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8

I have been in TKD and Martial arts for over 40 years. I have a master rank in TKD. I also have a traumatic brain injury. This happens very seldom but the head gear in any sport does not protect you from concussion as the violent movement of the head causes the injury. I learned a long time ago to move my head away from a punch or kick. This minimizes the ...


8

From the origin of belts and gis themselves: Kano apparently began the custom of having his yudansha wear black obi (belts) in 1886. These obi weren't the belts karateka and judoka wear today -- Kano hadn't invented the judogi (Judo uniform) yet, and his students were still practicing in kimono. They were the wide obi still worn with formal kimono. In ...


7

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


5

If your preference is full-contact sparring, then Shotokan sucks and Kyokushin rocks, because Shotokan doesn't have full-contact sparring and Kyokushin does.


3

I've read that a chop to the throat can break the clavicle. If you break the clavicle, then if your attacker tries to swing a punch at you he won't be able to because the bone structure allowing him to will be broken. He'll also be in extreme pain as soon as he does. A chop to the throat, if done correctly, can also damage the throat but more importantly ...


3

I agree with Juann Strauss's reply. But just to add my 2 cents... When martial arts is the center focus of your life, you'll find yourself constantly thinking about it. You'll be walking down the street, but doing it while being "ready" for any attack at any time. You'll be opening doors by using your whole body instead of just your arm. When nobody's ...


3

Kyokushin sparring rules are almost always continuous and full-contact, with nearly the entire body as a target except that one cannot punch to the head. I've heard that some Kyokushin schools and offshoots incorporate boxing gloves and face punching. Generally, "full contact" sparring means "medium to hard contact" in class, titrated to one's partner's ...


3

They've actually covered parts of this on the Skeptics SE. Short version, the reduced surface area of the chop lends itself to severely damaging the vertebrae and/or severing the spinal cord through impact. Within the movies, chops were used primarily because it was exotic-looking and it indicated a clear use of eastern martial arts compared to striking the ...


3

In our dojo this is what we do for the Shotokan black belt exam (1st dan): We i.e. each student, does 15 different Kihon (or combination) that have been extracted from one of the katas used in the exam. In our dojo it is customary to choose one of the upper katas of this exam to extract the kihon. Typically it is Bassai dai. Each kihon is repeated 5 times. ...


3

When I first started training, I was expected to learn about the history of Karate and answer questions regarding the colours and symbols of our uniforms. One such question was: "Why is our gi white?" I believe that what I was taught goes well with what a previous poster stated: "The white uniform represented the values of purity, avoidance of ego, and ...


3

Kyokushin has a lot more focus on hard sparring. As Dave writes in his answer, for tournaments, Shotokan fights are usually stopped after a successful technique lands (much like fencing), while Kyokushin fights are only stopped when the technique is effective (i.e. the opponent is either knocked out or knocked down). Knockouts are common in Kyokushin, ...


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


2

There are many possible causes for this roadblock to your stretching improvement. Firstly, I would recommend a stretching program, not just a drill, that you do regularly outside of class several times a week. Tom Kurz book Stretching Scientifically can help with that. The key is to use effective stretching tools beyond static, passive stretches. Secondly, ...


2

The only Olympic combat sports are freestyle wrestling, Greco-Roman wrestling, Tae Kwon Do, judo, and boxing. If bushi ban prepared you for one of those then you could compete in the Olympics, but that is extremely unlikely.


2

A chop to the neck can damage the blood vessels (e.g. carotid artery or jugular vein), the airway (e.g. trachea), or the cervical spine. A hit to the neck can also transmit kinetic energy into the spinal column. All of these are potentially lethal. Strikes to the back of the neck, or at the base of the skull, are especially dangerous. The nearby tissue is ...


2

Kyukushin is fantastic. It's useful to remember that Karate becomes your life when your life revolves around karate. It's no more zen than that. I know things sound pretty profound and mystical when it's translated from Chinese or Japanese, but it's pretty mundane actually. Karate is life just as drag racing or trainspotting is life if you devote all your ...


2

If Hangetsu is really similar to the Seisan I know, it is indeed a kata traditionally performed with a lot of tension. Most of the tension should be in your core however, as if you were preparing to get punched and wanted to reduce the damage. While your arms should be tensed, they shouldn't be as tense as your abdominal muscles. One of the goal of seisan is ...


1

Isshin Ryu Sesan. The opening move bunkai is generally accepted as a heavy double forearm drop onto the forearms of the attacker who is holding the shirt front/lapels.This,with a forward step should cause a slight dip in the attackers posture - at which point you strike them.The heaviness of the impact on the arms is referred to as muchimi and is a feeling ...


1

At our school, the combinations go 6 & 7, 3 & 5, 2 & 18, 4 & 8, 9 & 12, 10 & 14, 15 & 26, 11 & 17, and that is all the way through green with a brown stripe (right before brown belt).



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