Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Everything that's physically challenging carries the chance of injury. Deal with it. Running risks joint degeneration. Bicycling can be bad for sexual function and mobility. Hikers get lost and freeze to death. Tennis causes elbow pain. Soccer players blow out their knees. Baseball players risk concussions from wayward pitches to the head. Lifting weights ...


19

The likely study Chris Leblanc's 2007 article in the Journal of Non-lethal Combatives argues strongly that the claim "most fights go to the ground" originates with the Gracie family, famous for popularizing Brazilian jiu-jitsu, a groundfighting art. I vaguely recall seeing Rorion and Helio repeating this claim in video, but cannot produce an example at this ...


14

"Clinch happens." Without training, people who fight very frequently end up in a clinch or on the ground. (This is common for people who train in non-sparring, non-grappling arts, too.**) It's just a natural outcome for a fight, unless you're proficient in grappling. In most cases, one cannot stop grappling without...drum roll...grappling. Probabilities ...


10

Depending on if the choke is on and how their arms are positioned here are a few options I'm aware of and try to work on (these are very brief descriptions, barely scratching the surface of back and RNC defense, to get you started on further research): Hooks in no upper body control - Protect your neck with the "V" "prayer" position , flare your legs out ...


9

I'm in construction and like to grapple in my spare time. I read somewhere on here someone recommended Horse Stall Mats.. thats a no-no.. falling on Vulcanized rubber is like landing on concrete, but you get a nice skid burn on top of that. I saw someone else say to make your own out of plywood, styrofoam, carpet underlay foam and drape your own vinyl... ...


9

A lot of the sources from which people draw that "most fights go to the ground" are fatally flawed in one way or another. UFC fights are not like real world engagements. Your priorities in a UFC fight are to win the mutual engagement, your priority in a real world engagement is frequently to not be there as expeditiously as possible (at least if you are ...


8

there are a few things you can do to help with this: break down your opponents posture, it's very hard, if they are sitting tall, even for someone with normal/long legs to keep the guard closed. use your legs to draw them in, and lock up their upper body, this keeps them closer, and makes it easier to keep your guard closed. develop a good open guard ...


8

Stop planning your eventual wall of black belts and go get a blue belt in BJJ or a brown belt in judo or join a SAMBO school or join a wrestling club. Worry about integrating your grappling into your striking after you have some grappling skill. Try a class at each of the grappling schools in your area, pick the one with the highest quality teachers and ...


7

Great question. Think of all the categories of fighting as different spokes on a wheel. If you are equally poor in all categories, your wheel is small, and you may move smoothly, but you won't move far, at least not quickly. If you are completely missing spokes, these are points at which your wheel falters, and you have a rougher ride. Which is better? To ...


7

@WayneInML is right... This is the "40 ninja in trees armed with automatic weapons and a nuclear device" question – you can always provide enough circumstances to counter an argument. The only sure-fire, 100% reliable way to survive is to not be there. Don't engage idiots, listen to that oh-so-obnoxious sub-conscious of yours that tells you walking down ...


7

Things that I have found help me with specifically wrist locks, but some of which are adaptable to other forms of practice as well. Grab a Partner for an Extra Day This is really the best option, but also logistically the most difficult. Talk to the other students in your class and see if one of the more experienced ones would be willing to add an extra ...


6

Assuming you are on the ground and someone has your back and hooks in, is there a defense to a rear naked choke? Not everyone is going to agree with me here, I can guarantee that. I am not familiar with competition rules for BJJ, but I understand them to be fairly liberal, with the exception of small joint locks and soft-tissue mauling. With hooks in, ...


6

The main thing to understand is that your are in charge of how you train. So if you would like to train light contact, or no contact at all, you should be able to. If your club does not respect that, they are not worthy: Martial Arts nowadays is not as it used to be in terms of need. We need it less for warfare and more for self-defence. As different people ...


6

Visit a couple of dojos that interest you and ask about their injury record. Look for older students; once you cross 50, injuries count more and heal slower. Moreover you're more likely to have other injuries that complicate your practice. Ask about training with injuries, and "opt-out". I can no longer do kneeling work, and when I visit a new dojo I ...


6

One of the major differences between the 'illegal' moves and the 'legal' moves is that the legal moves have fairly previsible responses. If you poke someone in the eye, you're not quite sure what their response will be. If you bridge, no matter the opponent's response, you're probably (no pun intended) on much more comfortable ground. To go one step deeper ...


6

I do BJJ/grappling and stand up jujitsu, and I've discovered the following works best for long hair: Pull your hair into a tight, low ponytail on the side of your head, not straight back, else when you grapple it will get trapped under your head on the ground. Quickly braid the hair and secure with a second band! It's nowhere near the work of the full ...


5

While I understand the desire and even need these days to be frugal, I would be very careful buying mats from a Dollar Store or Box Store like Wal-Mart. Safety is of greatest concern. I have also used the gym style folding mats as mentioned above and they are problematic in that they do not stay together but easily slide apart when using them. Your best ...


5

For same day weigh ins, cutting a lot of weight is not ideal, and it will affect your performance. That being said, if you are weighing in early in the morning, and competing later in the afternoon, you will have some time to properly rehydrate and recover. This question talks about some techniques that are out there: Dropping weight before a MMA fight ...


5

As this is an extremely broad question, it befits an extremely broad answer. Any technique can be applied with varying degrees of success, whether armed or armored. Much of the kuden of the Bujinkan for instance is related to the sameness of arms and armor, and how techniques do not necessarily change with respect to equipment, and ultimately the goal of ...


5

There are no good solutions. Long hair gets in the way of training unless knotted or braided, and even then it is liable to wiggle free and get in the way during hard training. All external tools--nets, headbands, bandanas, caps--are liable to come off. Well-executed braids and buns are slightly more reliable, but frequently come out anyway. You must ...


4

Train in grappling. Sorry, but a grappler will almost always win out against a non-grappler. Just ask just about any TKD student who's sparred a BJJ student. Or, for that matter, the evolution of MMA and the UFC when Gracie and other grapplers won time and time again for several years, until people started adding it into their styles. The thing about ...


4

I have a shoulder brace recommendation, but before I give it, I will explain why I don't think it's going to do what you want it to as far as the muscles are concerned. Your stated injury is in the SITS muscles which are what comprise the rotator cuff. Only one of the muscles actually produces motion of the limb in a plane, the primary function of these ...


4

Assuming no-gi and they're starting with right knee down and left knee up. Plant your left foot on his right hip, it makes it pretty hard for him to get rid of it or pass, and since your foot is on his hip it gives you something to push off of to swivel and get an angle. Your right leg should also be somewhere on his torso, but since it's going to move the ...


4

Maintain 3 points of contact, i.e. head control, arm control and foot on the hip opposite of the leg that is up. Take your foot that is not on the hip and make sure your knee is touching their leg near the thigh, hook their ankle with your foot, pull them toward you to off balance them and kick their leg out (just like they are taking a stride while running, ...


4

@stslavik's answer hit it on the money, but I wanted to give my two cents, alongside his. I know you didn't use these words, but basically, there's no real "anti-grappling" that isn't, truthfully, just grappling. I have a couple things that I'd like to recommend if you want to avoid being put in a grappling situation, though: 1) As @stslavik said, avoid ...


4

At a guess, any of the Escrima/Kali guys that like the dog brothers. http://dogbrothers.com/ Their sparring is geared for a semi no rules with weapons ( often wearing protective gear similar to armour ) see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CELN-DQI5qc


3

Unfortunately for you, unlike grappling which can be used without any striking ability to neutralise striking, there's no way to use striking to neutralise grappling. The only way to deal with a grappler is if you can grapple yourself. If your focus is on avoiding getting taken down, you can train a takedown centric art. Judo would be the most likely one ...


3

Good Luck If your not-getting-stabbed relies on your not-engaging-in-any-form-of-clinch, then I'd hire a combat medic to follow you around, because chances are you're going to have some stab wounds. We don't always get to choose where the fight goes. Our sprawl might fail, we might get caught by surprise, our knee or punch or debilitating nerve strike ...


3

Grappling dummies have their place and are useful. But like you said they are no substitute for a real body. I must preface this with the fact that they only grappling dummies I've used are the ones with no legs or arms that are really only mean for dragging around, picking up, and working ground and pound. and they are good for that. As for grappling ...


3

Your best bet is to buy them used from a tournament like grapplers quest. They bring in new mats for every tournament, and sell them after at a steep discount. A lot of tournaments re-use their mats though, so this might not be an option in your area. Do not attempt things like take downs on the cheap mats you can get at the dollar store, or even ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible