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6

While it is essential that you get enough protein (and calories by the way) in your daily diet if you want to build muscle, it turns out that the timing of it is not important at all. Studies show that consuming protein right before, after, or during a weight-training workout doesn't gain you anything. This is despite what you've heard from weightlifters and ...


5

Yes, playing judo introduces the risk of brain injury. Judo is a contact sport. Competitive judo is a very contact sport. If you play rough and don't take ukemi properly, you risk concussion. The risk is not as great as in boxing or striking arts. The risk is manageable for nearly all trainees, especially people who don't compete at the elite levels or who ...


4

Based on this NYTimes article: The frequency of judo deaths in Japan gives 108 deaths since 1983. I will not paraphrase the article but other nationality report no deaths in the last decade or so. I am going to assume that those deaths were directly resulting from judo and not just happened while judo was going on. Thus your risk of dying are increased if ...


4

You should not expect to see a study that tries to quantify the effect of martial arts on lifespan. There are too many variables involved in this process: genetics, diet, sleep patterns, stress, environment, other exercise, etc. And while it is possible to determine what kills you, there is not a corresponding causation for what keeps you alive. The number ...


3

After a judo class I'm more concerned with getting carbohydrate for glycogen depletion than I am with protein for muscle growth. A mix of both after class is fine. However, it's good to be skeptical of supplements and protein powders. They are above all a heavily-marketed consumer product for which advertising is trying to convince you that you need. Most ...


2

The All Japan Judo Federation basic instructor course is 2 days of lectures followed by essay questions (at least when I took it last year). There is an extensive section on head injuries, as almost all the deaths mentioned above were as a ressult of head trauma. Primarily multiple blows to the back of the head by unsupervised children, but also, rarely by ...


1

No, well-taught martial arts don't. Injury can. The following suggestion is made sight unseen, and does not constitute medical advice or diagnosis. I say it because you describe a postural change I have observed many times in the past, with a common cause; other/different causes are certainly possible. The posture you describe corresponds to a postural ...


1

You should read "A Tooth from the Tiger's Mouth: How to Treat Your Injuries with Powerful Healing Secrets of the Great Chinese Warrior" by Tom Bisio. This book is about healing from the perspective of the Chinese martial arts and generally covers topics in sports medicine. The topics discussed in the book include: Ice is for dead people. It may reduce ...


1

Taiji and other meditative practices teach deep breathing, which has been scientifically linked to health benefits. Taiji will provide these benefits without the potential health problems that accompany meditation practices requiring long periods of sitting. Sympathetic nerve activity is decreased during device-guided slow breathing Effect of short-term ...



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