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6

My general advice for those wanting to learn on their own when there are no local schools available to train at is this: Find two or three friends who also have an interest in learning and training together. You each decide on a remote school to train at. This should be a well recognized school and instructor. Once you have a remote school in mind, write ...


5

Since Muay Thai is a sport that doesn't allow takedowns or grappling it doesn't contain countermeasures for theses kind of attacks. Neither does for example boxing. If a muay thai fighter tries a take down (repeatedly) they will be disqualified. That said Muay Boran and Krabi Krabong are martial arts that do seem to contain certain aspects of fighting on ...


4

You really should check out some of the "Stick Grappling" videos on Youtube. There are plenty. Also, look specifically for anything you can get by the "Dog Brothers". Most of the stick grappling videos you'll see are going to be by people who have combined Filipino escrima / kali with Brazilian Jiujitsu. This is okay, but keep in mind that most of what ...


4

A calf slicer is a compression lock that crushes the calf muscle, and I've heard the terms "calf crush", "calf slicer", and "calf crank" all used interchangeably. At 2:00 of this video, Eddie Bravo describes the Vaporizer as a "toe hold slash calf crank, slash devastation...this one is very hard to resist." (Emphasis mine.) So there's an element of calf ...


3

In a calf crank the movement is in line with the foot-ankle-shin structure, while in the vaporizer it's not: this creates torque on the hip/knee/ankle joints, which is a movement pattern not found in a calf crank. This twisting motion is found instead in many other submissions such as the toe hold, heel hook, kimura and omoplata. You might think of the ...


2

Define "grapple and take down". Some Muay Thai practitioners do a lot of clinch work, but generally takedowns are highly circumscribed. Techniques like hip throws, shots, suplexes and so on are are forbidden and defenses to such techniques are not generally practiced.


2

The answer to this question really depends on: What training you have Where you are fighting (what terrain, obstacles, etc. is around you) Every form of self defense has different options they specialize in. Jujitsu and Judo folks will get around the person's back and lock them up. Some folks will catch a thumb or get a wrist lock. Boxers will play ...


2

My Answer Today Given my judo and lifting training right now, I feel comfortable defending against throws by an untrained opponent. I feel less confident trading strikes. Therefore, I would stay outside striking range, maintaining distance using footwork plus an occasional leg kick, front kick, jab, or push kick as appropriate. If the attacker persists I ...


2

From my dim understanding, BJJ's electric chair can include a straight kneebar or twisting leglock element, but the primary aim is to sweep, or to submit with a hamstring or groin stretch.


2

Most martial arts are not balanced... like how BJJ lacks the striking power, yet so strong in ground games, and the other way around for Muay Thai. Since there are no take downs in Muay Thai match rules, they don't teach it much. You can either learn techniques to counter takedowns, learn ground arts from BJJ, Judo, etc. after being contented in Muay Thai, ...


1

Muay Thai has a lot of clinch techniques, both offensive and defensive. K1 Muay Thai reduces and sometime forbids them, but there are hip, supplex and other throws while clinching to get free from opponents techniques. Buakaw Benchamek vs Enrico Kehl match has a lot of examples. Definitely no ground game, the refree will always stop the match and let both ...


1

The work of Chris Petrilli are my go-to resource for stick grappling, particularly locking and throwing. I have not run across many people with his depth of knowledge in this specific area, and he fuses several arts together to make a devastating and beautiful art. https://www.paladin-press.com/category/s?keyword=petrilli I could not be more pleased with ...


1

Grappling dummies are most useful for a ground work not for take down training. From what is available on the market submission master is most realistic grappling dummies available Part of what makes it so good is the fact that its arms and legs are stiff enough to be realistic and also to return back to their original position, but also elastic enough to ...



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