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8

I totally agree on the pedantry stuff, and i think that it is really depending on what each person thinks about it. For me, a kind of Martial Art has a tradition, a specific form or style or is following certain rules. I believe that there is also some kind of beauty in those 'Arts'... I personally would even go further and divide Martial Arts and Combat ...


7

For oldest, please refer to What is the oldest documented Eastern Martial Art that is still practiced? and What is the oldest martial art?. Also see What qualifies a school or business as a legitimate martial arts system? In general, there is no formal certification or approval process for martial arts. There may be rank systems within an art like karate or ...


7

Similar to Sardathrion's answer the definition on Wikipedia is Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development. I and several members of the MA project there ...


6

The Oxford dictionary defines martial art as Various sports, which originated chiefly in Japan, Korea, and China as forms of self-defence or attack, such as judo, karate, and kendo. Merriam Webster defines martial art as any one of several forms of fighting and self-defense (such as karate and judo) that are widely practiced as sports And ...


4

According to Wikipedia, it was introduced to the UK by Edward William Barton-Wright in 1898.


4

If we're talking umbrella terms, I tend to think of martial arts as anything that is a codified system of movement which currently, or has roots in the past, of being used for combat. This covers everything from currently combative focused methods, to sports, to cultural practices. There's a lot of waving around "true martial arts" but I think it's totally ...


3

This is an excerpt of the commentary from Bagua Linked Palms by Wang Shujin (pp. xxi-xxii) , with translation and commentary by Kent Howard and Chen Hsiao-Yen. This describes Dong Haiquan, the source of modern bagua. Modern scholarship has brought a more critical eye to bear on both Dong's life and the development of Bagua Zhang. Through extensive ...


2

I heard about Glima. Have a look... https://youtu.be/z7UfuzVbI4A and http://www.viking-glima.com/combat.html There is also another site about historical long-sword fighting aka Historic European Martial Arts: http://www.hemac.org/


2

I think it's worth noting that jō is sometimes translated to English as "cane". While it doesn't match up in shape and size to a classic European cane, it does match in purpose. Another interesting fact about the jō is that it's also the size of the haft of a farmer's spear: in the feudal period of Japan, a commoner couldn't keep a full-length yari, but was ...


2

Half swording. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Half-sword There is no space in a basket hilt to use two hands, so the second hand would be on the blade. It became more common with all swords as armour improved.


2

Asian Fighting Arts by Donn F. Draeger and Robert W. Smith is a good survey of martial arts from Asia. The original, published in 1969, is a little dated, but should give you an idea of the history, content, and weapons used by Asian martial arts systems. This was republished as Comprehensive Asian Fighting Arts in 1980. I don't know how the content of the ...


1

This is a vast undertaking... Tomiki's On Modern Jujutsu paper is not a bad place to start for how Aikido and Judo evolved from the myriad of old Japanese ryu. It breaks down ancient jujutsu into four categories: Nage-waza (throwing techniques) Katame-waza (locking techniques) Atemi-waza (striking techniques) Kansetsu-waza (joint techniques) I would add ...


1

A martial art is the practise of any exercise where the goal is to defeat an opponent through the application of physical force directed against them. There are many martial arts, it's the very broadest of terms, but they can often be broken down further into more specific categories. Such as combat sports. They are still martial arts, but the emphasis of ...


1

The clue is in the term 'martial art'. Martial, relating to military and combat, art relating to its original meaning in the English language, where art was not necessarily the subjective thing it is now, art in this sense means skill set. So 'martial art' means a set of skills used for combat in time of war. Of course the language has changed, and how we ...


1

Historically speaking, there wouldn't be much overlap between the us of the half-swording technique and the advent of the basket-hilted sword. Half-swording was typically used with a longsword by heavily armored combatants. The basket-hilt arose once technology had advanced to the point that heavy armor began to fall out of favor. The basket-hilt itself ...


1

On this site, I see differentiation of self defense from martial arts, with self defense being more what I would expect in seminar classes (avoidance, understanding crime) rather than years-long study. Refer to Which martial arts focus on self defense?. I am generally confused about the jargon applied to this classification as well.



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