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8

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


8

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


5

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively ...


4

In Aikido, the practice of ukemi, beyond the obvious fitness' reasons, has 2 reasons: allow the tori to perform techniques without restraint. Technically, the technique is as good as it unbalances uke. A good uke allows tori/shite to focus a bit more on the technique rather than the safety of his partner. The second reason is less obvious and more ...


4

In the text, he explains the origin of this term. And he points out that it's his word, not something the Japanese would say: When I commenced to teach jujitsu in Yokohama, Japan, in every trick I showed how to use the lower abdomen, and how to maneuver opponent's balance. My first pupils were Japanese friends, and lower abdomen to them was shita ...


3

A number of techniques have the explicit purpose of crashing the attacker's head into the ground. Done well, that is the only path available for attacker. This is not the kind of technique that I would ever want to receive twice without some kind of safety built-in. A number of things get done to make sure you can practice: Receiver lets go early so the ...


3

Yes, ukemi is a baseline necessity for practicing techniques, and obviously necessary to practice throwing techniques, but there are many applications past this: Aikido ukemi practice is a crucial aspect in developing the 'soft/supple body' necessary for high-level practice/utilization. Not just how to fall safely, but how to conserve and efficiently ...


3

if you ever forget to hold your chin on your chest when you fall, you'll smash your head on the ground after a fall, and you'll know why you learn ukemi. It HURTS. I've seen an olympians judoka (who have beeing intensively trained for most of his live) got to tears after failing an ukemi and hitting his head ... and when it happened, he stopped training ...


3

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...


2

Break falls are a good way for the students to learn to practice cooperatively and safely. They let the person executing the offensive technique push through it in a way that should work against an untrained opponent unfamiliar with using the fall as an escape, so it's a useful basic fighting skill for both people. Break falls are also a form of ...



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