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9

Sounds like a quote from Kisshomaru Ueshiba in "The Spirit of Aikido" (合氣道のこころ). I don't have the English version to compare, but in the Japanese version it's the first line of the first chapter: 合氣道は、いうまでもなく本質的に武道である。 Kisshomaru expressed the same sentiment many times - his father may have as well, but I don't recall off hand. Morihei more often talked ...


7

I've studied iaido for five years, and practiced a variety of styles under one teacher (that's how much my words are worth). In general, parries, blocks and deflections are done with the side or the back of the sword. It provides a very convenient yin/yang balance to the movements, where you can draw from your opponent's strike and smoothly deflect it, then ...


6

Disclaimer: I am a judo ikkyu who prefers osotogari but doesn't have an osotoguruma to speak of. I will be using the opinions of more knowledgable judoka to inform this answer. Judo throws are named and grouped by their telltale action. That is, the names are a pedagogical tool to delineate the various body mechanics one can use to throw an opponent. That's ...


6

I haven't been able to find a reference to that direct quote. There are a number of things that mean the same thing. O'Sensei appears to have spoken often about being on a quest to find the perfect Budo, and that Aikido (or Aiki Budo) is the result of that search. The closest quote I've found is: "On reflection, Aikido can be seen as the root source of ...


6

The names will depend on your style. For example, oshi taoshi is called both ikkyo and ikajo but refers to the same technique. You should try to get hold of your syllabus in romaji (the Roman alphabet transcript) as this will telly you the minimum you have to learn. The rest is just flavour. The aiki web and the Aikido FAQ both have a glossary of common ...


5

Have fun with this list: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/dji/home/aikilex/ This is a tool for people who want to gain greater insight into the vocabulary of the art of aikido. Its purpose is not to offer authoritative definitions of the many terms we use in the dojo, but rather simply to list, in Japanese and romanized script, the words and word fragments ...


3

Japanese martial arts traditionally do not block. The theory is Evade and Strike. An easy way to consider this is to look at the footwork. In Aikido, your hanmi is not a strong stance to block, but it's a great stance for moving and evading. With this mindset, I have trouble believing that there is a proper "Block". I can't think of any time I've been ...


3

You've answered your own question. It's etiquette. Right-hand means you don't expect to use your sword. Left-hand means you're ready for action. The Samurai had loads of rules and etiquette to abide by. This code of conduct is called Bushido (the way of the warrior). It's a lot like the Western concept of Chivalry. In modern terms, it would be like carrying ...


2

If the image below describes the technique accurately, I would say it is because uke's legs form a wheel (or a circle) in the air. However, I have no official source for this.


2

It's similar to the concept of shaking hands with your right hand. The majority of people are right handed, so when shaking hands you present this hand and clasp to show you do not have weapons. With a sword, a right-handed person draws faster for combat with the sword on the left side of the body. All of this assumes people are right handed. If someone is ...


2

Upon seeing that all the newbies in the class were right-handed, my Kendo sensei told us the following: "I'm sorry everyone but, in Kendo, everyone is left-handed." We really thought it was weird, seeing as the way we had to hold the shinai felt really natural, with the right hand near the tsuba and the left hand at the opposite end of the tsuka. We soon ...


1

Miyamoto Mushashi used two swords, one in each hand. I am not sure whether this qualifies as left handed in the sense of your question, but it definitely uses a sword in the left hand.


1

From my point of view, o-soto-gari is throwing uke toward his back. You bend Uke's so his weight is on a leg, and you reap that leg. in osotoguruma, your leg act as a pivot, and you rotate him over it. You'll see it done in competition very differently than in practice : you take Uke, and pulls him toward you, and you rotate at the same time. While he ...


1

There is also a small reference work called "Aikido Terminology: An essential reference tool in both English and Japanese." The book has very thorough explanation of the language -- with things grouped usefully, (e.g. "stances", "etiquette", etc). It very clearly explains the words in English and Japanese including pronunciation.



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