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9

I assume you are working on the arm bar known in judo as juji gatame. The principle in this technique is the use of a class 2 lever to hyperextend the opponent's elbow joint. Resistance is in the middle, at the opponent's elbow joint. Force is applied by pulling down at the wrist and raising the hips. The fulcrum should be one of your legs; this makes any ...


7

What's what all the wrist grabbing? In violent situations (as opposed to competitive situations), your assailant is likely to grab you. Grab and hit is one of the most common attacks. Being number 2 behind the haymaker according to the statistics I have seen. Also grab and stab btw. If you have a guard or fence raised they'll grab it to control and ...


7

I prevent testicle crushage while armbarring my partners and opponents by: Pulling the arm further towards my head, so their elbow is across my pelvis and not my crotch Squeezing my knees tighter on their upper arm Wearing underwear (or lack thereof) that provides freedom of movement, so that they can move out of the way of an elbow mid-attack Not giving a ...


6

One of the first things that came to my mind, even before Brazilian Jiujitsu, was Harimau Pencak Silat. It can be seen in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GkXXv02YR8 The Harimau ("Black Triangle") style of Silat is modeled on the movements of the tiger and has a specialization in ground fighting. One of its primary strategies is to take someone ...


5

I've been training Bjj since 1998. I always learned to squeeze my knees to prevent this pain on testicles. This is the most common way to avoid this kind of injury. But this year, when I was visiting the academy of the Master Sylvio Behring, he taught me a different approach for the arm lock (arm bar). Squeeze your knees early. He told me to close my knees ...


5

Yes, Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, for example, use legs to lock and choke opponents. Sankaku jime, also known as the triangle choke, is a popular technique where the legs are put into a figure-4 position around the neck and arm of an opponent. The legs are used to both immobilize and choke the opponent, and arm locks can be performed from this position as ...


4

The kimura, omoplata, and barataplata are all attacks on the shoulder. The end result is the same but they apply the attack in different ways. I'll do my best to describe each attack below, but these descriptions would make a lot more sense if you accompany each one with an image of the attack (probably just a quick google image search would be good ...


3

Before going too far be aware that strategy should also be about dealing with uncertainty. Nothing ever goes perfectly to plan. Every good wrestler who is not being flippant about the opponent will think & plan about the match. This can be as simple as sizing up the opponent, watching them in other matches or many other ways to assess and then plan. For ...


3

A crossface is a way to gain positional control of an opponent while working from side control (side control is also called cross side or side mount). The gist of it is that you are driving shoulder pressure into the chin of your opponent to mitigate his/her mobility. More specifically, using a crossface helps prevent your opponent from turning toward you so ...


3

I would like to offer an answer from traditional aikido point of view (Iwama ryu/Takemusu). There are lot of grabs on body or clothes: kata dori, kosa dori, hiji dori, morote dori, riote/hantai dori, katate dori, mune dori, sode dori, eri dori and so on, plus grabs from the back ushiro eri dori, ushiro kata dori.... you get the picture. Grabs are ...


3

There are plenty of grappling attacks that start from wrist grabs. Wrist grabs are a basic element of eliminating your opponent's attack/defense. It's much easier to attack if you can move the opponent's arms out of the way. Wrist control is one way to start this. Examples: Jimmy Pedro (judo) on grip fighting with wrist control wrestling takedowns more ...


3

I can't comment as a new user, but this technique is IBJJF legal for everyone except kids under 12. The banana split is usually reached fom the Truck, but there is a lot in common between it and the Electric chair submission. If you watch the last match between Eddie and Royler, Eddie gives a textbook exhibition of the Electric Chair.


3

Both are grappling fights. Jiu jitsu can be splitted in two divisions. Gi and NOGi. Luta livre (some times called Submission) is just NOGi. This is a vantage for Luta Livre (they focus in just one style). The techniques are the same. But Jiu Jitsu nowadays is much more focusing in competition/sport and in my opinion Jiu Jitsu is losing the fight idea. ...


3

To my knowledge, Luta Livre and BJJ are practically the same, the only difference is that in Luta Livre you don't wear a Gi. Both systems use belts for graduations, although in Luta Livre you don't wear it during fights. Due to not having a Gi in Luta Livre, it is understood that some techniques are slightly adjusted to fit the circumstances. Some more ...


3

Baratoplata and Kimura hurts the same joints and area Shoulder. It means both submissions are to same result but with different variations. In the same way of the Arm bar/arm lock. This submission hurts the elbow and could be apply for guard, mount, back, inverse and also from inside the my opponent guard (not usual) The history of Kimura: The kimura ...


2

I hypothesize that it is an outgrowth of sword culture. In a CQC situation, a common tactic would be to control the opponents sword hand (preferably before they can even draw a weapon). A lot of disarming techniques begin with a wrist grab to prevent the weapon from being brought to bear against you. The holistic approach to martial arts would include ...


2

I've trained in many martial arts schools. There have always been one or two individuals that didn't know their own strength or who simply had some kind of mental issue that caused them to scare everyone else in the class who had the misfortune of partnering up with them. And I'm not even talking about sparring. It could be a nice, smooth, flowing, ...


2

I hope this is helpful on your journey. I have a dummy called the Submission Master. For me it has been an asset, since it can go into guard position and I can work on reps to practice passing the guard. There are merits of having a dummy and I believe the benefits outweigh the flaws. For example, a person who is not very dedicated may say, "I don't have ...


2

I have very long hair and I'm a wrestler so I usually wear my hair in a French braid in a pony tail. The braid works better at keeping hair out of your face.


1

Crossface has no translation in bjj. It is a position when you force the head of your opponent to one side using your forearm or shoulder on the face of him. This position could be from side control, half guard, back, mount and defense of take down. Crossface is very common nowadays to protect the single leg. When your opponent attack your leg. Using the ...


1

I have 2 judo dummies. A 100 pound one and a 120 pound one. They say that a 120 pound dead weight dummy is equal to a 200 pound man. They are great for multiple throws without a partner. It gives you a good aerobic exercise. Use a weight belt around the dummy for ease of lifting it up again for another throw. Also good for wing chun practice too.


1

It's not really about reading up on strategies but developing your own strategy for what works for you. When you're starting off in grappling/wrestling, you're going to primarily defending when going against higher levels. As your skill increases, you will be more on the offense. I'm a BJJ practictioner, I've seen even with my teachers, the strategies are ...


1

Among the other excellent answers, I figured I'd mention Capoeira. Capoeira tends to deemphasize the use of hands in its attacks for historical reasons (depending on who you ask, either due to fighting in shackles or simply because it became "the way things are done"), so many of its techniques are done with the legs or hops. It also doesn't have a huge ...


1

Some judo, Sambo, and BJJ players specialize in jumping into chokes or armlocks from standing. It's called a "flying armbar" or "flying triangle". See this example from MMA, this example from BJJ/submission grappling or this example from judo.



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