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13

Most people acknowledge that, given that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is derived from Maeda's teachings in Kodokan Judo (then known as Kodokan Jiu-Jitsu in the appropriate romanization of the time), it is recognized as a derivative of Judo, but they have each long-since taken very different paths. Jujutsu (the modernly accepted romanization of 柔術) is a broad term ...


12

Genuine Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu all stems from one man: Mitsuyo Maeda of Kodokan Judo. Maeda had numerous students the world over, and upon settling in Brazil, was featured in a circus there, where he was seen by Carlos Gracie, the eldest son of Gastao Gracie, a business partner of the circus there. Carlos was accepted as a student, passed on his training to his ...


11

They are the same thing. It's only a matter of romanization (spelling japanese words using roman letters). As a reference point, here is how it is pronounced in japanese (found on wikipedia). As to how it is written, it all comes down to how the names were romanized. The most popular systems used today are probably the Hepburn system, the Nihon-Shiki ...


8

I've had the same problem for my whole judo and jiu jitsu career! Squats and lunges. When your coming in for your o-goshi (hip throw) or seoi nage (shoulder throws) be sure to be stepping in low, not waiting until your turned in to get low. This makes the motion a lot easier. The other thing is try to keep it all one fluid motion. I found when I was ...


8

there are a few things you can do to help with this: break down your opponents posture, it's very hard, if they are sitting tall, even for someone with normal/long legs to keep the guard closed. use your legs to draw them in, and lock up their upper body, this keeps them closer, and makes it easier to keep your guard closed. develop a good open guard ...


7

If you are referring to 柔術, then we can look at the two kanji. The first kanji is found in 柔道 -- judo. The second kanji is found in 剣術 -- Kenjutsu. Thus, I would opt for jujutsu as being the logical romanji form of 柔術. The other "spelling" maybe viewed as either incorrect or illogical based on this. Thus, I would translate 柔術 as the soft art which ...


6

for rolling breakfalls with new students i have 2 different methods for making them less intimidating. start from a "high kneeling" position, IE: one knee down, and one knee up. then teach the roll from their. It tends to keep their posture more inline and stops them from freaking out about the floor being so far away. the other technique i use, which ...


6

Break falls (especially those that require a student to turn over himself, as in kote gaeshi) are usually quite intimidating to new students... Most instructors take the approach of propping up mats for students to learn on, making it a nice, soft place to land. My background (I was a performing magician, specializing in applied psychology, hypnosis, and ...


5

Practice your squats, keeping your back straight and head up. Repeat until you die :) I think your instructor is reminding you to 'bend your knees' and not 'bend your back' when lift or need to get low. A common call at many dojo's I'm sure! If you're tall (I'm 6 foot and skinny) you will find it difficult to "lift" an opponent with, let's say "a low ...


5

Check this video and other from the same author: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5U2E0kA8_8 The method comes from Germany and France. It's pretty useful for overcoming fear at first. (resulting falls are too soft for actual use with a shihan tori, but still a good start) EDIT: you may notice that the ukes in the video actually strike the tatami in the ...


4

Aikido, judo and karate are all complementary arts: One (karate) focus on strikes, the others on avoidance, control of the opponent, and using body physiognomy to control/throw. Judo works from grapples and Aikido from a distance. As such, they are all good additions to each other. Whatever art you chose to do, remember to "empty your cup" before ...


4

For forward break falls, we start from kneeling (both knees on the floor), then squating, then to standing. The kneeling is for minimal impact and meant for making sure technique is correct. I wouldn't imagine any are intimidated by this.


3

I believe these are spelling variations - wikipedia lists both of these as acceptable transliteration of the Japanese word. Of course I'm not fluent in Japanese, so I would defer to someone who is.


3

All the above are good and I agree. They seem to emphasize teaching absolute beginners. Once they are able to fall, a couple of hints that I think are important to (re) emphasize. 1) Breathe. Don't hold your breath. For my own training, I purse my lips and "hiss" the breath out in order to ensure that I don't hold my breath. Every couple of years I ...


3

Aikido is not simply about locking and throwing, it also has striking (atemi waza). Aikido complements a lot of other arts; once you have practiced some of the Aikido techniques you will find it very beneficial to your karate blocks (uke), and you will find some of the same Aikido concepts buried within your karate bunkai.


3

The best 'drill/exercise' I've used for getting low is to make sure I'm the balls of my feet with my knees bent. Whenever my heel touches I find it impossible to bend my knees enough. I spent a few years doing all of my hip-throw repetitions with duct-tape over covering my heels. This gave me an extra little reminder every time my heels touched. After a few ...


2

I have a friend who is very near to taking his black belt in Karate and he started Aikido with me just under a year ago. So far he has found it to complement his Karate very well and often demonstrates how techniques can work together in his Karate lessons. In learning Aikido he has found it easier than me as he already has a base in some of the concepts ...


2

There are physical limitations, you have to figure out if the person you are trying to contain can actually fit in your guard. If they can but you are struggling then a good tip I've learned is to reduce the space between their belly button and your groin, raise your hips and curl your feet to their butt and this works to give you more control of their ...


2

In Germany those two refer to different things but that is a special case: Jiu-Jitsu in Germany is usually used for the traditional japanese system and related styles while Ju-Jutsu is used for a system developed in the 1960s for German police forces. So in Germany those two are different but that does only hold for Germany because everywhere else the German ...


2

No art is the ultimate art. Any martial artist should strive to be well rounded. A good striking art, good ground skills, good conditioning, being able to control your technique and having a true martial arts dojo and great instructor so the martial art phylosophy part is not left out is what I recommend. Any part of the equation left out leaves a hole in ...


2

When teaching the backward break-fall you can start from laying down position. Teach the students the rolling and getting up bit, and then move on to the falling down bit once they now how to handle them selves on the ground. Gives them a bit of security before they dive into it from a standing position.


2

There's Morganti Jiu Jitsu that is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu style. It's usually not what is thought of when people say Brazilian Jiu Jitsu though, as Brazilian is a stand in for Gracie because Rorion sued his family members for using the name in the US.


1

These Japanese "masters" sound like losers. When you're too old to compete, you can still spar and give back to the art by coaching. When you're too old to spar, you can still hang around the gym to give pointers and be friendly. You can still train to be fit and in condition. The idea that you'll reach your pinnacle of fitness and then need to quit is ...


1

I trained in a variant of Hapkido. Some of the specifics may be different between our two styles, but this seems very similar. We learned falls this way: Crash Mat with pauses between as many steps as possible. Crash mat doing the whole technique, but doing it as slowly as possible. Crash mat putting everything together. Regular mats with pauses (maybe 1 ...


1

@Patricia makes a good point. It's all about being low. By that I mean don't step in and then try to get low, because that doesn't work. I'm 6'2" and I can vouch for that. Even back when I was young and fast, trying to get low after getting inside my opponents guard was time consuming. What worked for me was any attack where being low was a natural part of ...


1

Patricia has some good answers for closed guard. I have issues with a triangle choke and cannot do it due to flexibility and the size of my legs. So in my BJJ class the guys who cannot do the triangle choke practice another way. When in position where you would throw your leg across horizontally instead walk your legs down there back as far as they can go ...


1

Aikido is not a good addition to anything. Aikido is a complete budo and a specialized (thus, uncomplete) martial art. That's to say Aikido does give you all means for your psychophysical development as a budoka (m.a. practitioner). At the same time, Aikido technique is very focused and thus: there is no direct linkage between dojo technique and ...


1

depends what you are looking for. Martial arts tend to be quite a personal choice. I'd say go try both ( and make sure you do try both, and not start up with the first one you try ) Another choice which can be quite enjoyable for ex-karate is Kali / Escrima / Arnis. but basically, it's whatever you enjoy doing the most, so try different arts!


1

If you practiced Shotokan karate, or one of the very rigid forms, then Aikido provides a balance, with fluid moves and a focus on movement rather than the solid anchor that Shotokan uses, and it trains you in flexibility and the awareness of body, rather than the focused strength and power that karate often aims for. For those reasons I think it is an ...



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