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7

All martial arts—if properly understood—can lead to "spiritual peace" (that's in quotes because in context, this would mean [the second half of] "calm"; but explaining that is a whole chapter of a book). Examples Ju Do "judo" (the gentle way). Understand its concepts and you need not exert any strength at all. Tai Chi: Understanding the forces of nature ...


6

Aikido sounds like something you should check out. I would seek a ki-aikido school, if such existed where you lived based on your comment on "spiritual peace". Aikido generally relies on re-directing the attackers' momentum (and creating opportunity to do so) to either throw or pin. Technique is more important than strength and I have seen tiny females ...


5

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


5

This is actually a very valid question. Consider that the NFL (U.S. football) is now going through a kind of falling out period whereby the athletes are becoming more and more aware of the growing risk of chronic brain injury over time. In the UFC, we're starting to see some questions regarding brain injury rates as well. And for a long time, we've known ...


4

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


4

The best thing i can say is to strengthen you shin and calf muscles a lot. This can help prevent future injuries. Start doing calf raises and if you have some sort or wrist or ankle weight (or a dumbell if you can balance it) that you can put on your foot and bend your foot up and down to work your shin muscles. I do not know the extent of your injury so ...


3

Anecdotally, Judo can be absolutely brutal on your body: After years of dedication to judo it gave me a black belt (first dan) and unparalleled skills at taking anyone down. It also gave me: 1) Osteoartheritis on all my fingers from GI gripping 2) Pinched nerve in my neck 3) Bad lower back from not wanting to fall on my back and lose by ...


3

Knee instability is usually as a result of one of two things - You either have a pre-existing injury that is contributing to the instability, or you have muscle weakness that is contributing. (This is assuming no congenital defects). For the first, you may have to supplement with braces and/or corrective surgery. While you can protect the area with proper ...


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


2

I'm not sure what you mean about the spiritual part since out of your post I would understand it's health and confidence related. Mostly all martial arts training increases self-confidence. I'd say the biggest boost in confidence is gained by training in something as close to reality as possible. At least in my opinion you should choose a form of martial ...


2

This answer is mostly just in support of the others... Muscle strength is the best way to overcome a relatively minor knee problem and avoid future injuries. I partially tore my ACL about 10 years ago and had constant knee pain until I started spending 3 to 4 hours a week practicing Tang Soo Do. Four specific exercises that greatly strengthen legs and ...


2

Taekwondo, especially, seems to be a great destroyer of knees. Pretty much everyone I know at high levels in the art has experienced knee injury at some point. I think this is because of the right angles the stances and footwork place your feet at. Because of the way that TKD movements are structured, placing weight on the heel of the foot during a pivot ...


2

Toughen up. It's a bruise. You'll stop getting bruised after doing it a few months. I've never heard even the suggestion that there are long-term negative health effects of this kind of mild conditioning. If you don't want to get bruised, or if you suspect that bruises are indicative of some deeper danger, then kickboxing is not a good choice for you. If ...


2

Take a martial art that is very 'realistic' to be spiritually self-fulfilled. The realization that many of the techniques that you learn gets used by people who put themselves in a cage to fight other people with these techniques, makes you realize that they have enormous confidence in their techniques, that they're teaching/sharing with you. Live sparring ...


2

"The problem however is that I have very little self confidence in my own health and strength. I catch colds easily, and can't eat all types of foods, etc etc." This is a profound personal observation with regard to your training as a martial artist. Most martial art schools you may train in will naturally address these concerns as a matter of course, by ...


1

I think you can answer two-way to your questions. 1st, long term risk to your body depends on how you train. If you have bad habits, and you apply useless strain on your body, it WILL catch up to you (at 40 some morning I feel like I have the knees and the back of a 60's). But its also part my fault. My mom ( who was also my 1st coach) always told me to ...


1

I know exactly how you feel. Pre martial arts I lacked confidence and felt very vulnerable in some situations. (Also being 6ft and 90kg). I found 'Modern Kenpo' a number of years ago. It is very streetwise and is incredibly good for building confidence and awareness when out and about. It is as much a way of life as a martial art. Now I teach the art ...


1

Some techniques and training do not stress the joints, others do. It depends on the martial art, the teacher and the kind of training. For example, a lot of judoka end up with bad knees. Likewise a lot of capoeira folks end up with back injuries. Joint damage can be understood in 3 factors: Too much stress, bad applied If you try to do too much force ...


1

The following answer is based on my personal experience and information I have gained in 10 year of martial arts practice. I hope it will be of use. As many other sports, martial arts also fall into the category of 'impact sports'. Indeed the joints are stressed not as much by practices such as shadow boxing but by striking hard surfaces as for instance ...


1

Pre-communist legit taijiquan can bring a buttload of health benefits but in reality, it was designed really for combat. Seriously. Look up about the original "taijiquan" which came from the Chen family. And the mentioned founder of the family combat system: Chen Wangting. He was a general of the late ming dynasty. If you saw the fact of how he was able to ...



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