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22

Everything that's physically challenging carries the chance of injury. Deal with it. Running risks joint degeneration. Bicycling can be bad for sexual function and mobility. Hikers get lost and freeze to death. Tennis causes elbow pain. Soccer players blow out their knees. Baseball players risk concussions from wayward pitches to the head. Lifting weights ...


17

NO!!!!! Get out. Get out now. As in, do not train there even one more time. There is always the chance of being injured in any martial art. That's true of any active sport, of course--but "combat sports" have an intention of everyone getting hit, kicked, etc. The requirement for safety is therefore paramount. You need to train safely if you are going to be ...


13

The first, and biggest, point is that if it hurts don't do it. Be careful with an injured shoulder, possibly focusing more on the opposite side or starting on your injured side significantly more slowly or at a lower height (get the dive roll perfect from the knees first). The other major thing is to make sure you are practicing on good mats. There's no ...


12

St John Ambulance has a page containing advice on treating nosebleeds. Specific points relating to stopping a nosebleed quickly are: Advise them not to speak, swallow, cough, spit or sniff because this may disturb blood clots that may have formed in the nose. Ask the casualty to breathe through their mouth (this will also have a calming effect) and ...


10

Don't. Stop practicing and let it heal. What you should do is rehab work. Stretches, slow (VERY SLOW) movements exercising the range of motion of various muscle groups. [Edit - I know a girl who injured something in her hip, I don't know what, and she won't let it heal. She reinjures herself constantly.]


9

Icing reduces swelling. That is the only reason to ice as far as I know. Swelling can inhibit the motion of joints and make the injury more painful. It may also take a long time to reduce back to normal levels. Icing is effective up to about 48 hours after the injury occurred. Basically, if it keeps swelling, then icing it will continue to help stop that ...


7

Virtually all of the martial arts use the hands in some way. Even Taekwondo, which uses mostly kicks during sparring, will use the hands to block and punch. Whereas, grappling arts use the hands to grab onto the gi or wrists or whatever. It's not uncommon in Brazilian Jiujitsu or Judo to sprain your pinky and ring fingers due to the fact that your grip ...


7

You're answering your own question here. In sparring they can't go light and hit with momentum and throw dangerous moves. I have seen another guy get an elbow to on the back of his neck and haven't seen him in weeks I got a very strong hook that gave me a huge black eye (after asking for them to go lighter). Last week during a seminar in ...


6

Speaking as an aikidoka, Mr. Clements' answer is good. I want to add my emphasis to a few points. First, look at your belt or your toes. This will prevent the most serious injuries (head and neck injuries). Tucking your head is the most important thing to remember. Second, breathe. Breathing is the second most important. I'm not aware that you'll do ...


6

Dit da jow is a classic. There are a variety of recipes, each supposedly for a different purpose. The stuff we use at the school seems pretty good for reducing bruising, and is a mild pain-reliever on par with Arnica Montana (neither is as good as Tylenol, IMO). I've seen it available from an acupuncturist I tried once, but I didn't get any from her.


6

Since you're basically asking for anecdotes, here's a third hand account of a technique used by a purported 80+ year old Korean war veteran who still runs marathons. Ice bath. Yup, after your exercise, you take a bath full of cold icy water. OK, so it's not from martial arts exactly, but it seems sufficiently anecdotal. I think you'll find lots of cultures ...


6

When I was first instructed on rolling (apart from what has already been mentioned), I was told to imagine being wrapped around a beachball. This can help in keeping the back curved which makes for a smooth roll. This is especially for those whose instinct is to flatten out mid roll and knock the hips into the ground towards the end.


6

The main thing to understand is that your are in charge of how you train. So if you would like to train light contact, or no contact at all, you should be able to. If your club does not respect that, they are not worthy: Martial Arts nowadays is not as it used to be in terms of need. We need it less for warfare and more for self-defence. As different people ...


6

Visit a couple of dojos that interest you and ask about their injury record. Look for older students; once you cross 50, injuries count more and heal slower. Moreover you're more likely to have other injuries that complicate your practice. Ask about training with injuries, and "opt-out". I can no longer do kneeling work, and when I visit a new dojo I ...


6

There's a few things here that I want to address: I did start thinking about owning a gun and getting a license to carry a concealed weapon after that I feel for you; no one should have to go through what you went through. Let me say this first off: I am 100% for responsible firearms ownership. That said, many people become victims of crimes and ...


6

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. ...


5

After surgery, there is a period of time you have to let your body heal. Your physician will schedule several follow-up visits to check on the progress of the healing. During that time, let your body heal. Martial arts can wait. After that period of healing your physician will clear you for all normal activity. This means everything from general ...


5

As an EMT I would have you sit down and lean forward where your elbows were supported on your knees. With a clean rag or paper towel try to compress your nostrils, or pinch them closed if not to painful. This will prevent blood form going back into your throat and allow it to pool in the nostrils and form a clot. Depending how bad it is it should stop ...


5

After getting my nose broken I had perpetual nose bleeds for about a month, I usually had about one each day that would just spring up randomly. My brother was training to be a paramedic at the time, so he knew how to deal with it and taught me. Presumably as it was from his paramedic training, it's well researched. 1: Look down, not up. You don't want the ...


5

I'm not sure that your statement about the safety of boxing is generally accepted. "There is absolutely no way you can make boxing safe," said Nelson Richards, MD, a delegate from the American Academy of Neurology who proposed the original resolution to ban the sport in 1983. The BBC reported According to brain surgeons, over 80 per cent of ...


5

At a good gym, meaning experienced coaches and decent equipment, boxing/kick-boxing should not be that dangerous. First of all, you're probably not sparring right away, and once you are its in a controlled environment with mouthpieces, headgear, gloves, and shinpads(if kickboxing). As pointed out in a previous answer, you are probably at an increased risk ...


5

First of all, always be cautious when taking medical advice from the Internet. It's best to consult a doctor or physiotherapist before taking any actions. Any training where you train one particular muscle group may cause a muscle imbalance. That is why a good instructor will let you train various muscle groups. I'm no Taekwondo expert, but I don't think ...


5

First, context. Unless you live in a place where a lot of random fistfights/assaults happen, you're mostly only going to be targeted for a mugging - which is primarily someone wanting to get your belongings - not someone trying to waste time beating or hurting you out the blue. Second, if they are trying to hurt you, while your "hands are your ...


5

Drills are meant to teach your muscles to perform a technique properly. I would pad the hell out of the recipient before I let another student hit him/her full-force. It's not about inflicting damage, it's about learning how to do something properly and with force. That's how I do it anyway. There's no sense in punching the hell out of each other each time. ...


4

You should practice slide-stepping -- with the ball of the foot, arching the toes up. Slowly, slowly, slowly -- quicker -- quicker -- quicker -- full speed. Until the step becomes so natural that you will not hit your toe in the mat anymore. And now, practice losing your balance and recovering it with that step.


4

I used to wrestle and I get nose bleeds very easily. In wrestling, you only have a couple minutes to stop a nosebleed before you forfeit the match. As weird as it sounds, we would use a small tampon. Just stick it up there and tilt your head forward. It'll be stopped very quickly.


4

Absolutely you can. I've had exactly the same thing (I believe I caused it by doing too much leg-pressing in the gym). After the surgery it took about 6 weeks to fully recover - by this I mean I had no more tweaks and niggles from it. I recommenced training considerably sooner than that though. Just don't do anything that stresses the abs, or specifically ...


4

Let it heal. Stop doing things that hurt. Stop getting into situations where it will probably get re-injured. No, really. Remember that we generally feel better about halfway through the healing process. Our body is lying. Listen to your doctors and stay away from practice for the full period recommended. Strengthen and rehabilitate the affected areas. ...


4

For me icing is the most effective. On the first two days, I iced bruised area for ten minutes. It keeps my bruised area from going black. And I go jogging once a week. I feel that lots of minor injuries go away after running, since it helps blood flows.


4

The things that help for me, or maybe I only thought they did, were: stretching and warming up thoroughly in the morning going for walks drinking plenty of water eating lots of quality food In other words, the things we should be doing normally.



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