Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

33

First, each art and instructor is going to approach this differently. Most everyone that I've trained with over the years has, at least somewhat, agreed that aliveness is a vital component. Unfortunately, there's no way to truly prepare; at its worst, we still always know that our training partners are not going to kill us. Part of the mental preparation ...


30

The flinch reaction is a nervous system reaction to a stimulus in order to protect a portion of the body inherently felt to be at risk. When your nervous system is repeatedly overridden (for example, when we repeatedly stretch past the point of basic resistance) the body relaxes and the signal to fire that reflex is no longer sent under that stimulus. ...


15

For all the talk about kinetic linking (like it's something we didn't already know for centuries), the truth is really rather simple: pushups, while good for developing muscle and overall personal health, are really ancillary to the development of raw punching power. Further, the tendency to isolate the arms by maintaining rigidity in the rest of the body ...


13

Rory Miller has written a few books that talk about this topic extensive and provide a variety of drills focused around the mental aspects of self defense, specifically: Facing Violence: Preparing for the Unexpected Drills: Training for Sudden Violence In Facing Violence he talks about the various stages of escalation in the real world and what, your ...


13

I feel there's a core issue here being neglected: When I throw a punch, SOMETIMES MY WRIST DOESN'T STAY STRAIGHT and I run the risk of spraining it. If I could highlight, underline, and make it flash, I would. Your issue here is not simply wrist strength (which, by the way, is not going to be corrected by simple strength training alone), but rather ...


13

Yes! Martial arts can help you with posture, improve you overall fitness and stamina, and give you the discipline to do things correctly. No! There are much better ways to get a good posture and behaviour while working at a desk than joining a martial art class. You can see a physiotherapist, get a new chair, have a work station safety analysis done, take ...


12

Firstly I really apologise for this round about answer. To train as a martial artist really requires that you seek out proper instruction from qualified, competent instructors. They should lead you through the appropriate exercises based on your physical fitness and ability. That said, any exercise that causes sharp pain, dull continuous pain or that ...


11

INTERVALS! the best way to train cardio for martial arts is to train is as similar a fashion as the activity your are training for. hrm, that's a bit of an awkward sentence. take football (american) those big dudes that have to explode out and block the other big dudes, they arn't running miles and miles and miles, they are doing sprints and a lot of ...


11

Chen style Taiji comes first, historically speaking. From that came at least two variations of Yang style. Wu style derived from Yang style. Wu (Hao) derived from Yang and Chen style. You can find more details of the actual lineages on the web. Personally, if you're just interested in the "health" aspects of Taiji, then any of them will do just fine. All ...


9

As mentioned in this and other answers to that question one of the biggest things you can do to help your knees are progressively more difficult bodyweight squat variations or barbell/dumbbell squats (preferably with help of a trainer). These have a direct impact on the muscles that are responsible for stabilizing the knee, and done correctly they are ...


9

One of my favorite exercises in that area is holding a side kick against the wall. You execute a side kick with your foot against the wall, and then you shift your weight forward until your foot no longer slides down. This will only work if you hold your leg at least in a horizontal line. Once you have some balance you can work on height. If you get your ...


9

Squats are your friend, as well as leg presses. You want to strengthen all the muscles around your knee so if/when the tendons and ligaments start to wear out, the muscles can compensate. When your doing your squats, make sure to keep your back straight, your heals on the floor, and try to keep your knees from going to far forward (they shouldn't pass ...


9

One of my instructors used to say that martial arts is only good if you know you are going to be in a fight. If you are attacked unexpectedly what will likely happen is you will have a natural instinctive reaction (fight or flight, flinch response). This is because you weren't in the mental mindset of expecting a confrontation (as you would be in a class or ...


8

I've had the same problem for my whole judo and jiu jitsu career! Squats and lunges. When your coming in for your o-goshi (hip throw) or seoi nage (shoulder throws) be sure to be stepping in low, not waiting until your turned in to get low. This makes the motion a lot easier. The other thing is try to keep it all one fluid motion. I found when I was ...


8

stslavik has the right idea. You need to dampen your current reaction so you can substitute another. Martial Arts hoodoo talk: You flinch because your mind gets caught on the idea of being hurt. If you can still your mind, your reactions will become more in line with your intent. For me the thing that's helped most is visualization. As stslavik ...


8

Honestly, the best thing you can probably start with is not going to be a martial art at all. Instead, try the following: Strength Training One of the biggest culprits in back pain, knee pain, etc can actually be corrected by increasing the strength of the surrounding muscles. I had hip issues and years and years of martial arts did not fix my hip issues, ...


8

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


7

Not to sound terribly flippant or dismissive, but the best way to build up to doing a stance is to do the stance. When we perform a specific activity, we engage the muscles necessary for that activity. If you want, for instance, to effectively chop wood, then you should chop wood. This also serves the secondary purpose of building up your neural pathways to ...


7

This reminds me of a training technique my old track and field trainer sometimes used for condition training. If you get short(er) breaks then you'll be forced to run (or in this case fight) while you are more fatigued than usual which indeed is good for condition training. It will also teach you to "keep up" your coordination and technique while ...


7

As my sensei says, "there is the right amount of power and speed in the technique". Basically, what he is saying is that if you do it right, the speed will come on its own. Foundation That said, there is a difference between speed, strength, and power. It's one thing to say you can put 400lbs on your back and squat with it. That speaks to strength. ...


7

Warm up with slow, high-precision, well-known moves You should warm up thoroughly, ending with light, smooth, slow movements that you've already mastered. From Tom Kurz' article, A Well-Run Workout: The Warm-Up: Warm-up regulates emotional states because the flow of impulses from working muscles (respective motor and sensory nerve centers, actually) ...


6

The biggest things that have helped me: To second Patricia: Squats, particularly bodyweight squats, close squats (where your feet are closer together), and (now) one-legged squats. Ensuring good form all the way through the exercise and ensuring that you go below parallel (above parallel may cause knee issues). There are a couple of good progressions out ...


6

Knee issues more often than not come from postural mistakes, rather than suwari waza. My advice is to just practice suwari waza and try to increase the amount of training until you get confortable. If you learn to do it properly, your movements will improve and will prove less painful to your knees. I should also note that doing suwari waza is much easier ...


6

Disclaimer: I am a beginner in both judo and physical culture. My views on strength, conditioning, and technique should be viewed with skepticism. You're right that training once a week is insufficient. Most people won't see much progress in either physical condition or skills at less than two days a week minimum. I'll address solutions in the context of ...


6

Fitness for martial arts doesn't mean just strength or aerobic capacity. It also requires flexibility and agility. Please don't ignore stretching--both in order to be better, and also to train safer. Injuries often inhibit, even preclude, eager training. (Said by the guy who's not trained seriously for a month while nursing a shoulder injury.) When I moved ...


6

What Is Hojo Undō? The term Hojo undō is generally translated as "supplementary exercises". Now, I can't read or speak Japanese, but the ever-useful Saiga-JP Kanji Dictionary translates the the following kanji in the phrase as: 補 fill up / supplement / compensate for / assistant 助 help / assist / aid / support / save / rescue / relieve / be helpful / ...


5

Note that this answer generated a lot of debate. This is good, in my opinion, as I hope it prompted people to think about the issues of how we all should react to violence. However, it made the comments really argumentative which is not the purpose of this site. Thus, I have added some of the comments after the section. I believe that the section I added ...


5

Like Sardathrion said, Cardio is very important. Stretching is also vital, I've tweaked my planting knee because I can't split my legs far enough apart. There are a number of very good books on Amazon about martial arts stretching and exercises. I know some people who self trained them selves through books, like Bruce Lee's Tao of Jeet Kune Do. But honestly ...


5

Practice your squats, keeping your back straight and head up. Repeat until you die :) I think your instructor is reminding you to 'bend your knees' and not 'bend your back' when lift or need to get low. A common call at many dojo's I'm sure! If you're tall (I'm 6 foot and skinny) you will find it difficult to "lift" an opponent with, let's say "a low ...


5

There's a good article called "The truth about violence" by one Sam Harris which explains the necessary mental preparedness nicely, imo. With regard to your question, I'd say the key takeaway is this: This is the core principle of self-defense: Do whatever you can to avoid a physical confrontation, but the moment avoidance fails, attack explosively for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible