Tag Info

New answers tagged

-3

There are no internal and external martial arts. Martial arts are of two kinds; Combat type ans Competive type. Combat type martial arts focuses mainly on real life situations, well-being, self-defense, etc. (Varma Kalai, Butthan, Bando, Kalaripayattu, Wing Chun, etc.) Competive type martial arts focuses mainly on tournaments, mat fights. (Taekwondo, Judo, ...


-1

When he says qi, he means qi. Lately, I am quite confused by the number of people who assume past masters have written great and useful texts about martial arts but simultaneously been so foolish as to be unable to tell the difference between using cosmic energy to move and produce force and using their muscles. It seems to me that, in order to be ...


4

Qi is basically a catch-all term used in Chinese martial arts and medicine to refer to unseen "energy" that surrounds and permeates everything in nature, including human beings, plants, animals, rocks, etc. Is Qi real? Yes, no, maybe. The answer depends on how Qi is defined. Some define it to be an amalgam of different things we can directly or indirectly ...


-2

Internal martial arts use lots of chi to generate internal power (neijin). This force is not related to body mechanics, leverage, or muscular strength. At an advanced level, it can be exploded from any part of the body. Qigong is used to generate this power. Internal arts are known for producing extremely healthy practitioners. External martial arts use ...


-6

In the chinese scientific paradigm, qi is the energy that permeates and composes everything. It is difficult for we westerners to discuss this because there is no corresponding concept in the western scientific paradigm. It's important to note that this doesn't mean qi doesn't exist. Jin is a vibration force whose substance is qi. A simple analogy from my ...



Top 50 recent answers are included