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8

I have been in TKD and Martial arts for over 40 years. I have a master rank in TKD. I also have a traumatic brain injury. This happens very seldom but the head gear in any sport does not protect you from concussion as the violent movement of the head causes the injury. I learned a long time ago to move my head away from a punch or kick. This minimizes the ...


7

From the origin of belts and gis themselves: Kano apparently began the custom of having his yudansha wear black obi (belts) in 1886. These obi weren't the belts karateka and judoka wear today -- Kano hadn't invented the judogi (Judo uniform) yet, and his students were still practicing in kimono. They were the wide obi still worn with formal kimono. In ...


5

I get severe problems with my back and joints. For example, I was training rigorously five to six times a week for about five months while preparing for a grading test. Immediately after, I went on a relaxing holiday, where I spent most of the time in stationary position. A week into my holiday, I got serious problems with my back – as in, I couldn't walk or ...


3

Kyokushin has a lot more focus on hard sparring. As Dave writes in his answer, for tournaments, Shotokan fights are usually stopped after a successful technique lands (much like fencing), while Kyokushin fights are only stopped when the technique is effective (i.e. the opponent is either knocked out or knocked down). Knockouts are common in Kyokushin, ...


3

Kyokushin sparring rules are almost always continuous and full-contact, with nearly the entire body as a target except that one cannot punch to the head. I've heard that some Kyokushin schools and offshoots incorporate boxing gloves and face punching. Generally, "full contact" sparring means "medium to hard contact" in class, titrated to one's partner's ...


3

The Kyokushin-kan Australia website has this diagram of Tensho:


3

In our dojo this is what we do for the Shotokan black belt exam (1st dan): We i.e. each student, does 15 different Kihon (or combination) that have been extracted from one of the katas used in the exam. In our dojo it is customary to choose one of the upper katas of this exam to extract the kihon. Typically it is Bassai dai. Each kihon is repeated 5 times. ...


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


3

One generally becomes less flexible and of lesser endurance, and loses strength, when stopping a rigorous workout regimen. Reaction times increase as well. If an athlete stops doing the work that makes them an athlete, they will lose the attributes that mark them as an athlete. It is likely that your friend, by not working out or by working out less than ...


2

Century Martial Arts advertises their smallest bamboo toothpick starting at 12 oz. That would be the 50" (4' 2") variety. The lightest fiberglass I could find in a non-exhaustive search was still 1 lb. 5 oz. If that's too heavy, the student should train so it is not too heavy. Lifting weights with proper form and properly trained supervision can be a safe ...


2

PNF is great! I started using it about 10 years ago and it has done wonders for me and some students. It is tough to show this method to students in class to most as there are different skill levels, and sometimes a new student or two. I try to incorporate this into my karate program as well as yoga poses in the beginning and at the end. I also use straps ...


2

If Hangetsu is really similar to the Seisan I know, it is indeed a kata traditionally performed with a lot of tension. Most of the tension should be in your core however, as if you were preparing to get punched and wanted to reduce the damage. While your arms should be tensed, they shouldn't be as tense as your abdominal muscles. One of the goal of seisan is ...


2

There are many possible causes for this roadblock to your stretching improvement. Firstly, I would recommend a stretching program, not just a drill, that you do regularly outside of class several times a week. Tom Kurz book Stretching Scientifically can help with that. The key is to use effective stretching tools beyond static, passive stretches. Secondly, ...


2

When I first started training, I was expected to learn about the history of Karate and answer questions regarding the colours and symbols of our uniforms. One such question was: "Why is our gi white?" I believe that what I was taught goes well with what a previous poster stated: "The white uniform represented the values of purity, avoidance of ego, and ...


1

After having done a little research on Tensho, I'm fairly certain that anything printed will not be useful without a massive amount of knowledge. To that end, I'd rather point you towards Higaonna-sensei's performance of Tensho. In addition, this video about a two-person drill on Tensho is rather informative as far as what kind of energy/direction you are ...


1

In my own experience, dynamic stretching is really effective for kicking flexibility. For kicking, you need a dynamic motion in your limbs and joints, so that is what you practice. For example, rest a hand against the wall for balance, and do leg swings. Keep your leg straight, relax your muscles and lift it up until you feel a stretch, for a number of ...


1

Isshin Ryu Sesan. The opening move bunkai is generally accepted as a heavy double forearm drop onto the forearms of the attacker who is holding the shirt front/lapels.This,with a forward step should cause a slight dip in the attackers posture - at which point you strike them.The heaviness of the impact on the arms is referred to as muchimi and is a feeling ...



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