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4

According to Wikipedia, it was introduced to the UK by Edward William Barton-Wright in 1898.


4

A calf slicer is a compression lock that crushes the calf muscle, and I've heard the terms "calf crush", "calf slicer", and "calf crank" all used interchangeably. At 2:00 of this video, Eddie Bravo describes the Vaporizer as a "toe hold slash calf crank, slash devastation...this one is very hard to resist." (Emphasis mine.) So there's an element of calf ...


4

As a submission it's mainly a groin / hamstring stretch - effectively forcing your opponent into a "splits" type position. It's been a go-to move of mine from under half-guard for a while, be aware that those with good flexibility won't tap so be prepared to switch to the sweep.


3

From my dim understanding, BJJ's electric chair can include a straight kneebar or twisting leglock element, but the primary aim is to sweep, or to submit with a hamstring or groin stretch.


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In a calf crank the movement is in line with the foot-ankle-shin structure, while in the vaporizer it's not: this creates torque on the hip/knee/ankle joints, which is a movement pattern not found in a calf crank. This twisting motion is found instead in many other submissions such as the toe hold, heel hook, kimura and omoplata. You might think of the ...


3

I can't comment as a new user, but this technique is IBJJF legal for everyone except kids under 12. The banana split is usually reached fom the Truck, but there is a lot in common between it and the Electric chair submission. If you watch the last match between Eddie and Royler, Eddie gives a textbook exhibition of the Electric Chair.


2

It doesn't sound like it's an issue with this school, but some schools require that students only wear certain colors, such as white. If you want a gi other than white and you plan on occasionally training at other schools, especially while traveling, it's a good idea to have a white gi to wear so you don't cause any problems at the host school.


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Traditional Japanese style is referred to as "classical jujitsu". It's also known as "Samurai ryu" (Samurai schools). And note that the spelling tends to be "jujitsu", not "jiujitsu". The latter spelling is mostly now used to refer to Brazilian Jiujitsu. But it still can be used for classical jujitsu, depending on the country where it's used. Just not as ...



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