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I just read an article where a group of students in Inchon (seniors) had measurements taken over a period of time and while at their age (the men) were expected to have 25% less strength due to age but because of training actually had 65% greater strength from training regularly - at 65 and greater. I am 57, and have been training since 11, I feel good. ...


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Background, in case you're curious, I'm a second dan black belt training for competitive sparring. So, it's my opinion that there are two things that you should work on to improve finesse. One of them is flexibility, but I'm sure you already know this. Have a solid stretching routine, and stick with it. The most important places to stretch are your hips and ...


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I haven't done straight boxing, but have 20+ years of striking TMA's with some kickboxing thrown in. I started BJJ when I was about 44, and got my black belt just before my 59th birthday. I spent about six years at white belt, but the rest of my belt progression matched that of many of my younger peers. I do pretty much all BJJ now, TBH I got sick of ...


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Yes, you will if you want! If you can't, your dailly practice will make you able. Of course, there are some martial arts that focus on kicks or forms like Taekowndo and Wushu that require more legs flexbility and other like boxe that requires less flexbility. It's up to you to choose a martial art that fits on you or you try to fit on the martial art.


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I took it quite literally by perform 50 of each kick daily. I saw improvements pretty quickly. Concentrate on the technique first. The flexibility will come with time.


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First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


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Jiu Jitsu is about Technique. There are movements that needs a little more flexibility than others but not exceptional flexibility. You will learn movements that require or not flexibility, also movements that require more explosion or strength. During the fight you will use just that you are comfortable and confident to do. Because the Technique is the ...


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Jujitsu isn't harder, per se, but the stresses of boxing/kickboxing on an aging body can be very different than those of jujitsu. While age doesn't do our joints any favors, stretching doesn't need to be the purview of the young. My 70+ year old father started Tai Chi a few years ago, and he marvels at the realization that he is now more limber than he has ...


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Flexibility. It is not required, I don't think it is ever required in any martial art (except maybe ones that actually involve it, like say capoeira and some kicking based martial arts) It is just good for you, without flexibility you end up having lots of vulnerabilities other martial artists may not have (for example you are more vulnerable to choking ...



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