Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Stop planning your eventual wall of black belts and go get a blue belt in BJJ or a brown belt in judo or join a SAMBO school or join a wrestling club. Worry about integrating your grappling into your striking after you have some grappling skill. Try a class at each of the grappling schools in your area, pick the one with the highest quality teachers and ...


6

I do BJJ/grappling and stand up jujitsu, and I've discovered the following works best for long hair: Pull your hair into a tight, low ponytail on the side of your head, not straight back, else when you grapple it will get trapped under your head on the ground. Quickly braid the hair and secure with a second band! It's nowhere near the work of the full ...


5

There are no good solutions. Long hair gets in the way of training unless knotted or braided, and even then it is liable to wiggle free and get in the way during hard training. All external tools--nets, headbands, bandanas, caps--are liable to come off. Well-executed braids and buns are slightly more reliable, but frequently come out anyway. You must ...


5

As this is an extremely broad question, it befits an extremely broad answer. Any technique can be applied with varying degrees of success, whether armed or armored. Much of the kuden of the Bujinkan for instance is related to the sameness of arms and armor, and how techniques do not necessarily change with respect to equipment, and ultimately the goal of ...


4

At a guess, any of the Escrima/Kali guys that like the dog brothers. http://dogbrothers.com/ Their sparring is geared for a semi no rules with weapons ( often wearing protective gear similar to armour ) see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CELN-DQI5qc


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


3

For many years, I trained with long hair, and I have to say, it was quite a hassle to deal with. I oftentimes tied my hair back in a ponytail. However, I have fine hair, so strands had a tendency to get loose and get in my eyes. I found that hairspray helped quite a bit (though I occasionally had problems with it hardening and still coming loose). If you ...


2

Poke eyes, squeeze balls, stab with knife etc. Are you sparring? Then sure, if you want to be able to grapple back you need to learn how to. But if this is real life then there are no rules - only openings and defence. Wrestling would be a horrible way to take on someone with a knife. Punching and kicking would be a horrible way to take on grappling. Arm ...


2

You can work on isolation drills where hair-pulling isn't allowed. This will allow you to train without the hassle of putting your hair up. For example, you could work on your standup skills, stopping and resetting the drill when someone hits the mat. It might even be fun and beneficial for you to work only boxing or only kickboxing from time to time. ...


2

Good armor will protect the user against a lot throws. The protection is provide not only from impact resistance of the armor, but also the additional mass, and size the armor gives to the body. Multiple that by two if both are in armor. By way of example, and speaking somewhat generally: The arm cannon (forearm, elbow & upper arm as one piece) will ...


2

I would say that if having long hair is so important to you then you should practice with it being in your face. The point of drills is not only to teach you what to do when things go right, but how to react when things go wrong, e.g. you get slapped in the eye by a lock of sweaty hair and now you can't see. Or do you want to wait until your hair comes ...


2

I tried this solution out and it works. Tie you hair in a pony tail put a bandana or buff over your head with the hair inside so that it is not hanging out. Put a mma/wrestling ear guard over your head covering the front part of the buff/bandana, and the rear part holding it firmly on your head This holds the hair under the cloth so that it doesn't rub ...


1

All people (myself, other men and women) I train with use the same thing: knots. Either the "samurai" knot or a hair plait that is then secured with elastic bands. Have a look at this Hair Tutorial : How to do a Bun for a starter. This is the best way I found not to have tori step on uke's hair after a break fall. I experimented with a tenugui (tied a la ...


1

Hair nets might be an option for you. But I think those are going to be too loose and would come off too easily during grappling. Same with headbands. How about a swimming cap like one of these? http://www.amazon.com/Speedo-Silicone-Long-Hair-Black/dp/B000F6E2JE They make them out of stretchable silicone, spandex, and so forth. It might look a little out ...


1

the team with all its fighters knocked down loses. Sounds like judo would be a good choice indeed. Everything in the first video suggests that the decisive portion of the fight was most frequently in the clinch, but still at arms length. Judo and SAMBO, being jacket wrestling arts, are ideally suited for this range of combat. From the video, it appeared ...


1

I would think that Kendo is an obvious one. Especially since at its core, it teaches you to command the center and make your opponent open himself up before striking. This principle translates well into almost any art. Also, it teaches sword fighting. And don't knock fencing. It's surprisingly potent.


1

If you want to start with a mixture of striking and grappling you should go to an MMA school where this is likely to happen but your grappling will develop slower than by joining a grappling school. On the other hand you could join: BJJ, Sambo, Wrestling or Judo depending on what you're more interested in ground work or throws. After gaining some skill you ...


1

Learn to fight before learning dirty tricks Luis Gutierrez has a nice article about the differences between street and sport martial arts: "Just add dirt" I can hear it now from all the street fighters... "But Luis, what about eye gouges, hair pulling, biting, ripping, pinching, scrotum striking, yanking and smashing, scratching, spitting, foaming ...


1

I would recommend training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, it's as simple as that. By training in BJJ up to blue belt level you will know how to keep safe and survive in locks and submissions, keep the fight off the ground and learn how to get off the ground if you are taken down or thrown. Although most people haven't trained in grappling they still know how to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible