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5

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


5

This is actually a very valid question. Consider that the NFL (U.S. football) is now going through a kind of falling out period whereby the athletes are becoming more and more aware of the growing risk of chronic brain injury over time. In the UFC, we're starting to see some questions regarding brain injury rates as well. And for a long time, we've known ...


4

First of all, I think you can shop around in your local area and try to find schools that share your mindset. Chances are there are some. You just have to talk with the instructors and see what the classes are like. I'm not exactly sure how karate has changed over the years to become more violent, as you noticed. To me, it looks like it hasn't changed at ...


3

Suddenly we are told we can't do that As mentioned by Wudang Kid, whaaaatt??!!! Nobody - absolutely nobody - can tell you to not practice any specific kata etc. Even if you are practicing a specialised form that someone has protected as their intellectual property, the most they can do is stop you from teaching it to others (i.e. they can stop you from ...


3

Anecdotally, Judo can be absolutely brutal on your body: After years of dedication to judo it gave me a black belt (first dan) and unparalleled skills at taking anyone down. It also gave me: 1) Osteoartheritis on all my fingers from GI gripping 2) Pinched nerve in my neck 3) Bad lower back from not wanting to fall on my back and lose by ...


3

Knee instability is usually as a result of one of two things - You either have a pre-existing injury that is contributing to the instability, or you have muscle weakness that is contributing. (This is assuming no congenital defects). For the first, you may have to supplement with braces and/or corrective surgery. While you can protect the area with proper ...


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


2

This answer is mostly just in support of the others... Muscle strength is the best way to overcome a relatively minor knee problem and avoid future injuries. I partially tore my ACL about 10 years ago and had constant knee pain until I started spending 3 to 4 hours a week practicing Tang Soo Do. Four specific exercises that greatly strengthen legs and ...


2

Taekwondo, especially, seems to be a great destroyer of knees. Pretty much everyone I know at high levels in the art has experienced knee injury at some point. I think this is because of the right angles the stances and footwork place your feet at. Because of the way that TKD movements are structured, placing weight on the heel of the foot during a pivot ...


2

What is a concussion? In the last few years we've gotten a lot more info on them, and literally, they are brain damage. What makes them especially dangerous is that concussions can be extremely unpredictable in terms of cause to effect - sure, getting hit harder in the head is worse, but sometimes lighter hits can cause severe concussions or heavier hits ...


2

Cold/hot flush Here's a trick I learned from a coach & sports medicine expert - after a workout, soak cold for 10 minutes then soak hot/warm after. I started doing that and found my own soreness reduced by 2/3rds (of course, pain is subjective so...) He typically dumped his players into a tub with ice, I'm not as hardcore so I just use a cold bath ...


1

I think you can answer two-way to your questions. 1st, long term risk to your body depends on how you train. If you have bad habits, and you apply useless strain on your body, it WILL catch up to you (at 40 some morning I feel like I have the knees and the back of a 60's). But its also part my fault. My mom ( who was also my 1st coach) always told me to ...


1

Pre-communist legit taijiquan can bring a buttload of health benefits but in reality, it was designed really for combat. Seriously. Look up about the original "taijiquan" which came from the Chen family. And the mentioned founder of the family combat system: Chen Wangting. He was a general of the late ming dynasty. If you saw the fact of how he was able to ...


1

Some techniques and training do not stress the joints, others do. It depends on the martial art, the teacher and the kind of training. For example, a lot of judoka end up with bad knees. Likewise a lot of capoeira folks end up with back injuries. Joint damage can be understood in 3 factors: Too much stress, bad applied If you try to do too much force ...


1

Cycling is by far the best rehabilitative exercise for any part of the leg. It's low-impact ( or rather, non-impact) and doesn't put any limbs at odd angles. A pedal you can clip into will ensure that you work your ligaments on both the up- and down stroke.



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