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14

What makes a 10th dan? While judo 10th dans are all supremely skilled at judo, the difference between a 10th dan and a 6th dan is not technique nor judo skill, but rather contribution to the art. Consider these excerpts from a list of profiles of judan-ranked judoka: He was unbelievably energetic and eventually stood at the head of the Kodokan's ...


7

From the origin of belts and gis themselves: Kano apparently began the custom of having his yudansha wear black obi (belts) in 1886. These obi weren't the belts karateka and judoka wear today -- Kano hadn't invented the judogi (Judo uniform) yet, and his students were still practicing in kimono. They were the wide obi still worn with formal kimono. In ...


7

A third degree brown belt is the lowest level of brown belt, not the highest, and is thus the furthest from black belt. A black belt does also not denote an understanding of all the tenets of judo. A third-degree brown belt means that you're not a total novice to the art. Sometimes it means even less. Teddy Roosevelt was a tough guy who liked many combat ...


6

My experiences in judo and BJJ The judo club I trained at regularly for several years was about 50/50 between newaza and tachiwaza (groundwork and throws). (Actually, it was more like 43/47/10 with the 10% being kata and standing joint locks.) My time at other judo schools has showed the ratio to be fairly different: 75/25 in favor of throwing, or even ...


6

On Modern jujitsu by Tomiki, Kenji there is a nice diagram (see below) that explains the evolution of old style jujitsu, striking arts, and weapon arts into modern budo practices. In this paper, we have a quote from Kano-sensei from 1926 about past and future judo: I think that there must be a method of randori and shiai that includes the atemi-waza, ...


5

To clarify on the use of bleach, as long as it is non-chlorine based (like borax or OxiClean) you should be fine to use it. Chlorine bleach will yellow your non 100% cotton clothes but color safe or oxygen based bleaches should be fine. Personally, I use baking soda (somewhere between 1/4 and 1/2 a cup depending upon your washer/load size/etc.) to keep my ...


5

Yes, doing proper breakfalls in judo competition means you increase the likelihood that your opponent will score and achieve higher scores for a given throw. Non-ukemi ukemi Noted judo coach Gerald Lafon has made a lot of noise about how this presents the competitive judoka with contradictory goals: Certainly, the most costly exercise in Judo in terms ...


5

The arms do the work of unbalancing in most, if not all throws. That includes ashiwaza such as okuriashibarai, osotogari, and quite obviously sasaetsurikomiashi. These throws would be unworkable without breaking the balance through the arms. That doesn't make them arm/hand throws, because the telltale element of leg throws is that the leg is the pivot or ...


5

You've taken the first step in doing so - acknowledging that you're doing it. Now, where do you go from there? That largely depends on the situation, but here's a few things that might help to get you started. Learn to roll. You've been put in an arm bar, or you've been thrown, or basically any other situation that if it follows through to its natural ...


5

I studied judo and many other martial arts. I've never studied wrestling. Personally, I feel like it's perhaps less helpful to a new student to try to explain things in terms they understand already. It's usually best to approach it like they have absolutely no knowledge and start from there, just like you do with every student. Otherwise you assume they ...


5

Disclaimer: I am a judo ikkyu who prefers osotogari but doesn't have an osotoguruma to speak of. I will be using the opinions of more knowledgable judoka to inform this answer. Judo throws are named and grouped by their telltale action. That is, the names are a pedagogical tool to delineate the various body mechanics one can use to throw an opponent. That's ...


5

This is actually a very valid question. Consider that the NFL (U.S. football) is now going through a kind of falling out period whereby the athletes are becoming more and more aware of the growing risk of chronic brain injury over time. In the UFC, we're starting to see some questions regarding brain injury rates as well. And for a long time, we've known ...


5

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


5

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


5

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


4

Aside from the strength training for grips, there's also certain technique involved in grips. For example, when you hold the right arm sleeve of your opponent, make sure you grab the part right under his elbow, and grab it tight, so he is unable to move his arm properly. At the same time it's hard for him to release his harm since you can control his arm ...


4

It is not possible for one athelete to perform in two different weight categories in the same tournement, for the simple reason that weight categories don't overlap and there no longer is an "open" category. A current list of weight categories is listed on wikipedia, and the same information is mentioned in a document on the IJF website. To quote the 2013 ...


4

I would like to provide the correct answer and ask you to discard the chosen answer completely. It's already a bit late to do that, but maybe it's not too late. Reason for the correction: In Judo, you DO NOT, in any way, need the muscle to CARRY your opponent, because you simply NEVER carry your opponent in Judo in any way. This excludes being mounted on ...


4

Since both Judo and BJJ are combat sports, their competition rules will heavily dictate what is and what isn't trained. Judo discourages training grappling on the ground in their rules by both limiting the time the athletes have on the ground as well as awarding Ippons which effectively end the match before anything can happen on the ground. Thus most Judo ...


4

Keep HaraiGoshi as your main attack, but try to develop a couple of other throws, to be less predictable. Develop your Kumikata to be able to launch if from different grip. Feint with HaraiGoshi to setup a new move. One I liked myself was start with Harai Goshi, from a very close position, bend your leg and hook his exterior leg when he blocks, and use the ...


4

Throws in Judo are typically classified/named in the original Japanese by the fulcrum or pivot center, not the point(s) of force origin. Sometimes the name of the move also involves a metaphorical description of any significant body motions imparted on the uke to help illustrate the overall look or feel of the move from the stand point of the person who is ...


4

The gokyo is organized around a number of pedagogical factors, including the difficulty of ukemi, the difficulty of the throw, the relevance of the throw, and so on. In my experience, few clubs teach according to the gokyo, and there are no clear answers on why a given throw is in its particular place. Mifune even had his own gokyo, with many throws moved to ...


4

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


3

In Aikido, the referees will award an ippon based on a good technique from tori's part, however much noise uke makes. If, uke falls over and the technique is rubbish, then all that is awarded is a wazari. There are three judges so even if one cannot see what happens, the other two should be able to. Of course, judges are human and can err but a compliant ...


3

The general goal of not turning belly-down in judo competition is not enough. You need to develop specific, actionable goals to work on in newaza randori (and even, perhaps, with proper etiquette, to set up in tachiwaza randori) and to try out in shiai. Judo groundwork, in my view, is composed of several broad strokes: Rapidly applied chokes, which ...


3

The traditional way to sit for men is indeed with 2 fists in between. Women can choose to close their legs but should definitely not be forced to. The placing of the hands is with your hands facing each other, placed on the end of your Judogi. You put your elbows outward. When you bow you simply place your hands in front of you the same way they are placed ...


3

Nothing wrong with either your BJJ or judo schools. As you move up the ranks in BJJ you'll be exposed to more throws and the same goes for newaza in Judo. But like you said, BJJ is focused on the ground and Judo is focused on standing. You'll mainly train for the primary aspect of each sport, especially as a lower belt. I've also seen a BJJ school never ...


3

I can’t comment, so I'll answer it here instead. As @Dave Liepmann said, it depends on your strengh and your ability. Utsuri Goshi is hard to do. The hardest move I've done, seriously. Using the “right” move is always a decision based on your opponent's reaction. If you start and manage to raise him off his feet (which is the first step of both moves) as ...


3

We are taught to practise in bjj to use a gi (uniform) you can hang it on something strong and practise pulling up if you do not have a gi to use for this excercise you can use a belt a martial art belt if possible. It helps to work your arms and you will be able to hold on with that grip when the opponent is resisting or moving.


3

I trained Judo in my high school's Judo club. Our high school was physically joined right next to a middle school. And so the middle schoolers would attend our Judo class also. While I was 5 foot 10 inches tall and about 140 pounds, the middle schoolers were probably barely even 5 feet tall and about 90-100 pounds. Huge difference. Our instructor paired us ...



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