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12

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


10

Nearly all forms of aikido are predicated on avoiding any possibility of pressure-testing their skills against resisting opponents in free-sparring or competitive environments. Nearly all practitioners stick to demonstration and practice with cooperative partners. From this it naturally follows that few aikidoka will be caught on camera trying to apply their ...


9

I assume you are working on the arm bar known in judo as juji gatame. The principle in this technique is the use of a class 2 lever to hyperextend the opponent's elbow joint. Resistance is in the middle, at the opponent's elbow joint. Force is applied by pulling down at the wrist and raising the hips. The fulcrum should be one of your legs; this makes any ...


9

If there's a lack of progress during ground work in a judo match, the referee will stand the competitors up. This is intended to encourage action, rapid attack, and prevent stalemate positions.


8

From my own experience, a match between judo/aikido starts at a distance doing Aikido and as soon as the distance closes, switching to judo. I have no link to videos as I never bothered filming any. However, this is what Tomiki found when he started to introduce Judo randori style play into Aikido: his students (who all knew some Judo) would automatically ...


7

I prevent testicle crushage while armbarring my partners and opponents by: Pulling the arm further towards my head, so their elbow is across my pelvis and not my crotch Squeezing my knees tighter on their upper arm Wearing underwear (or lack thereof) that provides freedom of movement, so that they can move out of the way of an elbow mid-attack Not giving a ...


6

First things first, I think you should see a doctor that could give you a "go". A specialist could tell you if he thinks it would be safe for your knee if you restarted doing martial arts. If the doctor says no, you're putting yourself at risk if you restart. Let's face it, even if you feel your health is deteriorating, it is much better than with a ...


6

While it is essential that you get enough protein (and calories by the way) in your daily diet if you want to build muscle, it turns out that the timing of it is not important at all. Studies show that consuming protein right before, after, or during a weight-training workout doesn't gain you anything. This is despite what you've heard from weightlifters and ...


6

The Kodokan still recognizes 67 official throwing techniques, but not all of them are allowed in competition, and some of them have been banned in competition for some time. The whole classification of throws is a messy business. The differentiating points are sometimes rather arcane: why does it matter if tori is holding the belt or not in performing a ...


6

I've learned both methods in judo, BJJ, and karate. Tucking the bottom leg makes for smoother rolls and stand-ups after the fall, but makes little sense if one cannot roll and is just trying to best take the impact. It is also suboptimal for rolling if one's opponent is still latched on. Keeping the bottom leg mostly straight is good for stopping the ...


6

If you are 75 kg, then you should not have a problem throwing an opponent who is 102 kg with a basic hip throw. The major hip throw (ogoshi) is the first hip throw in the judo curriculum. It's simplest to start with throwing ogoshi slowly because ogoshi has the nice property that you can stop mid-throw. It's easiest to understand the mechanics while ...


5

Yes, playing judo introduces the risk of brain injury. Judo is a contact sport. Competitive judo is a very contact sport. If you play rough and don't take ukemi properly, you risk concussion. The risk is not as great as in boxing or striking arts. The risk is manageable for nearly all trainees, especially people who don't compete at the elite levels or who ...


5

I've been training Bjj since 1998. I always learned to squeeze my knees to prevent this pain on testicles. This is the most common way to avoid this kind of injury. But this year, when I was visiting the academy of the Master Sylvio Behring, he taught me a different approach for the arm lock (arm bar). Squeeze your knees early. He told me to close my knees ...


4

Yes, the above technique would be a pin in competition judo. A pin in competition judo does not need to be a standard pin; it needs to meet the definition of a pin under the referee rules. This is good especially because judo people can get very nitpicky about what exactly constitutes a particular pin [more on that later]. If your opponent taps at any time ...


4

On the physical side: Knee ligament replacement surgeries are pretty good these days. You should see a doctor to see if that is an option. (You might want it anyway, even if you don't train hard, because you want to make sure you're not suffering meniscus wear as well...). The second person you want to see is a sports medicine specialist. They can let ...


4

I have a very traditional view on this issue: it's best to take your falls with good ukemi, even in shiai. By all means, try to prevent being thrown, or turn to your stomach and fall with good front ukemi. But using poor falling technique in competition to avoid scores by your opponent is a path to injury, not long-term success. Competitors are better off ...


4

Based on this NYTimes article: The frequency of judo deaths in Japan gives 108 deaths since 1983. I will not paraphrase the article but other nationality report no deaths in the last decade or so. I am going to assume that those deaths were directly resulting from judo and not just happened while judo was going on. Thus your risk of dying are increased if ...


4

My first tip for you is about how you can protect your joints. Well, first try to relax your arm. If you have relaxed arms this will make it much harder for your opponent to break your grip. The grip is much more than the strength of your fingers and to break the grip your opponent must stretch your arm to the end. This technique will avoid it because you ...


4

According to forensic science it is pressure applied to the carotids and not the veins that causes loss of consciousness, although pressure on the veins leaves specific signs of strangulation when they bust, but are not a cause of death or unconsciousness. (pg. 297, 14.2 Strangulation, see section #2 re: carotid compression). Although the deeper carotid ...


4

I am going to assume we are talking about the cross body arm lock (juji gatame, in judo). It is possible to escape before an opponent sets in a joint lock tightly. This basically involves maneuvering your elbow out of your opponent's legs. It's easiest to do this if you can still move your body around effectively. It is not possible if you wait too long. ...


4

There was a machine at a gym I used to go that was inadvertently an armbar exerciser. It started you out on your side, with your body in a "crunch" position, and you moved to straighten out your back, just using your core muscles, resisting against a weight that wanted to keep you crunched up. Basically, this is the armbar movement, where you are crunched in ...


3

I would like to build on Dave's answer. Let's assume you are sufficiently experienced to have a throw that is currently your favorite. Here is how I suggest organizing competition training (as opposed to training for general development or teaching). As your opponents get more experienced, you should develop your judo around continuous attack with your ...


3

The shortest answer is: yes. For a somewhat longer answer, a perfect example of judo working without a gi is current UFC Women's Bantamweight champion Ronda Rousey, who uses judo throws all the time to transition into ground and pound or submissions (usually an arm bar). Ronda Rousey Highlights - for a visual example


3

I also train in TKD and though we don't train for grappling (locks, chokes, etc.) very often, we are told that against a stronger opponent, you may need to do something else to weaken their grip. (As Sardathrion explains in his answer). The weapon of choice is a kick or strike to the groin! You may find that there is a small but vital aspect of the lock ...


3

After a judo class I'm more concerned with getting carbohydrate for glycogen depletion than I am with protein for muscle growth. A mix of both after class is fine. However, it's good to be skeptical of supplements and protein powders. They are above all a heavily-marketed consumer product for which advertising is trying to convince you that you need. Most ...


3

What I've picked up over the years about how blood chokes actually work - and I could be wrong - is this: There's a nerve in the neck called the Vagus nerve. One of its many functions is to sense blood pressure of the arteries in the neck. When you compress those arteries, it will cause blood pressure to increase rapidly. The Vagus nerve senses it and ...


3

Whatever you do in Aikido, the simple rule of thumb applies: never play fair! If your and your opponent's hands are similarly strong and you're performing your lock single-handed, than you have a very slight chance to prevail. In order to achieve the goal of your lock you have to: use both hands against the one of the opponent use your legs and body ...


3

For a judo perspective on falling technique (ukemi), the best place to start is the formal throwing techniques (nage-no-kata), where the most emphasis is placed on falling details. For forward rolling falls (zempo kaiten), there are two basic possibilities: You cannot roll and stand up, as in the nage-no-kata fall for tsurikomi goshi. You may be ...


3

Its never to late to start martial arts as a hobby. If you should have higher hopes to do that on a professional level, it depends a lot on which martial arts you want to do. There are several cases in mixed martial arts where people became professionals, even though they started relatively late, even some of them with no prior martial arts expierence. ...



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