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The shortest answer is: yes. For a somewhat longer answer, a perfect example of judo working without a gi is current UFC Women's Bantamweight champion Ronda Rousey, who uses judo throws all the time to transition into ground and pound or submissions (usually an arm bar). Ronda Rousey Highlights - for a visual example


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The Kodokan still recognizes 67 official throwing techniques, but not all of them are allowed in competition, and some of them have been banned in competition for some time. The whole classification of throws is a messy business. The differentiating points are sometimes rather arcane: why does it matter if tori is holding the belt or not in performing a ...


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The All Japan Judo Federation basic instructor course is 2 days of lectures followed by essay questions (at least when I took it last year). There is an extensive section on head injuries, as almost all the deaths mentioned above were as a ressult of head trauma. Primarily multiple blows to the back of the head by unsupervised children, but also, rarely by ...


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You can try chinese meditation balls. When you use them, allow yourself to notice that the more you relax the more it comes with ease to facilitate them not touching. That is, the proper technique is to move then around in a circle without touching. Going one way, then the other. You can also try pushups on your fingers or any other exercise that a ...


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My first tip for you is about how you can protect your joints. Well, first try to relax your arm. If you have relaxed arms this will make it much harder for your opponent to break your grip. The grip is much more than the strength of your fingers and to break the grip your opponent must stretch your arm to the end. This technique will avoid it because you ...


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I recommend: Joint Supplements + Hand exercises. Chronic overuse is chronic overuse. You cannot just solve it magically in days, these things usually take time and effort. You could try lessening your usage of your individual fingers by kind of pressing your fingers in towards each other so that each finger supports the fingers adjacent to it (e.g. pinky ...


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I would like to build on Dave's answer. Let's assume you are sufficiently experienced to have a throw that is currently your favorite. Here is how I suggest organizing competition training (as opposed to training for general development or teaching). As your opponents get more experienced, you should develop your judo around continuous attack with your ...


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Yes, playing judo introduces the risk of brain injury. Judo is a contact sport. Competitive judo is a very contact sport. If you play rough and don't take ukemi properly, you risk concussion. The risk is not as great as in boxing or striking arts. The risk is manageable for nearly all trainees, especially people who don't compete at the elite levels or who ...


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Based on this NYTimes article: The frequency of judo deaths in Japan gives 108 deaths since 1983. I will not paraphrase the article but other nationality report no deaths in the last decade or so. I am going to assume that those deaths were directly resulting from judo and not just happened while judo was going on. Thus your risk of dying are increased if ...



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