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11

Footwork is not just about moving in the right directions, it's also about getting there quickly and being in balance as you do it. Footwork will be no good to you if you are a lumbering elephant with no balance or dexterity. A couple of ways to get lighter on your feet are: skipping. While used extensively in boxing for fitness, it also teaches you to ...


8

Try pivoting on the heel, before you shift your weight onto the foot, as opposed to pivoting on the ball after the weight is already on it. I had an interesting experience regarding this question when I switched from traditional Tae Kwon Do to Shaolin Kung Fu years ago: In TKD, there was a very intense focus on all the little details of how exactly to ...


7

I'd say that doesn't sound like a footwork issue, but rather like a problem of timing and distance. If you jab and your opponent has time to counter with a side kick then you are to far away. Try to work out your exact range for the different types of techniques (using a heavy bag or any other target, or just a wall if you don't have equipment. Don't ...


6

Tenshin is the same as Tenkai "Tenshin..Pivoting with feet in one position..face other direction.( also called Tenkai )." Aikido Glossary Tsugi Ashi is the "shuffling" step (the first step in tai sabaki - there is an example at about 0:12 on this video, and some more video here (video good - I don't speak the language in which it is narraged). There is a ...


4

The Hung brothers, Hung I-mien and Hong I-hsiang, differed on their expressions of baguazhang and xingyiquan. Both men had trained under the same teacher. Hung I-mien, being smaller and whipcord thin, picked up his feet. He tend to dance around in unpredictable directions and taught the forms that way to his students. Hung I-hsiang, on the other hand, was ...


4

IMVHO, reasons like "getting power from the ground" (or similar) are usually given by someone who either doesn't have a good explanation for the practice or does not want to tell you the real reason (either due to complexity or insufficient rank). Yes, there is a bio-mechanical advantage to be gained from correct leverage of the leg/foot against the ground, ...


3

Roundhouse kick - if not already, try rotating a bit more on the balls of your feet to reduce some of the surface area that may be causing friction. Just be careful you're not compromising your balance in the process. You can also try different mats - foam puzzle mats, such as those used for taekwondo sparring matches, may be more comfortable for practicing ...


3

Kondo Sensei (Tomiki Aikido, check wikipedia for his vitals) says that the reason we slide our feet rather than lifting them is that when you lift your feet you give up a bit of balance. I would rephrase this to say that you cannot lift your foot unless you have no weight on that foot; that means for that instant your balance is focused on the weight ...


2

Tenshin is doing an ayumi ashi step forwards followed by a small tenkan, moving offline and adjusting to face uke. It is the beginning footwork that is done in the aikikai version of yokomen uchi shihonage omote.


2

Every martial art has its own philosophy which influences what is emphasized. That philosophy is in turn influenced by: Terrain of the region it grew up in Available weapons (including strikes as weapons) The martial arts of the surrounding areas (i.e. common enemies) If the terrain is a loose gravel, or many unpredictable sink holes in the ground, ...


2

From my experience with iaido, sliding the foot along the ground is actually just the first level of a more complex skill which involves expanding your energy forward from the hips (and sliding the legs back involves compressing your energy). The movement actually comes from the hip and is expressed in the foot. This changes rather drastically the power ...


1

I just bought some adjustable 10lbs ankle weights to improve the speed of my legs. Currently i can properly perform the stances, shifts, and misc. kicks and footwork with 7-8lbs on each leg. When i train with the ankle weights i also hold a 10lbs dumbbell weight in each hand, which improves me hand speed. This type of training also helps with the main issue ...


1

If you have a partner to work on this with, below is a set of drills I've found particularly useful for improving footwork, speed, and timing (which, I'd agree with Sean, seems like a large part of what you're asking about). You and a partner face off as you would for a sparring match, and one of you takes the role of aggressor. The aggressor steps forward ...



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