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14

This is not the best answer, though it is an answer. "Internal" and "External" can be traced through Sun Lu Tang's writings on the "Neijia". Being of the Chinese literati, he used the words 內 (internal) vs. 外 (external) because it has double meanings. Besides the connotations of "esoteric" and "exoteric", those words were widely used to describe "domestic" ...


9

9 to 12 months. Just a guideline. I say this time frame because, simply from experience, thats about how long - after regular and quality training - before a student starts to see some of their training take hold as instinct. But the question itself is fairly unsophisticated, and isnt answerable in a way that'd be relevant to any given individual. Its ...


7

An external martial art is one in which the emphasis is on physical application of force (whether your own or the opponents force redirected) to cause damage to your opponent. This is the case whether you are relaxed (re-directed force or joint locks etc.) or applying force directly via the application of brute strength. An internal martial art is one in ...


6

The Neijia mailing list, which was the vehicle created by Mike Sigman in the late 1990s to promote serious development of the internal martial arts, defined the internal martial arts to be those that respected the six harmonies (Sigman 2012a, 2012b). The list followed the classical definition of the six harmonies due to (Dai Longbang 1750), a master of ...


5

There is no one, unifying piece that is at work in the video provided, but many pieces working in parallel. I will be as explicit in naming as many as possible to give an accurate view of the principles at work. Balance – Okamoto-sensei (I have it as Okamoto Seigo, though have seen Okamoto Shogo as well, especially from Russian videos) sits upright in ...


5

It depends on many factors. Tim Cartmell comes from one point of view (am referring answer given by Dave Liepmann), and from that point of view he is absolutely correct. I can imagine a Tai Chi teacher who'd teach you to fight with Tai Chi and you'd get proficient, certainly. There are many variables to take into account. I am here making the assumption ...


4

(this is not intended to be a full answer - I just want line breaks) The other answers are good ones, and all bring up valid points. I think they're all a bit long though. I like stslavik's answer (it's very technical and detailed, which is nice), but I think he missed a couple points: The first is that Okamoto-sensei isn't letting his uke settle into ...


4

External and internal martial arts are the same thing, but they start from a different place. All martial arts follow different paths up the same mountain, but the end result is the same. Because a teacher can't take you all the way up the mountain does not mean the style is incomplete. The limited point of view is this: An external martial art will teach ...


3

Try reading Doug Wile's 3 tai chi books "Tai chi touchstones", "Lost tai chi classics from the late ch'ing dynasty" and "Tai Chi Ancestors", all available from Amazon. Wile traces the first use of "internal" to (From the Lost Classics book) Huang Tsung-hsi's (1610-95) "Wang Cheng-nang mu-chih ming" (Epitaph for Wang Cheng-nan) and his son Pai-chia's ...


2

A few months to a year To achieve mastery in taiji it takes a lifetime, like in any art, martial or otherwise. But to achieve fighting proficiency should take less than a year. Similar to any other hard-sparring martial art, it should only take a few months to a year to attain a basic level of skill in internal martial arts such as tai chi. This is what ...


2

There are two things going on there that need to be separated out. One is the technique that Okamoto-sensei is performing, the other is the technique that the uke is performing. It is important to observe both, since both are part of what is fundamentally occurring here. On a purely physical level, what he is doing is: Pushing them back while they hold ...


2

It all depends on several aspects. Are you practicing a martial aspect of the taijiquan Does your teacher/school teach the martial aspect of the taijiquan How much do you practice and what is the main focus of your practice Who you practice with What else do you do to advance your skill This is necessarily not a full list, but the main things should be ...


2

I retract my answer - I have now viewed the technique, and I don't see ryoto mochi sukui nage (as done in tomiki's koryu dai san no kata section A) anywhere in that technique. I had to look up the Japanese, but ryoto mochi sukui nage is "two handed scooping technique"; my answer is limited to that throw. At around the 9:21 mark of the video referenced in ...


2

If you study at a school that does both "free fighting" (san shou) and "push hands" (tui shou), and you practice the form 60-90 minutes a day, and you go to class two to three times per week, it should take approximately 5 years to be able to fight at a medium level for self defense. At the school where I study they say that if you want to develop the ...


1

In reply to the answer "A few months to a year" My name is Johan Duquet and I am the teacher/trainer of the Shen Yi School in Valencia. I teach Chen style Taiji Quan as taught to me by Fu NengBin and some Gao Bagua and XingYi as I learned from Luo DeXiu. I (among other things) try to teach/test the skills from these arts within the format of Sanda as seen ...


1

Ben Lo, senior student of Yang Chengfu and senior classmate of Professor Zheng Manqing, prefers the cop-out: Ben said that if you are working correctly, combative skill will evolve naturally. It's just like walking - if you set out in the correct direction, and keep walking, then no matter when, even if you didn't want to reach the destination that lies ...



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