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9

I assume you are working on the arm bar known in judo as juji gatame. The principle in this technique is the use of a class 2 lever to hyperextend the opponent's elbow joint. Resistance is in the middle, at the opponent's elbow joint. Force is applied by pulling down at the wrist and raising the hips. The fulcrum should be one of your legs; this makes any ...


7

I prevent testicle crushage while armbarring my partners and opponents by: Pulling the arm further towards my head, so their elbow is across my pelvis and not my crotch Squeezing my knees tighter on their upper arm Wearing underwear (or lack thereof) that provides freedom of movement, so that they can move out of the way of an elbow mid-attack Not giving a ...


6

Since Muay Thai is a sport that doesn't allow takedowns or grappling it doesn't contain countermeasures for theses kind of attacks. Neither does for example boxing. If a muay thai fighter tries a take down (repeatedly) they will be disqualified. That said Muay Boran and Krabi Krabong are martial arts that do seem to contain certain aspects of fighting on ...


6

One of the first things that came to my mind, even before Brazilian Jiujitsu, was Harimau Pencak Silat. It can be seen in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GkXXv02YR8 The Harimau ("Black Triangle") style of Silat is modeled on the movements of the tiger and has a specialization in ground fighting. One of its primary strategies is to take someone ...


5

Yes, Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, for example, use legs to lock and choke opponents. Sankaku jime, also known as the triangle choke, is a popular technique where the legs are put into a figure-4 position around the neck and arm of an opponent. The legs are used to both immobilize and choke the opponent, and arm locks can be performed from this position as ...


4

A calf slicer is a compression lock that crushes the calf muscle, and I've heard the terms "calf crush", "calf slicer", and "calf crank" all used interchangeably. At 2:00 of this video, Eddie Bravo describes the Vaporizer as a "toe hold slash calf crank, slash devastation...this one is very hard to resist." (Emphasis mine.) So there's an element of calf ...


4

As a submission it's mainly a groin / hamstring stretch - effectively forcing your opponent into a "splits" type position. It's been a go-to move of mine from under half-guard for a while, be aware that those with good flexibility won't tap so be prepared to switch to the sweep.


4

I'm training Bjj since 1998. I always learned about squeeze my knees to prevent this pain on testicles. This is the most commun way to avoid this bruises. But this year. When I was visiting the academy of the Master Sylvio Behring, he taught me a different approach for the arm lock (arm bar). Squeeze your knees early. He told me to close my knees when my ...


3

Both are grappling fights. Jiu jitsu can be splitted in two divisions. Gi and NOGi. Luta livre (some times called Submission) is just NOGi. This is a vantage for Luta Livre (they focus in just one style). The techniques are the same. But Jiu Jitsu nowadays is much more focusing in competition/sport and in my opinion Jiu Jitsu is losing the fight idea. ...


3

To my knowledge, Luta Livre and BJJ are practically the same, the only difference is that in Luta Livre you don't wear a Gi. Both systems use belts for graduations, although in Luta Livre you don't wear it during fights. Due to not having a Gi in Luta Livre, it is understood that some techniques are slightly adjusted to fit the circumstances. Some more ...


3

I can't comment as a new user, but this technique is IBJJF legal for everyone except kids under 12. The banana split is usually reached fom the Truck, but there is a lot in common between it and the Electric chair submission. If you watch the last match between Eddie and Royler, Eddie gives a textbook exhibition of the Electric Chair.


3

In a calf crank the movement is in line with the foot-ankle-shin structure, while in the vaporizer it's not: this creates torque on the hip/knee/ankle joints, which is a movement pattern not found in a calf crank. This twisting motion is found instead in many other submissions such as the toe hold, heel hook, kimura and omoplata. You might think of the ...


3

From my dim understanding, BJJ's electric chair can include a straight kneebar or twisting leglock element, but the primary aim is to sweep, or to submit with a hamstring or groin stretch.


2

I have very long hair and I'm a wrestler so I usually wear my hair in a French braid in a pony tail. The braid works better at keeping hair out of your face.


2

Define "grapple and take down". Some Muay Thai practitioners do a lot of clinch work, but generally takedowns are highly circumscribed. Techniques like hip throws, shots, suplexes and so on are are forbidden and defenses to such techniques are not generally practiced.


2

I hope this is helpful on your journey. I have a dummy called the Submission Master. For me it has been an asset, since it can go into guard position and I can work on reps to practice passing the guard. There are merits of having a dummy and I believe the benefits outweigh the flaws. For example, a person who is not very dedicated may say, "I don't have ...


2

Most martial arts are not balanced... like how BJJ lacks the striking power, yet so strong in ground games, and the other way around for Muay Thai. Since there are no take downs in Muay Thai match rules, they don't teach it much. You can either learn techniques to counter takedowns, learn ground arts from BJJ, Judo, etc. after being contented in Muay Thai, ...


1

Among the other excellent answers, I figured I'd mention Capoeira. Capoeira tends to deemphasize the use of hands in its attacks for historical reasons (depending on who you ask, either due to fighting in shackles or simply because it became "the way things are done"), so many of its techniques are done with the legs or hops. It also doesn't have a huge ...


1

Some judo, Sambo, and BJJ players specialize in jumping into chokes or armlocks from standing. It's called a "flying armbar" or "flying triangle". See this example from MMA, this example from BJJ/submission grappling or this example from judo.


1

It's not really about reading up on strategies but developing your own strategy for what works for you. When you're starting off in grappling/wrestling, you're going to primarily defending when going against higher levels. As your skill increases, you will be more on the offense. I'm a BJJ practictioner, I've seen even with my teachers, the strategies are ...


1

Muay Thai has a lot of clinch techniques, both offensive and defensive. K1 Muay Thai reduces and sometime forbids them, but there are hip, supplex and other throws while clinching to get free from opponents techniques. Buakaw Benchamek vs Enrico Kehl match has a lot of examples. Definitely no ground game, the refree will always stop the match and let both ...


1

I have 2 judo dummies. A 100 pound one and a 120 pound one. They say that a 120 pound dead weight dummy is equal to a 200 pound man. They are great for multiple throws without a partner. It gives you a good aerobic exercise. Use a weight belt around the dummy for ease of lifting it up again for another throw. Also good for wing chun practice too.


1

As for training, every solution you want to try should also take into consideration protective equipment. Specifically: For grappling, Cliff Keen makes an accessory to its headgear. I have tried it personally and it works fine, but it's quite hot. For striking, use a headband for bag/mitt work and shadow boxing, use your boxing headgear when sparring. If ...


1

Use an ear guard. That will hold your hair back



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