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Truthfully there are three: iaido, kendo, and battou-do. They differ on their focus or in their origination. iaido. The art of sword drawing. All katas begin and end with the sword sheathed. In some ways you could liken it to preparedness at all times, not just in battle. kendo. The art of of sword fighting. In modern kendo, there is an emphasis on ...


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The main difference between the two is that Kendo is a competitive sport, whereas Iaido is more of a traditional art. Since Iaidokas often practice without a real opponent (katas) they don't use any protective gear. Iaido beginners usually start with wooden swords and then progress up to blunt metal blades (intermediate), and then to sharp blades (only very ...


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Generally, there are a few points in which the sword will differ between arts. The history and mythology (or oral tradition) of the evolution of the Japanese sword (from ken or tsurugi to tachi to katana) spans thousands of years. Generally, differences may be caused by: Locality – The available material sources at the time may have led to a design out of ...


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To clarify a couple of points in other answers: Weight: lighter bokken feel rather different to a katana. As already noted, you can do techniques with a kendo shinai that are not possible with a katana unless you are Conan the Barbarian! This is due to the light weight of the shinai vs a katana. A heavier bokken will be closer to the weight of a katana and ...


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The exact answer would depend on which specific styles/lineages your talking about. (And there I am not able to provide specific info.) But a general answer would be the difference is the meaning of 'do' versus 'jutsu'. Iaido would be a "way"; practicing for self-betterment being the more primary intent. Iaijutsu would be "martially effective"; practicing ...


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Bokken are both training tools and weapons in their own right. The suburi bokken comes from the legend of Musashi. As the story goes, he was crossing a river on a boat to go to the duel of his life when he realized he didn't have his katana. He fashioned one of the oars into a sword. It was heavy, but Musashi was well renowned for his strength. He, of ...


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Likely the most significant difference you'd see is that Iaido is practiced as a stand-alone art, while Iaijutsu would be one component of a Ryu (school/style) that has a larger scope. It's unlikely you'd find someone who practices Iaijutsu who doesn't also know Kenjutsu, but you could quite likely find someone who practices Iaido who doesn't know Kendo or ...


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Swords come in different shapes and sizes. Bokken, to represent them as facsimile, should follow. This is sufficient explanation for variation in curvature, thickness, edging, grooves, or any other variables. In addition, different styles demand different weights, shapes and styles for their bokken due to personal or organizational preferences that are ...



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