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21

Everything that's physically challenging carries the chance of injury. Deal with it. Running risks joint degeneration. Bicycling can be bad for sexual function and mobility. Hikers get lost and freeze to death. Tennis causes elbow pain. Soccer players blow out their knees. Baseball players risk concussions from wayward pitches to the head. Lifting weights ...


13

The first, and biggest, point is that if it hurts don't do it. Be careful with an injured shoulder, possibly focusing more on the opposite side or starting on your injured side significantly more slowly or at a lower height (get the dive roll perfect from the knees first). The other major thing is to make sure you are practicing on good mats. There's no ...


12

St John Ambulance has a page containing advice on treating nosebleeds. Specific points relating to stopping a nosebleed quickly are: Advise them not to speak, swallow, cough, spit or sniff because this may disturb blood clots that may have formed in the nose. Ask the casualty to breathe through their mouth (this will also have a calming effect) and ...


8

Icing reduces swelling. That is the only reason to ice as far as I know. Swelling can inhibit the motion of joints and make the injury more painful. It may also take a long time to reduce back to normal levels. Icing is effective up to about 48 hours after the injury occurred. Basically, if it keeps swelling, then icing it will continue to help stop that ...


7

Don't. Stop practicing and let it heal. What you should do is rehab work. Stretches, slow (VERY SLOW) movements exercising the range of motion of various muscle groups. [Edit - I know a girl who injured something in her hip, I don't know what, and she won't let it heal. She reinjures herself constantly.]


6

When I was first instructed on rolling (apart from what has already been mentioned), I was told to imagine being wrapped around a beachball. This can help in keeping the back curved which makes for a smooth roll. This is especially for those whose instinct is to flatten out mid roll and knock the hips into the ground towards the end.


6

Speaking as an aikidoka, Mr. Clements' answer is good. I want to add my emphasis to a few points. First, look at your belt or your toes. This will prevent the most serious injuries (head and neck injuries). Tucking your head is the most important thing to remember. Second, breathe. Breathing is the second most important. I'm not aware that you'll do ...


6

Dit da jow is a classic. There are a variety of recipes, each supposedly for a different purpose. The stuff we use at the school seems pretty good for reducing bruising, and is a mild pain-reliever on par with Arnica Montana (neither is as good as Tylenol, IMO). I've seen it available from an acupuncturist I tried once, but I didn't get any from her.


6

The main thing to understand is that your are in charge of how you train. So if you would like to train light contact, or no contact at all, you should be able to. If your club does not respect that, they are not worthy: Martial Arts nowadays is not as it used to be in terms of need. We need it less for warfare and more for self-defence. As different people ...


6

Visit a couple of dojos that interest you and ask about their injury record. Look for older students; once you cross 50, injuries count more and heal slower. Moreover you're more likely to have other injuries that complicate your practice. Ask about training with injuries, and "opt-out". I can no longer do kneeling work, and when I visit a new dojo I ...


6

There's a few things here that I want to address: I did start thinking about owning a gun and getting a license to carry a concealed weapon after that I feel for you; no one should have to go through what you went through. Let me say this first off: I am 100% for responsible firearms ownership. That said, many people become victims of crimes and ...


5

After getting my nose broken I had perpetual nose bleeds for about a month, I usually had about one each day that would just spring up randomly. My brother was training to be a paramedic at the time, so he knew how to deal with it and taught me. Presumably as it was from his paramedic training, it's well researched. 1: Look down, not up. You don't want the ...


5

As an EMT I would have you sit down and lean forward where your elbows were supported on your knees. With a clean rag or paper towel try to compress your nostrils, or pinch them closed if not to painful. This will prevent blood form going back into your throat and allow it to pool in the nostrils and form a clot. Depending how bad it is it should stop ...


5

After surgery, there is a period of time you have to let your body heal. Your physician will schedule several follow-up visits to check on the progress of the healing. During that time, let your body heal. Martial arts can wait. After that period of healing your physician will clear you for all normal activity. This means everything from general ...


5

Since you're basically asking for anecdotes, here's a third hand account of a technique used by a purported 80+ year old Korean war veteran who still runs marathons. Ice bath. Yup, after your exercise, you take a bath full of cold icy water. OK, so it's not from martial arts exactly, but it seems sufficiently anecdotal. I think you'll find lots of cultures ...


5

At a good gym, meaning experienced coaches and decent equipment, boxing/kick-boxing should not be that dangerous. First of all, you're probably not sparring right away, and once you are its in a controlled environment with mouthpieces, headgear, gloves, and shinpads(if kickboxing). As pointed out in a previous answer, you are probably at an increased risk ...


5

First of all, always be cautious when taking medical advice from the Internet. It's best to consult a doctor or physiotherapist before taking any actions. Any training where you train one particular muscle group may cause a muscle imbalance. That is why a good instructor will let you train various muscle groups. I'm no Taekwondo expert, but I don't think ...


4

I have a shoulder brace recommendation, but before I give it, I will explain why I don't think it's going to do what you want it to as far as the muscles are concerned. Your stated injury is in the SITS muscles which are what comprise the rotator cuff. Only one of the muscles actually produces motion of the limb in a plane, the primary function of these ...


4

I'm not sure that your statement about the safety of boxing is generally accepted. "There is absolutely no way you can make boxing safe," said Nelson Richards, MD, a delegate from the American Academy of Neurology who proposed the original resolution to ban the sport in 1983. The BBC reported According to brain surgeons, over 80 per cent of ...


4

Most places I've trained have seen bruises and soreness as a badge of honour. Perhaps modern sports medicine would suggest ice, pain killers, and anti-inflamatories, but as I understand it, your question is about traditional techniques. Conditioning has often been a component where I've trained. Beat on the makiwara until your hands are too tough to hurt. ...


4

Absolutely you can. I've had exactly the same thing (I believe I caused it by doing too much leg-pressing in the gym). After the surgery it took about 6 weeks to fully recover - by this I mean I had no more tweaks and niggles from it. I recommenced training considerably sooner than that though. Just don't do anything that stresses the abs, or specifically ...


4

You should practice slide-stepping -- with the ball of the foot, arching the toes up. Slowly, slowly, slowly -- quicker -- quicker -- quicker -- full speed. Until the step becomes so natural that you will not hit your toe in the mat anymore. And now, practice losing your balance and recovering it with that step.


4

Talk to your doctor/physical therapist for the details on what you should avoid, but in general: Avoid arts that involve kicks, especially high kicks. Avoid arts that emphasize deep stances. Avoid tournament arts. Kicking and deeper stances are, in general, significantly harder on the knees and the surrounding tissue. Not that you can't work up to it ...


4

The best thing i can say is to strengthen you shin and calf muscles a lot. This can help prevent future injuries. Start doing calf raises and if you have some sort or wrist or ankle weight (or a dumbell if you can balance it) that you can put on your foot and bend your foot up and down to work your shin muscles. I do not know the extent of your injury so ...


4

Let me preface by saying that without seeing your movement, it's hard to say what you're doing wrong. So, assuming that you're doing the movements with a close approximation of "the right way", it probably boils down to flexibility. I would just work on Ginga and maybe Esquiva for a while, throwing in some dynamic stretching kicks (try to kick your ...


4

Taekwondo instructors generally don't have the kind of knowledge you're talking about with regards to identifying muscle imbalance and improving it. For that, you need a personal trainer, someone who's knowledgeable in muscle building and proper exercise form. Taekwondo itself can develop some muscle imbalance, but in general this should be a pretty minor ...


3

Keep your hands up! :) It's easy to get a nose bleed, especially if you've had a few of them. There are many ideas — I haven't tested any of them myself, but I've heard some of them debunked. The most common one, is to tilt your head backwards — this won't stop the bleeding though, but you may keep it from soiling your clothes for a while. Be careful about ...


3

The things that help for me, or maybe I only thought they did, were: stretching and warming up thoroughly in the morning going for walks drinking plenty of water eating lots of quality food In other words, the things we should be doing normally.


3

I occasionally get what I think is a costochondritis flare up, so I can sympathize. First: If you have any doubt on getting it checked out, even if you think it isn't that big of a deal, it is probably a good idea to do so. There are a host of things that a bunch of people on an internet forum won't be able to tell just by your description, and you ...


3

Let it heal. Stop doing things that hurt. Stop getting into situations where it will probably get re-injured. No, really. Remember that we generally feel better about halfway through the healing process. Our body is lying. Listen to your doctors and stay away from practice for the full period recommended. Strengthen and rehabilitate the affected areas. ...



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