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13

So for those that don't know, "Dai Sempai" is a kind of rank or recognition that is given to the head student in the class. This is typically the student with the highest rank who has spent the most amount of time at that school than any other student who might have the same rank. They often lead classes through basic exercises and drills and act as an ...


12

First, about children's ranks vs. adult's ranks... Child black-belts are not uncommon in the world of Karate and Taekwondo. But when there are child black-belts, they are generally awarded that rank in the "children's" rankings. This rank is not generally the same as an adult black-belt. At least in most schools. In some schools, there's no distinction ...


7

Karate Pros More techniques = more options Actually addresses self-defense as a concern. May contain scenarios specifically geared toward self defense situations. Depends on school. Ask. Cons More techniques = less time spent training each technique. Tends to emphasize fitness less than boxing. This varies from school to school. Ask/Observe a ...


7

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


5

He told all of us who had been promoted to make sure all of the students referred to each other using the correct title... Then you probably feel obliged to make some actual effort to encourage this, and not just ignore it as Steve's suggesting... ;-o. So, my advice focuses on how to do this in the best way possible.... I suppose the students in ...


5

Kyokushin has a lot more focus on hard sparring. As Dave writes in his answer, for tournaments, Shotokan fights are usually stopped after a successful technique lands (much like fencing), while Kyokushin fights are only stopped when the technique is effective (i.e. the opponent is either knocked out or knocked down). Knockouts are common in Kyokushin, ...


4

First of all, I think you can shop around in your local area and try to find schools that share your mindset. Chances are there are some. You just have to talk with the instructors and see what the classes are like. I'm not exactly sure how karate has changed over the years to become more violent, as you noticed. To me, it looks like it hasn't changed at ...


3

You should do basic strength training using progressive overload, at a slower rate than someone who is not simultaneously working hard at karate. After you've built a base of strength through weight training, you should add some explosive movements so you can utilize your newfound strength to produce speed and power. Basically, this means you should do ...


3

Suddenly we are told we can't do that As mentioned by Wudang Kid, whaaaatt??!!! Nobody - absolutely nobody - can tell you to not practice any specific kata etc. Even if you are practicing a specialised form that someone has protected as their intellectual property, the most they can do is stop you from teaching it to others (i.e. they can stop you from ...


3

When I first started training, I was expected to learn about the history of Karate and answer questions regarding the colours and symbols of our uniforms. One such question was: "Why is our gi white?" I believe that what I was taught goes well with what a previous poster stated: "The white uniform represented the values of purity, avoidance of ego, and ...


3

They've actually covered parts of this on the Skeptics SE. Short version, the reduced surface area of the chop lends itself to severely damaging the vertebrae and/or severing the spinal cord through impact. Within the movies, chops were used primarily because it was exotic-looking and it indicated a clear use of eastern martial arts compared to striking the ...


3

I'm a Taekwondo instructor and I would disagree with your premise that "Karate style uses the balls of the feet to hit, by pulling the toes back, whereas the Tae-kwon-do’s style is by using the instep of the foot". We often use the ball of the foot, particularly when hitting something hard like bricks or boards. However, against soft targets such as the ...


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


3

I've read that a chop to the throat can break the clavicle. If you break the clavicle, then if your attacker tries to swing a punch at you he won't be able to because the bone structure allowing him to will be broken. He'll also be in extreme pain as soon as he does. A chop to the throat, if done correctly, can also damage the throat but more importantly ...


3

I agree with Juann Strauss's reply. But just to add my 2 cents... When martial arts is the center focus of your life, you'll find yourself constantly thinking about it. You'll be walking down the street, but doing it while being "ready" for any attack at any time. You'll be opening doors by using your whole body instead of just your arm. When nobody's ...


2

Kyukushin is fantastic. It's useful to remember that Karate becomes your life when your life revolves around karate. It's no more zen than that. I know things sound pretty profound and mystical when it's translated from Chinese or Japanese, but it's pretty mundane actually. Karate is life just as drag racing or trainspotting is life if you devote all your ...


2

If Hangetsu is really similar to the Seisan I know, it is indeed a kata traditionally performed with a lot of tension. Most of the tension should be in your core however, as if you were preparing to get punched and wanted to reduce the damage. While your arms should be tensed, they shouldn't be as tense as your abdominal muscles. One of the goal of seisan is ...


2

There are many possible causes for this roadblock to your stretching improvement. Firstly, I would recommend a stretching program, not just a drill, that you do regularly outside of class several times a week. Tom Kurz book Stretching Scientifically can help with that. The key is to use effective stretching tools beyond static, passive stretches. Secondly, ...


2

I've been training in Kyokushin for 15 years and yeah, if you like hard sparing you'll get you hands full. We still do some kata too as Kyokushin karate is based on Shotokan Karate, but they are waaayyy les pretty that the Shotokan one's. Still, don't forget that Kata training is an important part in the pratice of Kyokushin, even if Kyokushin focuses ...


2

A chop to the neck can damage the blood vessels (e.g. carotid artery or jugular vein), the airway (e.g. trachea), or the cervical spine. A hit to the neck can also transmit kinetic energy into the spinal column. All of these are potentially lethal. Strikes to the back of the neck, or at the base of the skull, are especially dangerous. The nearby tissue is ...


2

Dave gave a great answer. I would add for speed training : you can practice your techniques (punching and kicking) shadow boxing with light weights in you hands. Say 3-5 pounds. Don't forget to never fully extend your arms and legs when trainign with weights So you can do a couple of rounds of : one round shadow boxing with weights and then one round ...


1

As far as styles "geared for" older people, I don't know any. I do not believe Tai Chi was created for old people specifically. But there are styles that older people can do, which is not to say they will do them better than a younger, more athletic person. AIKIDO Sounds like you want an internal martial art but dislike the flavor of Chinese martial ...


1

I was way more relaxed when it came to using titles. My students called me by my first name ( wasn't much older than most of them). I felt that they needed to learn to respect me for what I could do and teach them to do, rather than my title. HOWEVER, I have absolutely no problem with schools that are more formal. To answer the question: The first thing to ...


1

Over the years, I've met a number of very skilled and very unassuming martial artists. We could share a meal, a beer, and some laughs, but I could also maintain proper respect in addressing them by their title. For me, it was a non-issue. You just do it. They've earned it, so I respect it. When someone was promoted to a level that now warranted a new title, ...


1

At my dojo we do not use first names. I would be called Mr. Lee by other adults, and Senpai Lee by all the youth. Perhaps your dojo does the same thing. In my opinion having a more professional naming system used by everyone all the time would help make title changes easier. Another thing that we do is bow to each other when we say each other's name. As a ...


1

I've been trainging in Kyokushin Karate for 15 years now and what I've learned the most, is that even if you master your art, self awareness is always the first thing that will get you out of a situation that can turn bad. It's always better to avoid the situation than to be forced to deal with it. Don't forget : adrenaline rush, stress and other factors ...


1

I am going to attract flak for this statement, but I stand behind it nonetheless: Taekwondo's kicks are not only different from their Karate counterparts, they are also superior in every sense: they are faster they strike harder/are more devastating they have more reach their initial movements are harder for your opponent to tell apart The only critique ...


1

Isshin Ryu Sesan. The opening move bunkai is generally accepted as a heavy double forearm drop onto the forearms of the attacker who is holding the shirt front/lapels.This,with a forward step should cause a slight dip in the attackers posture - at which point you strike them.The heaviness of the impact on the arms is referred to as muchimi and is a feeling ...



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