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10

Generally (though this is often mis-taught), any sort of fingertip striking is done to the soft tissues of the body, a notable exception being thumb tip striking which may attack bone. You'll notice the way the body must be positioned in each regard to the twisting of the hand to strike palm up, palm down, or palm perpendicular, which hints at positioning ...


5

A - Elements of good punch Hit with your shoulder not hand (focus on the shoulder and not the peripherals). Hips turning in the direction of the attack Rear leg pushing hips in the direction of the attack (on ball of the foot) Position of front leg should be enough to hold you in place and not falling forwards or becoming stuck in place. As a general rule: ...


4

Yes, that is the final movement of "the walk" - I'm drawing a blank on the Japanese name. Quick google search indicates that some schools call that "taiso", but (a) we've never used that term (b) that term seems to refer to something more general, and (c) our school has always called it "the walk". You can see a version of it in this video around the 42 ...


4

The Hung brothers, Hung I-mien and Hong I-hsiang, differed on their expressions of baguazhang and xingyiquan. Both men had trained under the same teacher. Hung I-mien, being smaller and whipcord thin, picked up his feet. He tend to dance around in unpredictable directions and taught the forms that way to his students. Hung I-hsiang, on the other hand, was ...


4

IMVHO, reasons like "getting power from the ground" (or similar) are usually given by someone who either doesn't have a good explanation for the practice or does not want to tell you the real reason (either due to complexity or insufficient rank). Yes, there is a bio-mechanical advantage to be gained from correct leverage of the leg/foot against the ground, ...


4

What is a good method to make sure that the material is being adequately covered in a small class? I am fortunate in my training that I haven't just learned from one instructor, but have studied under at least a dozen different instructors at different times. There are two approaches that I saw, and my approach was born out of a combination. 1) The ...


4

I'm a big guy. I had a hard time with this. What really helped me was when the instructor (by happenstance) saw me doing this. Do the technique wrong, start pushing to get it right, keep pushing harder. How he helped me was: I was taught the phrase, "If you are "trying" to do it, you are doing it wrong." He watched me, and as soon as my instinct said ...


3

The best way is for them to feel those locks done to them with that minimal amount of pressure. Otherwise, I remember reading this idea for push hands which may be useful: We do push hands with force - because the simplest way to get to the real push hands drill is to be too exhausted to do it wrong. So, if the students are too tired to put the force ...


3

I think this nicely illustrates the mental conflict between drills and practical application. Consider one of the key points of a high spinning kick (taekwondo in my case but the commonality with hapkido is obvious): a high spin draws your upper body down and away from your target. Obviously, the movement of your upper body will differ based on flexibility ...


3

Kondo Sensei (Tomiki Aikido, check wikipedia for his vitals) says that the reason we slide our feet rather than lifting them is that when you lift your feet you give up a bit of balance. I would rephrase this to say that you cannot lift your foot unless you have no weight on that foot; that means for that instant your balance is focused on the weight ...


3

As a student and teacher of Aikido (obviously not Hapkido, so take with as much salt as you see fit), my inclination would be to introduce this as early as possible. Moreover, I think you've provided the answer yourself: There seems to be a natural tendency with people learning wrist locks to put their force toward their own index fingers while letting ...


3

From your description, I believe that your breathing is similar to what we did when I studied Northern Shaolin Kung Fu Wu Su. The way that we were taught how to breath was actually through a breathing exercise we would do every start of the class as part of our standard warm-up routine. Laying on our back with our hands lightly touching our abdomen below ...


3

The founder of judo, Jigoro Kano, recognized this trade-off between "deadly" or severely damaging techniques and our ability to practice these techniques to a useful degree. The situation has improved with technology. Today we have good goggles, MMA and boxing gloves, and steel cups, so if we want to train out ball punches, nukites to the eye, striking, ...


2

Shaolin has some conditioning training. (They have all sorts of conditioning training). I don't know if it is worth the time to strengthen fingers to be able to jam into people. At least, it is not for me. I've heard of people with iron finger and hand skills to have shortened fingers. Though I'm not a professional musician, I make my living by typing, not ...


2

Thanks to Mark C. Wallace's answer, I can see what you mean. This is a very old version of the fifth movement of tegatana doza as can be seen demonstrated by Scott Allbright sensei here. Tomiki was trying to abstract a lot of the moves in Ueshiba's Aikido into some simple moves that could be done as drills. This lead to tegatana doza as it is practised ...


2

In both Tomiki and Yoshinkan aikido, when we teach the relevant techniques, we do teach them to emphasize the pinky fingers and to avoid (over) using the index finger. We teach that not from a ki perspective, but from an effectiveness perspective. Specifically with respect to wrist grips and lapel grabs I've been told more than once to grip with my pinky. ...


2

Every martial art has its own philosophy which influences what is emphasized. That philosophy is in turn influenced by: Terrain of the region it grew up in Available weapons (including strikes as weapons) The martial arts of the surrounding areas (i.e. common enemies) If the terrain is a loose gravel, or many unpredictable sink holes in the ground, ...


2

From my experience with iaido, sliding the foot along the ground is actually just the first level of a more complex skill which involves expanding your energy forward from the hips (and sliding the legs back involves compressing your energy). The movement actually comes from the hip and is expressed in the foot. This changes rather drastically the power ...


2

I don't believe your "advanced basics" are a set of techniques, but rather an application of a hapkido principle called Hwa (화), which is a principle of non-resistance, to your fundamentals (kibon sool). This can be thought of as similar to applying the "joining" principle in aikido or aikijujutsu, in that when the opponent pushes, you move in the direction ...


2

A conditioning method Chinese fighters (used to) use, is spear-thrusting your hands into a pot/bag of beans repetitively. The idea here is to have some counter-pressure on your fingertips per strike, but not too much as it would when striking a single solid surface. Just like training muscles or bones, the fingertips grow stronger by just slightly damaging ...


2

From the time that we're born, we're trying to counter forces pulling us down by resisting. Why on earth would you expect new students to do any different just because you explain it to them? It's innate. @Trevoke has a great point: When a student has no ability to fight back any longer, they can learn to blend with the energy. When I first started learning ...


2

I'm aware of Tang Soo Do and at least some forms of Karate having a spinning heel kick, but beyond the Korean martial arts and Karate, I'm not aware of any (though it seems likely that there is at least a related move in Capoeira and some styles of Kung Fu). In Alex Gillis' A Killing Art (a heavily sourced origin of modern Taekwondo), Gillis relates an ...


2

It helps to have an established curriculum or progression through your system. Your system does sound like it has that, but perhaps something was simply missed or perhaps there isn't a structure of progression of the things that people need to learn. With a huge breadth of material to learn, a way to cover those teachings is to drill out the fundamentals ...


1

So far as my knowledge reaches, I can only answer the first part of your question. Yes, there are many arts which practice the spinning kick. My favorite: Capoeira. The "back spinning heel kick" is generally known as "Armada"—variations may apply. The "back spinning hook kick" is known as the "Gancho"—again, variations may apply across schools


1

The techniques you describe are two separate techniques in Taekwon-do, at least in ITF Taekwon-do. The spinning heel kick is called bandae dollyo chagi and the spinning hook kick is called bandae goro chagi. Since Hapkido is a Korean martial art it may have its roots in Taek Kyon which as far as I know was mainly a kicking art which was also one of the ...


1

Moon Hwan Lee set up a taekwondo school in Australia in the '70s, and it's grown independently since (under his direction) - notably not incorporating many changes which happened in Korea during the late '70s and '80s. We have a kick which we call spinning-hook kick or spinning-heel kick which is identical to the backspinning hook kick described. The heel ...


1

The challenge I am seeing is in making sure that, in the course of the class, the students are getting sufficiently exposed to the breadth of the material while not losing focus on the depth of their individual understanding. As an example, we recently we realized that a 4th kup had basically never seen a set of techniques that we taught for a long while ...


1

In many ways, what comes natural to us may not be natural to others. And vice-versa. As such there will be techniques you have to learn and teach that might not be great for you, but will be for your student. When it comes to the spinning techniques, my "grand-sensei", if you will, was a natural at them. My direct sensei much less so. And I am even less ...


1

Hook kick is very beneficial as both a "stealth technique" and if you have bad aim with a side kick. Start by throwing a side kick that misses the opponent such that your foot is in front of his head (heel points to his head, toes point to the audience). If the side kick was high enough, and far enough from his head, he probably blocked the kick with a low ...


1

Everything you say is fairly accurate. There is one very interesting further use case, which expands on your idea of balance and muscle coordination - If you think of that sequence of movements as two-player drill, you can begin to examine it in a different light. Theoretically: this particular low-spinning heel strike might be a follow-up to a high parry ...



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