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4

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


2

Break falls are a good way for the students to learn to practice cooperatively and safely. They let the person executing the offensive technique push through it in a way that should work against an untrained opponent unfamiliar with using the fall as an escape, so it's a useful basic fighting skill for both people. Break falls are also a form of ...


4

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


4

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


3

Anecdotally, Judo can be absolutely brutal on your body: After years of dedication to judo it gave me a black belt (first dan) and unparalleled skills at taking anyone down. It also gave me: 1) Osteoartheritis on all my fingers from GI gripping 2) Pinched nerve in my neck 3) Bad lower back from not wanting to fall on my back and lose by ...


1

Speaking from past experiences : To avoid injuries when fighting poeple with vast strengh, or height difference there is only 1 rules : Dont force it. Just like when you practice with students : If one smaller guy / kid manage to put you off balance, dont use raw strengh to stay up. you WILL overpower him, and you might hurt him the process. Roll along, ...


1

I think you can answer two-way to your questions. 1st, long term risk to your body depends on how you train. If you have bad habits, and you apply useless strain on your body, it WILL catch up to you (at 40 some morning I feel like I have the knees and the back of a 60's). But its also part my fault. My mom ( who was also my 1st coach) always told me to ...


5

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


5

This is actually a very valid question. Consider that the NFL (U.S. football) is now going through a kind of falling out period whereby the athletes are becoming more and more aware of the growing risk of chronic brain injury over time. In the UFC, we're starting to see some questions regarding brain injury rates as well. And for a long time, we've known ...


0

It isn't simply a matter of getting lower, and it a matter of creating a pivot point, and applying leverage. If your center is too distant from theirs it will become harder to execute a throw. Imagine a seesaw with two points set out from the center instead of a single one. ========= vs ========== ^ ^ ^ The distance from you to the ...


3

I trained Judo in my high school's Judo club. Our high school was physically joined right next to a middle school. And so the middle schoolers would attend our Judo class also. While I was 5 foot 10 inches tall and about 140 pounds, the middle schoolers were probably barely even 5 feet tall and about 90-100 pounds. Huge difference. Our instructor paired us ...


3

This article summarizes it quite nicely with statistics for all injuries in Judo: http://judoinfo.com/research11.htm According to that research, there is a 7 in 1000 chance for boys and a 3 in 1000 chance for girls, based on historical statistics, of having a serious injury to the nose. Caveat being that this is for young Judo competitors 17 years old or ...


2

Kano wanted to make his Judo system something that could be done at full speed and force yet which did not seriously injure anyone. He realized that only this way could people continue to make progress over time, and it was this personal progress - building character along with skill as a result of continuous effort over time - that became Judo's focus. That ...


1

I'm not incredibly tall, but I've dealt with shorter opponents before. Mostly, you're just going to have to rein yourself in for being a bit stronger presumably. Aside from that, you're going to weigh more, so you may want to remind them to use proper technique to avoid a situation where they overstrain a joint or have you fall on top of them. From a center ...


6

On Modern jujitsu by Tomiki, Kenji there is a nice diagram (see below) that explains the evolution of old style jujitsu, striking arts, and weapon arts into modern budo practices. In this paper, we have a quote from Kano-sensei from 1926 about past and future judo: I think that there must be a method of randori and shiai that includes the atemi-waza, ...


2

If you do an ass-to-ankles air squat, you'll be unable to execute a number of hip throws (koshiguruma, ukigoshi, ogoshi...) on any but the shortest opponents. Tsurikomigoshi might still work but it's hard. In addition to being out of position for grips, most athletes struggle to apply significant force from the absolute bottom position of a really, really ...



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