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11

First, you need to ask your instructors and senior students about anything you see them turning their noses up to. Do this reflexively. Always ask why. If they have no good answer for you, other than that they just don't do it, then that's your answer. Otherwise, this is the sort of question that will lead to a much better understanding of Brazilian ...


6

I find wristlock throws to sometimes be frowned upon because they are somewhat dangerous due to the speed with which they must be applied to be successful, and their unfamiliarity. Unfamiliarity can be fixed, just like leglocks are currently undergoing a normalization process in the community, or like wristlocks-as-a-submission are better recognized in BJJ....


6

Most throws in BJJ descend from western wrestling, or Judo. In both of these arts, the focus is on taking the opponents balance. Resisting one of these throws does not matter much: if someone is good, you can strain all you like against their seio nage, but basic physics cannot be violated, and if your balance is taken you will end up safely thrown to ...


3

Its never to late to start martial arts as a hobby. If you should have higher hopes to do that on a professional level, it depends a lot on which martial arts you want to do. There are several cases in mixed martial arts where people became professionals, even though they started relatively late, even some of them with no prior martial arts expierence. ...


1

I started Judo at 40 with my sons. Now i'm 1D and i keep training for 2D. We are numerous in my intitute in that case. And we participate contests for senior older than 40


1

I started Tang Soo Do at the age of 25 having never done any martial arts prior to that. In all honesty I've never been very active prior to that. It is never "too late" to start practicing, but the earlier you get in on it the better for your body. I'm not a huge guy, not super muscular, nor am I fat. However 25 years of not really training or being ...


1

I've been training in Hap Ki Do for over three years and cross training in Judo for maybe 6 months or so, I'm currently 34. Don't worry about getting into shape before you start training, training along with a good diet and you'll get into shape in no time. When I started Hap Ki Do, I was about 230-ish pounds, so quite out of shape, considering I'm about ...


1

As a MMA practicionner with 20 years of combat sports, here's my 2 cents/ideas : kicking practice helps keeps legs strong, FLEXIBLE and AGILE (very important) the fact that 'they are rarely used' does not mean u can't use them if your good enough not to get caught when throwing them (therefore you really need to practice) A kick can be as effective as ...


1

The only real value in learning the mechanics of big, spinning, haymaker attacks is being able to accurately gauge an opponents telegraphs and punish them accordingly. Mechanically speaking, these techniques tend to be slow and overpowered. Thus, their practicality is low for use against a non-compliant opponent. Plus, it is always, always, always a bad idea ...


1

You cannot condition your hands to make combat effective spear-hand attacks, with or without risk of injury. Hand conditioning is a bad idea in general (I spent years abusing my own body in pursuit of such an edge). Mechanically, and realistically, there is nothing to be gained from trying to jab your straight fingers at an opponent with the full force of a ...


1

Looking at the use of nukite in karate katas has led me to the belief that you simply should not use a spear hand as a strike. There isn't a single example of it being used as a strike against an opponent in any of the kata I practice, though there are examples of what appears on the surface to be spear hand strikes (and they are often trained that way). All ...



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