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11

What style of TKD? ITF, WTF, ATA, STF, etc? I would suspect that they are probably WTF, and their bounce has to do with the style of sparring that they train for. TKD sparrers in general use their feet a lot, and there is a lot of switch stance, spins, aerial kicks, things of that nature, so the requirement is to be light on your feet. Watch any WTF or ...


11

Rulesets determine skillsets. Tactics are determined by the "battleground" (read: competition setup). If a style focuses on competition that doesn't allow foot-sweeps or clinching, and kicks are scored higher and more frequently than face punching, your fighters will end up looking like Olympic TKD: hands at the sides to deflect body kicks, facing sideways ...


11

They are the same thing. It's only a matter of romanization (spelling japanese words using roman letters). As a reference point, here is how it is pronounced in japanese (found on wikipedia). As to how it is written, it all comes down to how the names were romanized. The most popular systems used today are probably the Hepburn system, the Nihon-Shiki ...


8

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


7

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


7

If you are referring to 柔術, then we can look at the two kanji. The first kanji is found in 柔道 -- judo. The second kanji is found in 剣術 -- Kenjutsu. Thus, I would opt for jujutsu as being the logical romanji form of 柔術. The other "spelling" maybe viewed as either incorrect or illogical based on this. Thus, I would translate 柔術 as the soft art which ...


7

Things that I have found help me with specifically wrist locks, but some of which are adaptable to other forms of practice as well. Grab a Partner for an Extra Day This is really the best option, but also logistically the most difficult. Talk to the other students in your class and see if one of the more experienced ones would be willing to add an extra ...


5

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


5

The basics are: First there was jui jitsu (or ju jutsu, or a billion other ways of englishizing the Japanese name for it). then Kano took it and made it more gentle and sport like, taking out most of the strikes and such. Then Maeda took judo to Brazil, and it was turned into Brazilian jiu jitsu or bjj. which, in North America, is quickly being simplified ...


4

Jujutsu means soft techniques, aka techniques done without a sword. Those were definitely not soft on people. It is an all encompassing term for Japanese martial arts. As such, your questions is What is a good reference covering the history of martial arts in Japan. Stephen Turnbull is a good source to start of with. Otherwise, you likely are going to ...


4

In the text, he explains the origin of this term. And he points out that it's his word, not something the Japanese would say: When I commenced to teach jujitsu in Yokohama, Japan, in every trick I showed how to use the lower abdomen, and how to maneuver opponent's balance. My first pupils were Japanese friends, and lower abdomen to them was shita ...


3

A number of techniques have the explicit purpose of crashing the attacker's head into the ground. Done well, that is the only path available for attacker. This is not the kind of technique that I would ever want to receive twice without some kind of safety built-in. A number of things get done to make sure you can practice: Receiver lets go early so the ...


3

Yes, ukemi is a baseline necessity for practicing techniques, and obviously necessary to practice throwing techniques, but there are many applications past this: Aikido ukemi practice is a crucial aspect in developing the 'soft/supple body' necessary for high-level practice/utilization. Not just how to fall safely, but how to conserve and efficiently ...


3

In Aikido, the practice of ukemi, beyond the obvious fitness' reasons, has 2 reasons: allow the tori to perform techniques without restraint. Technically, the technique is as good as it unbalances uke. A good uke allows tori/shite to focus a bit more on the technique rather than the safety of his partner. The second reason is less obvious and more ...


3

if you ever forget to hold your chin on your chest when you fall, you'll smash your head on the ground after a fall, and you'll know why you learn ukemi. It HURTS. I've seen an olympians judoka (who have beeing intensively trained for most of his live) got to tears after failing an ukemi and hitting his head ... and when it happened, he stopped training ...


3

I believe these are spelling variations - wikipedia lists both of these as acceptable transliteration of the Japanese word. Of course I'm not fluent in Japanese, so I would defer to someone who is.


3

In most places, black belts do not have special licences to do anything. As such, you wouldn't be able to get his licence revoked. What you can do, however, is file a complain to your local police department. If indeed he tried to strangle you while you had not acted menacingly (some places recognize pre-emptive self defense as valid if the threat was ...


2

Break falls are a good way for the students to learn to practice cooperatively and safely. They let the person executing the offensive technique push through it in a way that should work against an untrained opponent unfamiliar with using the fall as an escape, so it's a useful basic fighting skill for both people. Break falls are also a form of ...


2

In Germany those two refer to different things but that is a special case: Jiu-Jitsu in Germany is usually used for the traditional japanese system and related styles while Ju-Jutsu is used for a system developed in the 1960s for German police forces. So in Germany those two are different but that does only hold for Germany because everywhere else the German ...


2

I wouldn't trust training any standing joint locks (wrist, elbow, shoulder locks) on anything but a live person. It's not "practice makes perfect" but "practice makes permanent". Real feedback is at its most crucial with small joint manipulations like these, where fine motor coordination is so key. The chance of ingraining a wrong pattern is too high. I ...


2

Do you have a friend or significant other that is willing to help you? Even if they're not trained, they can help provide feedback on how the different things feel and you can adjust based on what you know they should be feeling. If you go this route, it would probably be good to teach them breakfalls (if you're doing any kind of takedown or any lock that ...


1

In short, there is no difference between joint locking and throwing which prevents you from practising "in the air." Simply rehearse the movements without a partner, visualising your opponent; your opponent's position and reactions, how they feel when you lock them or throw them and so on. There are some limitations, but the exercise is still beneficial, in ...


1

TKD people usually aim for competitions and tend to train techniques which would score them the most points. Most of this high-score techniques are high kicks. In competitive TDK (WTF) there is very little (if any) room for grappling and things alike. Most of the time it's an exchange of kicks.


1

You can practice doing rear naked chokes on your leg. When you're sitting down bring your knee up. Wrap your arm around your shin as if it were your opponent's throat and squeeze. Do both arms. This will also benefit your guillotine choke and clamping down for solid overhooks. This will make you better at finishing the chokes, but unfortunately there's no ...



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