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10

See the translation of Taekwondo entry in Japanese Wikipedia. According to this article, in 1940s during the Japanese rule of Korean Peninsula, Karate (空手) was taking hold under the name Kongsoodo (공수도, 空手道) and Tangsoodo (당수도, 唐手道). To backtrack on these namings, we need to understand the origin of Karate. Sakukawa Kanga (佐久川寛賀) from Ryukyu Kingdom ...


8

Sorry I'm not able to give a more academic answer to your question. As a former black belt in TKD and a bit of a martial arts history buff, I took an interest in this question myself at one point in my past. Here are my observations and thoughts on the matter. Taekwondo forms used to be entirely from Shotokan karate. This comes about because many Koreans ...


8

I seem to have been thaught a story similar to what Sardathrion explains, yet slightly different. Sadly, though, I have no reference other than "my sensei told me". According to my sensei, people wore the left side on top because the inside of the kimono became easily accessible with the right hand, a bit like a big pocket, allowing to dissimulate weapons ...


7

Gi, or more properly dōgi (道着) is wafuku (和服), or Japanese Clothing, and the handedness (for lack of a better word) of kimono is that it is worn with the left panel over the right. It is mostly out of tradition, likely with roots in the the codification of Shintō traditions in which an order of things must be observed (for instance, when praying at a Shintō ...


6

I've only started practicing Payattu*, and the students did try to convince me that such a technique exists. Of course there is no way laws of physics can be bent in such a manner, this technique is a myth. I did try to find out where these stories came from. First you have to understand that Payattu is thousands of years old (9th century CE). This ...


6

The claim From Kalaripayattu Bangalore's website: Marmas are the specific points in the body where the application of pressure or insertion of needles (Bhedan karma) will effect the flow of vital energy or Prana along a complex system of subtle channels calls Naadis. A knowledge of such specific points is called Marma Shastra. Marmam has three ...


6

It is said that the first female instructor was Takako Kunigoshi. She was one of the first women to train under Ueshiba Sensei and started in January 1933 at what is now the Hombu Dojo. She trained there with another woman, but I don't know her name. Later she was asked to teach self-defense to other women. More information can be found here and here


5

This is about the Bodhidharma Shaolin Kung Fu myth. There is no legitimate evidence for Kung Fu or Shaolin Kung Fu coming from India or Kalari being the oldest martial art or first martial art in the world and wrestling(for example in cave paintings in Mongolia), grappling, stone chinese swords were there in prehistoric times. Bodhidhadharma taught ...


5

As far as I know the left side over right is for the living. Dead bodies get kimono tied right over left. Some sources include wikipedia and Japan Zone for example. So, unless you are an undead, there are no exceptions.


4

Traditional Kung Fu doesn't have colored sashes, as they traditionally had the sole purpose of holding up the pants. For the most part, colored sashes are a Japanification of the ranking systems. Rank in traditional Kung Fu also doesn't follow the same general pattern as Japanese arts either, as titles are familial based, not rank based (sidi = younger ...


4

Interesting... I very much like @DaveLiepmann's answer, and agree with his message if not always his way of saying it. I do want to expand a little on it. Reality vs. Non-Reality Without getting into hundreds of years (Possibly thousands) of philosophical debate on what is and what is not real, let's consider Objective vs. Subjective reality. For ...


4

Fake professional wrestling grew out of one of the oldest martial arts tradition: the challenge match. Chinese martial artists sometimes fought on the lei tai to establish dominance over teach martial arts in an area: ...and it was common in feudal Japan for students of one school to invade another school and demand a match. Fighting is at the heart of ...


4

NullPointer, it's a parable and it's either (a) impossible or (b) just a case of the guy healing & the doctors being wrong. Just a parable; there is no single guy this is based on. I believe the lesson is a little less than what you state; that a positive attitude can help you overcome obstacles including healing, but not necessarily to do the ...


4

It is borrowed/taken from various other arts (rifle/bayonet, spear(yari), and specific jo arts) with the founder of Aikido then blending/creating his "Aiki jo" art. Stan Pranin of Aikido Journal (formerly AikiNews) has written: The exact origins of the Aiki Jo remain somewhat of a mystery. Some have found traces of Morihei Ueshiba’s jo movements in ...


3

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


2

This is an inspiring article about belt rankings. http://www.minrec.org/wilson/pdfs/History%20of%20Belts%20and%20Ranks.pdf Speculative tradition proposes that belt colors (as indicators of rank) originated in a peculiar habit of washing all of one’s training clothes except the cloth belt. Thus as training progressed the initially white belt would ...


2

CAC, the French name for Close Combat, was replaced by Technique d'Intervention Opérationnelle rapprochée (TIOR), apparently somewhere around 2002. This is taught throughout the branches of the French military. Judging by what I can understand from École Interarmées des Sports Notice T.I.O.R., training appears to prohibit striking to the head, but ...


2

Agh heck, I'll post this as an answer: It may be something akin to button sides. This may explain the difference in death as well, as few corpses dress themselves (zombies excepted, of course ;). http://www.primermagazine.com/2010/field-manual/why-do-men%E2%80%99s-and-women%E2%80%99s-shirts-button-on-different-sides Mens’ buttons are on the right side ...


2

Just because somebody comes from a certain lineage does not mean he is a good teacher or has certain skills. Lineage charts are pointless as they encourage people to believe that an instructor is a good one just because of his lineage. What about the guys who don't have this fancy lineage? Are they bad teachers? Are they lesser martial artists? It doesn't ...


2

According to "just another judo page", the first woman judoka was Sueko Ashiya, who started training in 1893, which (if true) would be 11 years after the official founding date of the art: First female Judo students started to train in Kodokan in late years of 19th century. First Kodokan female student was Sueko Ashiya in 1893 and joshi-bu (woman's ...


2

See this question: What is Qi power and has it been proven to exist scientifically? Again, these "pressure points of spiritual energy" are places on your body where important blood vessels and/or nerve clusters exist. E.g. punching someone below the ear and behind the jaw will hurt like a mother and possibly make him pass out. This is simply because you ...


1

From my understanding, and this is an un-sourced comment from my instructor (Aikikai), the jo represents a rifle/bayonet combo. If you consider that O-Sensei developed Aikido during various wars (largely formalized pre-WW2), this makes a lot of sense. However, I have no sources, so this is faith in my instructor on my part, and pure speculation for the ...


1

Takako Kunigoshi is a possibility; she started training in 1933. Edith Margaret Garrud started studying Judo in 1899; combine that with Dr. Liepmann's answer below, and it appears that women started studying Judo in both Japan and Europe at about the same time, which is somewhat surprising.


1

one art, two halves, standup, and ground. Rare is the judoka who can master both. To be called a master, you must master both, that's my take. yup two black belts in two different arts, only then are you a true jiu-jitsu man, or Judo man if you prefer. When it comes to winning for its own sake, the newaza way is more practical, and actually easier to ...


1

This is a video on the Bodhidharma myth and it also has information on ancient martial arts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6kwYocMnIo This video shows how old martial arts are and that they have existed since prehistoric times around the world. It shows that there are Chinese martial arts which predate Bodhidharma and the Shaolin Temple. This video debunks ...


1

The earliest document I'm aware of is Ch'i Chi-Kuang's "Essentials of the Classic of Pugilism". He studied 16 martial arts and combined them in a 32-step forum for troop training. A number of martial arts can be traced back to that book. Douglas Wile in "Tai Chi Ancestors" makes a good case for the book being one of the foundations of Tai Chi Chuan.



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