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34

Go and have a look at all the clubs around where you live. Train once or watch a session. Then pick the one that has the best instructor, the more friendly students, and the one you had the most fun with. Style is second to whoever is teaching you, to whomever you train with, and to however much fun it is. All in equal measures.


26

Cutting off cerebral blood flow (CBF) to the brain via a blood choke can be very dangerous and should not be conducted in a training session. Properly 'tapping out' is vital when practicing choke. Windpipe (air) chokes involve compressing the trachea which as stated above derive the entire body of air this should also not be done in training under normal ...


23

Everything that's physically challenging carries the chance of injury. Deal with it. Running risks joint degeneration. Bicycling can be bad for sexual function and mobility. Hikers get lost and freeze to death. Tennis causes elbow pain. Soccer players blow out their knees. Baseball players risk concussions from wayward pitches to the head. Lifting weights ...


17

Worth making the distinction between a blood choke and a air choke. ie, are you cutting off the air ( through the throat) or the blood (through the arteries). Throat choking is a lot more dangerous because of the damage you can do to the actual throat. Can cause swelling, etc and can cause people to die some time later. Blood chokes, less dangerous, ...


17

I don't think the science is settled to a degree where we can give a solid answer, or make too many specific conclusions. Disclaimer: I'm not a kickboxer, and I haven't studied the subject deeply. Dementia pugilistica Getting hit in the head is not good for your brain. Getting hit a lot in the head is very bad for your brain. That's true regardless of ...


16

and I expected him either to break free or to tap out. When I looked down at him... There would have been a physical sign that your instructor had lost consciousness, like his muscles relaxing and possibly a slight change in posture. You need to be considerably more aware than you were. You cannot always rely on your training partner to know when to tap ...


15

A wrestler will say wrestling, a bjj player will say bjj, a muay thai fighter will say muay thai. But to be fair, they are all right. There isn't really one specific art that is better then the other for a base. I know, some people will argue with me for this, but if you look at the current state of mma, there are champions with a wide assortment of ...


15

There are two types of chokes: a blood choke, in which blood flow to the brain is, at least temporarily, halted; and an air choke, in which compression to the trachea or chest stop airflow into the body, and thus oxygenation of the blood. Both are inherently dangerous. During an air choke, excessive pressure can lead to the collapsing of the trachea or ...


13

Studies Where We Choked People Unconscious In a Lab Being choked out might not be good. But we have very little evidence that shows that it's bad to any significant degree, and considerable evidence that being choked out doesn't seem to be of notable danger: There has been limited medical research regarding neck restraints. One of the first studies was ...


13

Young male, not looking for anything specific, but I am a huge fan of MMA in general. You just answered your own question: try something that has already caught your interest. It's not at all hard to find a school in your area. Look some up and check them out.


13

Yes! Martial arts can help you with posture, improve you overall fitness and stamina, and give you the discipline to do things correctly. No! There are much better ways to get a good posture and behaviour while working at a desk than joining a martial art class. You can see a physiotherapist, get a new chair, have a work station safety analysis done, take ...


12

St John Ambulance has a page containing advice on treating nosebleeds. Specific points relating to stopping a nosebleed quickly are: Advise them not to speak, swallow, cough, spit or sniff because this may disturb blood clots that may have formed in the nose. Ask the casualty to breathe through their mouth (this will also have a calming effect) and ...


9

As mentioned in this and other answers to that question one of the biggest things you can do to help your knees are progressively more difficult bodyweight squat variations or barbell/dumbbell squats (preferably with help of a trainer). These have a direct impact on the muscles that are responsible for stabilizing the knee, and done correctly they are ...


9

Classifying tai-chi-for-health What are we talking about when we talk about forms-based tai chi? Evaluating the practice as an ignorant outsider, it's essentially a slow dance. There are a number of one-footed balancing postures, deep lunges or otherwise low stances, and opportunity to stretch the limbs as well as flex and extend. In addition to the ...


9

Aikido sounds like something you should check out. I would seek a ki-aikido school, if such existed where you lived based on your comment on "spiritual peace". Aikido generally relies on re-directing the attackers' momentum (and creating opportunity to do so) to either throw or pin. Technique is more important than strength and I have seen tiny females ...


8

As a former LAPD police man who went through academy training in the early 70s, I can give testimony about the bar arm control hold and its effects, on other police cadets and myself as well. We were taught to know what to do when gaining consciousness, how to identify by hearing, where our main threat was (man with a gun) and how to proceed. Naturally in ...


8

All martial arts—if properly understood—can lead to "spiritual peace" (that's in quotes because in context, this would mean [the second half of] "calm"; but explaining that is a whole chapter of a book). Examples Ju Do "judo" (the gentle way). Understand its concepts and you need not exert any strength at all. Tai Chi: Understanding the forces of nature ...


7

I want to make sure I hit every part of this, so I'm going to make heavy use of quotes here... First, we need to answer an unasked question: What is pain? This is important first off since, in order to work through pain, you have to understand pain. Pain is a nervous-system response to intense or damaging stimuli. When someone strikes you, your body ...


7

Not to sound terribly flippant or dismissive, but the best way to build up to doing a stance is to do the stance. When we perform a specific activity, we engage the muscles necessary for that activity. If you want, for instance, to effectively chop wood, then you should chop wood. This also serves the secondary purpose of building up your neural pathways to ...


7

The biggest risk with concussions is getting a second one shortly after the first. For competetive boxers and kickboxers, this means the 10 count and standing 8 count are sentencing them to long term brain damage. If you're training casually, wearing very good headgear (Winning FG-2900 if you can afford it, Rival d3o would seem to be a good second choice) ...


7

The main thing to understand is that your are in charge of how you train. So if you would like to train light contact, or no contact at all, you should be able to. If your club does not respect that, they are not worthy: Martial Arts nowadays is not as it used to be in terms of need. We need it less for warfare and more for self-defence. As different people ...


7

Visit a couple of dojos that interest you and ask about their injury record. Look for older students; once you cross 50, injuries count more and heal slower. Moreover you're more likely to have other injuries that complicate your practice. Ask about training with injuries, and "opt-out". I can no longer do kneeling work, and when I visit a new dojo I ...


6

Since you're basically asking for anecdotes, here's a third hand account of a technique used by a purported 80+ year old Korean war veteran who still runs marathons. Ice bath. Yup, after your exercise, you take a bath full of cold icy water. OK, so it's not from martial arts exactly, but it seems sufficiently anecdotal. I think you'll find lots of cultures ...


6

Dit da jow is a classic. There are a variety of recipes, each supposedly for a different purpose. The stuff we use at the school seems pretty good for reducing bruising, and is a mild pain-reliever on par with Arnica Montana (neither is as good as Tylenol, IMO). I've seen it available from an acupuncturist I tried once, but I didn't get any from her.


5

As an EMT I would have you sit down and lean forward where your elbows were supported on your knees. With a clean rag or paper towel try to compress your nostrils, or pinch them closed if not to painful. This will prevent blood form going back into your throat and allow it to pool in the nostrils and form a clot. Depending how bad it is it should stop ...


5

After getting my nose broken I had perpetual nose bleeds for about a month, I usually had about one each day that would just spring up randomly. My brother was training to be a paramedic at the time, so he knew how to deal with it and taught me. Presumably as it was from his paramedic training, it's well researched. 1: Look down, not up. You don't want the ...


5

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


5

After surgery, there is a period of time you have to let your body heal. Your physician will schedule several follow-up visits to check on the progress of the healing. During that time, let your body heal. Martial arts can wait. After that period of healing your physician will clear you for all normal activity. This means everything from general ...


5

This seems like a tough question to answer to me because "health" is a vague term and it begs to be compared to other things. I would think one advantage forms based tai chi would have over the other things you mentioned (running, strength training) is an additional mental discipline / meditative aspect that would contribute to mental health and well-being ...


5

This is actually a very valid question. Consider that the NFL (U.S. football) is now going through a kind of falling out period whereby the athletes are becoming more and more aware of the growing risk of chronic brain injury over time. In the UFC, we're starting to see some questions regarding brain injury rates as well. And for a long time, we've known ...



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