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17

I'm 15 and would like to start martial arts when I turn 16. I want a year to get myself in to really good shape before I start. This is a terrible plan. Find a gym and start training judo now. Find a proven strength program and start following it at the same time. Putting things off a year, most of the time, just means you're choosing not to do it. In ...


6

According to this dentist, the recommendation by the American Association of Orthodontists is that anyone with braces should wear a mouth guard whenever doing a sport, including boxing, wrestling, and martial arts: http://www.gechofforthodontics.com/mouthguards I would assume this recommendation is for "all the time" during practice, not just for sparring. ...


6

While it is essential that you get enough protein (and calories by the way) in your daily diet if you want to build muscle, it turns out that the timing of it is not important at all. Studies show that consuming protein right before, after, or during a weight-training workout doesn't gain you anything. This is despite what you've heard from weightlifters and ...


5

The Kodokan still recognizes 67 official throwing techniques, but not all of them are allowed in competition, and some of them have been banned in competition for some time. The whole classification of throws is a messy business. The differentiating points are sometimes rather arcane: why does it matter if tori is holding the belt or not in performing a ...


5

I clacked my teeth together during a takedown and ended up with a tiny chip of one of my front teeth. Now I never get on the mats without a mouthguard. If you have trouble breathing with a normal mouthguard, ask your dentist for the kind of guard meant to prevent damage if you grind your teeth when you sleep. It's a little thinner and harder, and won't be ...


5

That's barely a modification of kesagatame. There's no gi, so he uses a slightly different grip. It totally counts. Just about all techniques, including pins, are modified in actual application. This is so true that the examples of throws that don't look obviously modified are shared as highlights and widely touted as beautiful paragons of the art. But a ...


4

I've had one very minor chip from being seoinage'd (by a girl half my size). Some guys wear mouthguards, especially in newaza (ground fighting), and it's not a bad idea.


4

In terms of sizing you're probably best off just contacting the company you want to buy from with your measurements. They'll most likely be able to help you get the right size. In terms of which one to buy, I would take a read of this article. It even comes with a bonus picture of Kyra Gracie almost wearing a Gi that you boys are bound to like. A summary ...


4

Is 16 to[o] late of an age to start hapkido or judo? It's a good age to start training... young enough to pick up flexibility, condition, strength, fitness etc. fairly easily, recover quickly between training sessions, but old enough not to be too frail or struggle to understand the subtleties of body mechanics, tactics, etc.. What were you guys ...


4

We are what we do repeatedly. Judoka practice with the gi. Many throws can be done without it, but most judoka haven't ever practiced without the gi. Without it, many of their techniques will be slower and harder to execute. They will need to think more, and find alternatives. Because they don't train without the gi, their performance will necessarily be ...


4

That's the difference between learning and absorbing... You know how sometimes some martial arts sensais teach very weird and specific situations? What do you do if someone grabs your left wrist from behind? You were never expected to use that technique in that exact situation. It's about UNDERSTANDING the technique and to a lesser extend, muscle memory. ...


4

My first tip for you is about how you can protect your joints. Well, first try to relax your arm. If you have relaxed arms this will make it much harder for your opponent to break your grip. The grip is much more than the strength of your fingers and to break the grip your opponent must stretch your arm to the end. This technique will avoid it because you ...


4

Yes, playing judo introduces the risk of brain injury. Judo is a contact sport. Competitive judo is a very contact sport. If you play rough and don't take ukemi properly, you risk concussion. The risk is not as great as in boxing or striking arts. The risk is manageable for nearly all trainees, especially people who don't compete at the elite levels or who ...


4

If there's no local schools, your best bet is either finding someone local who has done any decent amount of judo, or, finding a school or instructor in a related grappling art. Any form of wrestling will give some related tools. Part of this is that grappling is about manuevering other people's bodies and manuevering your own around what they're doing - ...


4

I have a very traditional view on this issue: it's best to take your falls with good ukemi, even in shiai. By all means, try to prevent being thrown, or turn to your stomach and fall with good front ukemi. But using poor falling technique in competition to avoid scores by your opponent is a path to injury, not long-term success. Competitors are better off ...


3

The shortest answer is: yes. For a somewhat longer answer, a perfect example of judo working without a gi is current UFC Women's Bantamweight champion Ronda Rousey, who uses judo throws all the time to transition into ground and pound or submissions (usually an arm bar). Ronda Rousey Highlights - for a visual example


3

After a judo class I'm more concerned with getting carbohydrate for glycogen depletion than I am with protein for muscle growth. A mix of both after class is fine. However, it's good to be skeptical of supplements and protein powders. They are above all a heavily-marketed consumer product for which advertising is trying to convince you that you need. Most ...


3

I have seen two judoka w/ mouth guards over the past 10yrs. I have had a heel to the mouth (split lip, now a scar). But no issues w/ the teeth. As stated above, use for newaza could be a good option (back of head meets chin).


3

Based on this NYTimes article: The frequency of judo deaths in Japan gives 108 deaths since 1983. I will not paraphrase the article but other nationality report no deaths in the last decade or so. I am going to assume that those deaths were directly resulting from judo and not just happened while judo was going on. Thus your risk of dying are increased if ...


3

Great question and likely one which needs to be asked again and again. One short answer might be: Judoka may execute throws in tactical (street) situations against assailants with clothing. A longer answer might be: clothing is a tool in the hands of a martial artist; as my students have practiced with judogi, street clothes and various levels of attire. The ...


3

Honestly, you should just get out there and start. The best way to get into the shape you need to be in to be good at a martial art is to practice that martial art. It doesn't matter if you are a 200 lbs overweight person or a 30 lbs underweight skinny-fat person(me when I started), don't worry about being in shape to start, just start and the changes will ...


3

Start now. Most places will let you take a class or two free if you are a newcomer. That being said don't limit yourself to just Judo or Hapkido. Give your local Brazilian Jujitsu,Karate,TKD,and Aikido schools a try. Work on finding the right "fit" for you and it will be a much more enjoyable experience. PS Good luck and yes if you do find a good school ...


2

Chuck Norris started martial arts at 19. Aside from the hype, he was actually a world champion. He did Judo and Jiu Jitsu too.


2

I would like to build on Dave's answer. Let's assume you are sufficiently experienced to have a throw that is currently your favorite. Here is how I suggest organizing competition training (as opposed to training for general development or teaching). As your opponents get more experienced, you should develop your judo around continuous attack with your ...


1

When we practiced Judo in our Martial Arts we have a mixture of sessions with Gis on and with normal street wear. This allowed us to learn the basic techniques in a dojo situation and in a practical setting. Mostly any technique you learn will end up having a practical application outside the dojo and helps me reinforce what the move I have just learnt.


1

The All Japan Judo Federation basic instructor course is 2 days of lectures followed by essay questions (at least when I took it last year). There is an extensive section on head injuries, as almost all the deaths mentioned above were as a ressult of head trauma. Primarily multiple blows to the back of the head by unsupervised children, but also, rarely by ...


1

Yes, but in the same way you can learn to play violin by yourself, or learn a language by yourself. If you do not have a teacher who can comment on (aka critique your progress and give specific advice) it will be a challenge.


1

Differences between a Judo and a BJJ Gi have already been explained by Tussles. About the size, here is the most important thing: get a Gi that fits you well. Check the manufacturer's website for a size chart, ask them if you're unsure or between sizes, since you have a very muscular build see if they offer the wider versions of their sizes (eg. A1W). ...


1

Like any sport, wear the correct protective gear especially a mouth guard, train with a qualified instructor and exercise a bit of common sense between yourself and your training partner. If you are experiencing any discomfort,pain or are not confident in the situation, stop immediately. I train with several guys that are in the same boat and have had no ...


1

In Hiroshima and northern Japan where Maeda was from there are native Ryu of ground fighting and wrestling. The confusion is that everyone finds it shocking that there are these waza apart from BJJ. Some BJJ people think it is new. in Judo the sport had ability to take a knee and initiate newaza to avoid an opponents throw until the 60s. Perhaps for a draw ...



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