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8

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't ...


5

At least in boxing, height in and of itself doesn't give you an advantage. What gives the advantage to the taller boxer, assuming roughly equal levels of skill and experience, is greater reach. So the trick for the taller boxer becomes one of staying in the narrow zone where he can hit the other guy without being hit in return. In the specific example of ...


4

The sensei has modified the 'official' katas of the style. She 'mixed' some parts of pinan shodan, with pinan nidan and so. That's pretty worrying. It's not uncommon for schools to have slightly different "interpretations" of the same gross movement (e.g. one to say something's a block while another says it's a strike - but the limbs are moving in ...


3

If you like the Dojo - if the schedule is convenient, teacher is good and people are nice, join the group. It is better to join a Dojo than not. Do not worry too much about the "purity" of the style. As long as whatever is being taught in the Dojo makes sense and as long as you learn and progress, practicing always beats not practicing.


3

Just looking at the negatives... 守破離 (Shuhari) is a common concept in Japanese martial arts: to obey (守/shu) , to digress (破/ha), and to leave (離/ri) any style. It might be that said sensei is in the 破 (or digress) stage of her progression. It might be hubris but that is hard to gauge on your information alone. This could explain her "bad mouthing" other ...


3

It all depends on you honestly, she might have her reasons for asking for advance. Since these days, martial arts training centers are like in every other block (at least where l live). And its quite natural for somebody who have that much experience to mix different styles. My sensei is a 5 dan aikidoka and also have a black belt in arnis, so often time I ...


2

No, well-taught martial arts don't. Injury can. The following suggestion is made sight unseen, and does not constitute medical advice or diagnosis. I say it because you describe a postural change I have observed many times in the past, with a common cause; other/different causes are certainly possible. The posture you describe corresponds to a postural ...


2

You are mixing up karate (the art) and karate-do (the "way", or "the whole", one's journey with karate). Most schools and/or instructors weave spiritual (philosophical) teachings into their syllabus and training, this comprises the "-do" and is distinct from karate as an art. There can be a lot of commonality of the "-do" across styles but that's due to ...


1

Those things are important, but they are secondary to Karate's (and any other martial art's) purpose: learning how to be a good fighter. All these other things are aspects you need to study to be a good fighter. But the goal is and always will be: how to be better at punching and getting punched than the other guy. If you lose focus on the primary goal, you ...



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