typically, the correct way to approach this is personally, away from the rest of the class. If you have a problem with the way an instructor conducts himself, then, if it's important enough to warrant being brought to their attention, going to them one-on-one and requesting a private moment of their time is proper. It's important to not seem combative or ...


10

The Japanese term "sensei" isn't so much a title as it is a form of respect for those who have paved the way for you in some way or another. It is often given to teachers, but also to doctors, lawyers, politicians and even members of the church. It can even be used when referring to artists, or basically anyone that has mastered an art form or a specific ...


10

Not really. Bowing is mostly a Japanese phenomenon. Even then in Shorinji Kempo (a japanese style) we don't bow but rather put our palms together in a traditional Buddhist greeting. In Chinese arts they tend to make a rough yin/yan with the hands. In boxing you touch fist with your opponent. As for when to bow this also varies. Generally it's some ...


9

The short form of the answer is that it is entirely dependent on the organization and its standards and customs. For the longer answer, start by looking at the way the word "master" is used in English and notice that it has several meanings that are only loosely related. "Master" can mean "teacher", it can mean "lord" especially when referring to the "...


8

I seem to have been thaught a story similar to what Sardathrion explains, yet slightly different. Sadly, though, I have no reference other than "my sensei told me". According to my sensei, people wore the left side on top because the inside of the kimono became easily accessible with the right hand, a bit like a big pocket, allowing to dissimulate weapons (...


7

I'm a Taekwondo Master, but having met plenty of martial artists over the years I've been referred to as Sensei by Karateka (along with their traditional "oss" shout) and Sifu by Wing Chun practitioners (with a wrapped fist gesture). In all case I normally bow in the way I have been taught and (if meeting them for the first time) say "just Andy is fine". ...


6

As with any type of job, class or organization try and raise the issue in private in a one on one session. This will ensure that the instructor, owner or leader does not feel threatened or disrespected and become defensive or combative. It's important to try and not make them feel threatened or that your criticizing them. Steer the conversation into as much ...


6

Have the adult conversation with the instructor in question. Let them know that you have some feedback from people that have left, that they felt that their introduction was too advanced for a novice and leave it at that. Don't put words in people's mouths but provide the constructive critical feedback. If they are upset at your feedback, you have a ...


6

Gi, or more properly dōgi (道着) is wafuku (和服), or Japanese Clothing, and the handedness (for lack of a better word) of kimono is that it is worn with the left panel over the right. It is mostly out of tradition, likely with roots in the the codification of Shintō traditions in which an order of things must be observed (for instance, when praying at a Shintō ...


5

[...] how to respectfully address masters of other styles. In exactly the same way as you would do in any other setting: politely ask them. If you do not know something, you seek knowledge. You read books, ask those more knowledgeable as yourself (like on this site ^_~), and if all else fails use the scientific method. The latter is deviating from the ...


5

As far as I know the left side over right is for the living. Dead bodies get kimono tied right over left. Some sources include wikipedia and Japan Zone for example. So, unless you are an undead, there are no exceptions.


5

The world of martial arts is far too varied - both geographically and culturally - for there to be a one-size-fits-all answer to this. Some places use the term (or a similar term in the local language) for the 'head' instructors, others only for a specific rank and above (such as 5th dan), others use 'master' for all black belts, others dont use it at all. ...


5

My understanding is that the use of the word "master"–as it tends to get used by US practitioners in US schools–is generally a European/US thing that started when these arts got imported after WWII, and one that varies heavily by style. Japanese systems, at least, tend to just use the term "Sensei" (先生). Some systems may use another term for extremely well ...


4

This sounds like it's probably Cantonese or a related dialect. You're going to be best off finding someone who speaks the language to tell you the exact meaning, though whether it is "correct" is often tradition based and may be specific to the region your style comes from or the actual lineage itself. The bit I can tell you: "Shifu Hao" is a basic ...


3

You've gotten some good answers here. Another approach might be to suggest to the head instructor that it might be time for the club to offer different level classes. Most schools separate out beginners from advanced students; if the club has a mix of black belts and newcomers, it would be appropriate for the club to do the same. You might have to offer ...


3

I cannot add more to the answers already there apart form a few advice: be assertive. Assertiveness at work is a good book to have to learn how to do it. Basically, it is looking at how to criticise actions but not the person doing them while focusing on resolving the problem at heart. So instead of saying "Your classes are too hard so new members ...


2

Agh heck, I'll post this as an answer: It may be something akin to button sides. This may explain the difference in death as well, as few corpses dress themselves (zombies excepted, of course ;). http://www.primermagazine.com/2010/field-manual/why-do-men%E2%80%99s-and-women%E2%80%99s-shirts-button-on-different-sides Mens’ buttons are on the right side ...


2

You could try "Sir", or "Ma'am"/"Miss" (or local equivalents thereof). In Taekwondo, there are Korean terms for instructor, assistant instructor, etc., but in my organisation we address each other (both senior and junior) as "Sir" or "Ma'am"/"Miss". Both other answers and your own question highlight the most important part of addressing other students and ...


2

There's no worldwide definition for master or grandmaster. Some schools or lineages might apply it if you've been at a certain rank for X number of years, or if you can complete certain tasks or tests... outside of that, it's pretty much what anyone chooses to call themselves or others choose to call them. In my own personal view, someone who has good ...


2

Ain't nobody my master. For sure ain't nobody my grandmaster. I've got sensei, I've got coaches. Those are personal relationships with reciprocal obligations of their own, and I choose them. But the idea of a man having a master is outdated feudal* bullpuckey. Similarly, my coaches have coaches, and sometimes they teach me. In that case they're my coach, and ...


2

We can't answer your question The particular distinction that you've provided differs between systems, languages, organizations, and sometimes individuals. Since you haven't specified your organization, we can't even address why they consider "instructor" and "teacher" differently. More broadly, the reasoning may range from ceremonial titles (some styles ...


1

In Taekwon-do, a Grandmaster is a practitioner who has attained the rank of 9th Degree Black Belt (also known as 9th Dan, for some). He is called the "Sasung-nim". A Master is one who is 7th or 8th Degree Black Belt. Ranks below that are commonly known as "Sabum-nim" (Instructor) or "Boo-Sabum-nim" (Asst. Instructor). Whether or not a person should be ...


1

In Kukki-Taekwondo (WTF) the definition varies. Officially the Kukkiwon doesn't award Grandmaster titles. Most people generally assume that 8th Dan Kukkiwon and upward is Grandmaster - the Kukkiwon staff will frequently refer to 8th Dans as Grandmaster, but often slip to Master. I asked my contact at Changmookwan HQ in Korea to ask the head of ...


1

In my art Tang Soo Do, we have Gups (colored belt, or beginning students), Dans ("black belts"), Ko Sa Nim (Instructor, generally about 2nd degree) Sa Bom Nims (Master instructor, 4th degree +). Grandmasters (8 degree +), Kwan Jang Nim (Is the head of the federation or the master of all the masters in a given group of schools for example WTSDF Word Tang Soo ...


1

Generally speaking, a grandmaster is someone who has attained the top rank in a martial art. In some, the title is reserved for those who have received an honorary rank due to their commitment to the sport. To look at it from an academic perspective, a grandmaster would be a professor with a PHD or an honorary doctorate.


1

Why don't you just ask him (or her)? You'll have your question answered, and you're likely to be seen in a more positive light by your instructor for having asked. Plus, your instructor will be able to share some key information with you.


1

I think this varies among different place. I just provide the situation of where I train. I train taekwondo in Hong Kong. My master is a Korean, so I guess this is quite a traditional way. In my school there is only one master 師父 (師=teacher, 父=father) and all of us are his students. All of us call him master. For those who teach, we call them 師兄/師姐 (兄=...



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