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14

I'm 15 and would like to start martial arts when I turn 16. I want a year to get myself in to really good shape before I start. This is a terrible plan. Find a gym and start training judo now. Find a proven strength program and start following it at the same time. Putting things off a year, most of the time, just means you're choosing not to do it. In ...


6

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


6

According to this dentist, the recommendation by the American Association of Orthodontists is that anyone with braces should wear a mouth guard whenever doing a sport, including boxing, wrestling, and martial arts: http://www.gechofforthodontics.com/mouthguards I would assume this recommendation is for "all the time" during practice, not just for sparring. ...


5

That's barely a modification of kesagatame. There's no gi, so he uses a slightly different grip. It totally counts. Just about all techniques, including pins, are modified in actual application. This is so true that the examples of throws that don't look obviously modified are shared as highlights and widely touted as beautiful paragons of the art. But a ...


5

If you are not a trained first aider, then I strongly suggest you did a course as soon as possible. As David Liepmann said, the recovery position is generally safe. However, if you are not a trained first aider, you might miss either something or do the wrong thing or exacerbate things that will lead to the victim dying. I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one ...


4

In Aikido, the practice of ukemi, beyond the obvious fitness' reasons, has 2 reasons: allow the tori to perform techniques without restraint. Technically, the technique is as good as it unbalances uke. A good uke allows tori/shite to focus a bit more on the technique rather than the safety of his partner. The second reason is less obvious and more ...


4

In the text, he explains the origin of this term. And he points out that it's his word, not something the Japanese would say: When I commenced to teach jujitsu in Yokohama, Japan, in every trick I showed how to use the lower abdomen, and how to maneuver opponent's balance. My first pupils were Japanese friends, and lower abdomen to them was shita ...


4

What is the difference between Judo, karate and martial arts? "Martial arts" is a name for practices that aim at perfecting fighting skills. Some people include things like boxing and judo, while others would say they are "martial sports" as their practice focuses almost exclusively on techniques allowed by their competition rules, clearly ignoring ...


4

It is, and it takes a LONG time to reach. If you ever reach your 9th Dan, you get a red belt to wear. The white-red belt is gotten at the 6th Dan. But at this stage, you need to wait between 8 or 10 years between each test. And it's not automatically given to you ... the internal federation will only give the highest Dan to people who actually have an ...


4

Limbo Haven't gotten really deep into ukemi, but it seems like if you made it a game like limbo, that would be pretty fun for kids. Hold a broom-stick pretty high at first, have them forward roll underneath it. Then lower it as they progress. Then start with it low and have them roll over it. Raise the bar as they progress. This could probably be done ...


4

Is 16 to[o] late of an age to start hapkido or judo? It's a good age to start training... young enough to pick up flexibility, condition, strength, fitness etc. fairly easily, recover quickly between training sessions, but old enough not to be too frail or struggle to understand the subtleties of body mechanics, tactics, etc.. What were you guys ...


3

In terms of sizing you're probably best off just contacting the company you want to buy from with your measurements. They'll most likely be able to help you get the right size. In terms of which one to buy, I would take a read of this article. It even comes with a bonus picture of Kyra Gracie almost wearing a Gi that you boys are bound to like. A summary ...


3

That's the difference between learning and absorbing... You know how sometimes some martial arts sensais teach very weird and specific situations? What do you do if someone grabs your left wrist from behind? You were never expected to use that technique in that exact situation. It's about UNDERSTANDING the technique and to a lesser extend, muscle memory. ...


3

At my taijutsu dojo, the instructors teach basic ukemi to kids as young as seven. The way they approach it is to start by showing it in action with an advanced technique -- like, they'll do a rear sweep on a guy, then point out how that would have hurt if he didn't fall on his back properly, then teach the rear hard fall. So, just like teaching anything: ...


3

Suggest you review Patrick Parker's blog (I've linked to a post that is specific to teaching children; it references exercises & games to teach kids). Specifically he mentions How to get kids to slap when they fall and Children's falling exercises, but there is a lot there, and Parker-Shihan is probably the best aikido blogger out there.


3

A number of techniques have the explicit purpose of crashing the attacker's head into the ground. Done well, that is the only path available for attacker. This is not the kind of technique that I would ever want to receive twice without some kind of safety built-in. A number of things get done to make sure you can practice: Receiver lets go early so the ...


3

Yes, ukemi is a baseline necessity for practicing techniques, and obviously necessary to practice throwing techniques, but there are many applications past this: Aikido ukemi practice is a crucial aspect in developing the 'soft/supple body' necessary for high-level practice/utilization. Not just how to fall safely, but how to conserve and efficiently ...


3

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...


2

If you attempt to go too low your opponent will step back, increasing the space between you two, and then simply pull you backwards sitting you down on your butt. You will feel quite dumb when this happens.


2

To add to the (excellent) answers already provided: Black is an arbitrary color for an arbitrary level. This is why I've told people to be very, very dubious of special "black belt tracks." There are two reasons for this: First, "1 dan" (or its equivalent) is an arbitrary designation within the art. It indicates that you have learned whatever set of ...


2

Yes it is. It actually goes Black -> Red White -> Red Those Upper ranks tend to be more about service to the art.


2

Great question and likely one which needs to be asked again and again. One short answer might be: Judoka may execute throws in tactical (street) situations against assailants with clothing. A longer answer might be: clothing is a tool in the hands of a martial artist; as my students have practiced with judogi, street clothes and various levels of attire. The ...


2

Honestly, you should just get out there and start. The best way to get into the shape you need to be in to be good at a martial art is to practice that martial art. It doesn't matter if you are a 200 lbs overweight person or a 30 lbs underweight skinny-fat person(me when I started), don't worry about being in shape to start, just start and the changes will ...


2

Start now. Most places will let you take a class or two free if you are a newcomer. That being said don't limit yourself to just Judo or Hapkido. Give your local Brazilian Jujitsu,Karate,TKD,and Aikido schools a try. Work on finding the right "fit" for you and it will be a much more enjoyable experience. PS Good luck and yes if you do find a good school ...


2

I've had one very minor chip from being seoinage'd (by a girl half my size). Some guys wear mouthguards, especially in newaza (ground fighting), and it's not a bad idea.


2

I have seen two judoka w/ mouth guards over the past 10yrs. I have had a heel to the mouth (split lip, now a scar). But no issues w/ the teeth. As stated above, use for newaza could be a good option (back of head meets chin).


2

I clacked my teeth together during a takedown and ended up with a tiny chip of one of my front teeth. Now I never get on the mats without a mouthguard. If you have trouble breathing with a normal mouthguard, ask your dentist for the kind of guard meant to prevent damage if you grind your teeth when you sleep. It's a little thinner and harder, and won't be ...


1

Chuck Norris started martial arts at 19. Aside from the hype, he was actually a world champion. He did Judo and Jiu Jitsu too.


1

Like any sport, wear the correct protective gear especially a mouth guard, train with a qualified instructor and exercise a bit of common sense between yourself and your training partner. If you are experiencing any discomfort,pain or are not confident in the situation, stop immediately. I train with several guys that are in the same boat and have had no ...


1

We are what we do repeatedly. Judoka practice with the gi. Many throws can be done without it, but most judoka haven't ever practiced without the gi. Without it, many of their techniques will be slower and harder to execute. They will need to think more, and find alternatives. Because they don't train without the gi, their performance will necessarily be ...



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