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8

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


8

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


6

On Modern jujitsu by Tomiki, Kenji there is a nice diagram (see below) that explains the evolution of old style jujitsu, striking arts, and weapon arts into modern budo practices. In this paper, we have a quote from Kano-sensei from 1926 about past and future judo: I think that there must be a method of randori and shiai that includes the atemi-waza, ...


6

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


5

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


5

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


5

This is actually a very valid question. Consider that the NFL (U.S. football) is now going through a kind of falling out period whereby the athletes are becoming more and more aware of the growing risk of chronic brain injury over time. In the UFC, we're starting to see some questions regarding brain injury rates as well. And for a long time, we've known ...


5

Disclaimer: I am a judo ikkyu who prefers osotogari but doesn't have an osotoguruma to speak of. I will be using the opinions of more knowledgable judoka to inform this answer. Judo throws are named and grouped by their telltale action. That is, the names are a pedagogical tool to delineate the various body mechanics one can use to throw an opponent. That's ...


5

If you are not a trained first aider, then I strongly suggest you did a course as soon as possible. As David Liepmann said, the recovery position is generally safe. However, if you are not a trained first aider, you might miss either something or do the wrong thing or exacerbate things that will lead to the victim dying. I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one ...


4

The gokyo is organized around a number of pedagogical factors, including the difficulty of ukemi, the difficulty of the throw, the relevance of the throw, and so on. In my experience, few clubs teach according to the gokyo, and there are no clear answers on why a given throw is in its particular place. Mifune even had his own gokyo, with many throws moved to ...


4

In the text, he explains the origin of this term. And he points out that it's his word, not something the Japanese would say: When I commenced to teach jujitsu in Yokohama, Japan, in every trick I showed how to use the lower abdomen, and how to maneuver opponent's balance. My first pupils were Japanese friends, and lower abdomen to them was shita ...


4

I used to play water polo in high school, and some of the lifeguarding maneuvers (such as taking the person under the water with you) can lessen these things. The other thing that worked well for me (especially once I established a reputation for it) is if they are willing to choke you, then they should be willing to suffer the consequences. I would grab ...


4

In Aikido, the practice of ukemi, beyond the obvious fitness' reasons, has 2 reasons: allow the tori to perform techniques without restraint. Technically, the technique is as good as it unbalances uke. A good uke allows tori/shite to focus a bit more on the technique rather than the safety of his partner. The second reason is less obvious and more ...


4

It is, and it takes a LONG time to reach. If you ever reach your 9th Dan, you get a red belt to wear. The white-red belt is gotten at the 6th Dan. But at this stage, you need to wait between 8 or 10 years between each test. And it's not automatically given to you ... the internal federation will only give the highest Dan to people who actually have an ...


4

What is the difference between Judo, karate and martial arts? "Martial arts" is a name for practices that aim at perfecting fighting skills. Some people include things like boxing and judo, while others would say they are "martial sports" as their practice focuses almost exclusively on techniques allowed by their competition rules, clearly ignoring ...


4

Limbo Haven't gotten really deep into ukemi, but it seems like if you made it a game like limbo, that would be pretty fun for kids. Hold a broom-stick pretty high at first, have them forward roll underneath it. Then lower it as they progress. Then start with it low and have them roll over it. Raise the bar as they progress. This could probably be done ...


3

if you ever forget to hold your chin on your chest when you fall, you'll smash your head on the ground after a fall, and you'll know why you learn ukemi. It HURTS. I've seen an olympians judoka (who have beeing intensively trained for most of his live) got to tears after failing an ukemi and hitting his head ... and when it happened, he stopped training ...


3

A number of techniques have the explicit purpose of crashing the attacker's head into the ground. Done well, that is the only path available for attacker. This is not the kind of technique that I would ever want to receive twice without some kind of safety built-in. A number of things get done to make sure you can practice: Receiver lets go early so the ...


3

Yes, ukemi is a baseline necessity for practicing techniques, and obviously necessary to practice throwing techniques, but there are many applications past this: Aikido ukemi practice is a crucial aspect in developing the 'soft/supple body' necessary for high-level practice/utilization. Not just how to fall safely, but how to conserve and efficiently ...


3

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...


3

Anecdotally, Judo can be absolutely brutal on your body: After years of dedication to judo it gave me a black belt (first dan) and unparalleled skills at taking anyone down. It also gave me: 1) Osteoartheritis on all my fingers from GI gripping 2) Pinched nerve in my neck 3) Bad lower back from not wanting to fall on my back and lose by ...


3

This article summarizes it quite nicely with statistics for all injuries in Judo: http://judoinfo.com/research11.htm According to that research, there is a 7 in 1000 chance for boys and a 3 in 1000 chance for girls, based on historical statistics, of having a serious injury to the nose. Caveat being that this is for young Judo competitors 17 years old or ...


3

I trained Judo in my high school's Judo club. Our high school was physically joined right next to a middle school. And so the middle schoolers would attend our Judo class also. While I was 5 foot 10 inches tall and about 140 pounds, the middle schoolers were probably barely even 5 feet tall and about 90-100 pounds. Huge difference. Our instructor paired us ...


3

If you do an ass-to-ankles air squat, you'll be unable to execute a number of hip throws (koshiguruma, ukigoshi, ogoshi...) on any but the shortest opponents. Tsurikomigoshi might still work but it's hard. In addition to being out of position for grips, most athletes struggle to apply significant force from the absolute bottom position of a really, really ...


3

When I first started training, I was expected to learn about the history of Karate and answer questions regarding the colours and symbols of our uniforms. One such question was: "Why is our gi white?" I believe that what I was taught goes well with what a previous poster stated: "The white uniform represented the values of purity, avoidance of ego, and ...


3

Suggest you review Patrick Parker's blog (I've linked to a post that is specific to teaching children; it references exercises & games to teach kids). Specifically he mentions How to get kids to slap when they fall and Children's falling exercises, but there is a lot there, and Parker-Shihan is probably the best aikido blogger out there.


3

At my taijutsu dojo, the instructors teach basic ukemi to kids as young as seven. The way they approach it is to start by showing it in action with an advanced technique -- like, they'll do a rear sweep on a guy, then point out how that would have hurt if he didn't fall on his back properly, then teach the rear hard fall. So, just like teaching anything: ...


3

That's the difference between learning and absorbing... You know how sometimes some martial arts sensais teach very weird and specific situations? What do you do if someone grabs your left wrist from behind? You were never expected to use that technique in that exact situation. It's about UNDERSTANDING the technique and to a lesser extend, muscle memory. ...


2

If the image below describes the technique accurately, I would say it is because uke's legs form a wheel (or a circle) in the air. However, I have no official source for this.


2

Question is a bit old, but this is my input as a fighter who never did any ground work in competition. I Never liked it and never used it. I've always fight standing, and if my oponent went on the ground, I didn't even bother going on him for 10-15 seconds, I just stand up. Things you need to learn though if you fight like this : A- get up FAST. If ...



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