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7

I do BJJ/grappling and stand up jujitsu, and I've discovered the following works best for long hair: Pull your hair into a tight, low ponytail on the side of your head, not straight back, else when you grapple it will get trapped under your head on the ground. Quickly braid the hair and secure with a second band! It's nowhere near the work of the full ...


6

There are no good solutions. Long hair gets in the way of training unless knotted or braided, and even then it is liable to wiggle free and get in the way during hard training. All external tools--nets, headbands, bandanas, caps--are liable to come off. Well-executed braids and buns are slightly more reliable, but frequently come out anyway. You must ...


5

My general advice for those wanting to learn on their own when there are no local schools available to train at is this: Find two or three friends who also have an interest in learning and training together. You each decide on a remote school to train at. This should be a well recognized school and instructor. Once you have a remote school in mind, write ...


4

You really should check out some of the "Stick Grappling" videos on Youtube. There are plenty. Also, look specifically for anything you can get by the "Dog Brothers". Most of the stick grappling videos you'll see are going to be by people who have combined Filipino escrima / kali with Brazilian Jiujitsu. This is okay, but keep in mind that most of what ...


3

For many years, I trained with long hair, and I have to say, it was quite a hassle to deal with. I oftentimes tied my hair back in a ponytail. However, I have fine hair, so strands had a tendency to get loose and get in my eyes. I found that hairspray helped quite a bit (though I occasionally had problems with it hardening and still coming loose). If you ...


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

I would say that if having long hair is so important to you then you should practice with it being in your face. The point of drills is not only to teach you what to do when things go right, but how to react when things go wrong, e.g. you get slapped in the eye by a lock of sweaty hair and now you can't see. Or do you want to wait until your hair comes ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


2

I tried this solution out and it works. Tie you hair in a pony tail put a bandana or buff over your head with the hair inside so that it is not hanging out. Put a mma/wrestling ear guard over your head covering the front part of the buff/bandana, and the rear part holding it firmly on your head This holds the hair under the cloth so that it doesn't rub ...


2

Good armor will protect the user against a lot throws. The protection is provide not only from impact resistance of the armor, but also the additional mass, and size the armor gives to the body. Multiple that by two if both are in armor. By way of example, and speaking somewhat generally: The arm cannon (forearm, elbow & upper arm as one piece) will ...


2

You can work on isolation drills where hair-pulling isn't allowed. This will allow you to train without the hassle of putting your hair up. For example, you could work on your standup skills, stopping and resetting the drill when someone hits the mat. It might even be fun and beneficial for you to work only boxing or only kickboxing from time to time. ...


1

Grappling dummies are most useful for a ground work not for take down training. From what is available on the market submission master is most realistic grappling dummies available Part of what makes it so good is the fact that its arms and legs are stiff enough to be realistic and also to return back to their original position, but also elastic enough to ...


1

The work of Chris Petrilli are my go-to resource for stick grappling, particularly locking and throwing. I have not run across many people with his depth of knowledge in this specific area, and he fuses several arts together to make a devastating and beautiful art. https://www.paladin-press.com/category/s?keyword=petrilli I could not be more pleased with ...


1

Have you tried cutting it? There is a reason most people who are serious about the martial arts shave their heads (Krillin, Shaolin monks, bald dudes with beards and tattoos) Serious answer: I have not seen anyone do anything successful about long hair. It sucks for your training partner too when they gi grip and they realize they've got a chunk of your ...


1

All people (myself, other men and women) I train with use the same thing: knots. Either the "samurai" knot or a hair plait that is then secured with elastic bands. Have a look at this Hair Tutorial : How to do a Bun for a starter. This is the best way I found not to have tori step on uke's hair after a break fall. I experimented with a tenugui (tied a la ...


1

Hair nets might be an option for you. But I think those are going to be too loose and would come off too easily during grappling. Same with headbands. How about a swimming cap like one of these? http://www.amazon.com/Speedo-Silicone-Long-Hair-Black/dp/B000F6E2JE They make them out of stretchable silicone, spandex, and so forth. It might look a little out ...


1

I would recommend training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, it's as simple as that. By training in BJJ up to blue belt level you will know how to keep safe and survive in locks and submissions, keep the fight off the ground and learn how to get off the ground if you are taken down or thrown. Although most people haven't trained in grappling they still know how to ...


1

There's this funny modern thing - the division between grappling or not grappling. For combative situations, you hit, you grab, you twist, you throw - you do anything that works. Historically, fighting arts had both (and weapons). So, ok, here you are, you've gotten mostly training in striking. You want to learn some grappling. You don't need to do a ...


1

Two hands in at all times no matter what and shrimp your way out. Don't push with your hands. The position is similar to the thai clinch. This has saved me from being subbed from black belts so many times!


1

the team with all its fighters knocked down loses. Sounds like judo would be a good choice indeed. Everything in the first video suggests that the decisive portion of the fight was most frequently in the clinch, but still at arms length. Judo and SAMBO, being jacket wrestling arts, are ideally suited for this range of combat. From the video, it appeared ...


1

You pull their wrists down after doing that your chin shoots down to your chest whilst your shoulder shoot up. You can then start to take their hooks out if you are on the ground if standing up hip throw.



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