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7

What's what all the wrist grabbing? In violent situations (as opposed to competitive situations), your assailant is likely to grab you. Grab and hit is one of the most common attacks. Being number 2 behind the haymaker according to the statistics I have seen. Also grab and stab btw. If you have a guard or fence raised they'll grab it to control and ...


3

A crossface is a way to gain positional control of an opponent while working from side control (side control is also called cross side or side mount). The gist of it is that you are driving shoulder pressure into the chin of your opponent to mitigate his/her mobility. More specifically, using a crossface helps prevent your opponent from turning toward you so ...


3

There are plenty of grappling attacks that start from wrist grabs. Wrist grabs are a basic element of eliminating your opponent's attack/defense. It's much easier to attack if you can move the opponent's arms out of the way. Wrist control is one way to start this. Examples: Jimmy Pedro (judo) on grip fighting with wrist control wrestling takedowns more ...


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I would like to offer an answer from traditional aikido point of view (Iwama ryu/Takemusu). There are lot of grabs on body or clothes: kata dori, kosa dori, hiji dori, morote dori, riote/hantai dori, katate dori, mune dori, sode dori, eri dori and so on, plus grabs from the back ushiro eri dori, ushiro kata dori.... you get the picture. Grabs are ...


2

I hypothesize that it is an outgrowth of sword culture. In a CQC situation, a common tactic would be to control the opponents sword hand (preferably before they can even draw a weapon). A lot of disarming techniques begin with a wrist grab to prevent the weapon from being brought to bear against you. The holistic approach to martial arts would include ...


2

Baratoplata and Kimura hurts the same joints and area Shoulder. It means both submissions are to same result but with different variations. In the same way of the Arm bar/arm lock. This submission hurts the elbow and could be apply for guard, mount, back, inverse and also from inside the my opponent guard (not usual) The history of Kimura: The kimura ...


1

Crossface has no translation in bjj. It is a position when you force the head of your opponent to one side using your forearm or shoulder on the face of him. This position could be from side control, half guard, back, mount and defense of take down. Crossface is very common nowadays to protect the single leg. When your opponent attack your leg. Using the ...



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