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14

First, about children's ranks vs. adult's ranks... Child black-belts are not uncommon in the world of Karate and Taekwondo. But when there are child black-belts, they are generally awarded that rank in the "children's" rankings. This rank is not generally the same as an adult black-belt. At least in most schools. In some schools, there's no distinction ...


13

So for those that don't know, "Dai Sempai" is a kind of rank or recognition that is given to the head student in the class. This is typically the student with the highest rank who has spent the most amount of time at that school than any other student who might have the same rank. They often lead classes through basic exercises and drills and act as an ...


12

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


10

I'll second some of the responses here and say that unless you're gifted, you probably won't be able to avoid confusing Kyokushin with Taekwondo. The stances, the techniques, the level of force, what counts as "legal" or "illegal" contact, etc. will all be different enough that it will drive your instructors crazy trying to correct you all the time. You're ...


8

Disclaimer: I've spent too much time over thinking the differences between Japanese and Chinese martial arts To quote Bruce Lee's opinion on the styles, getting hit by a Karate punch is like getting hit by a crowbar, while getting hit by a Kung Fu punch is like getting hit by a ball on a chain. Both hurt. You don't want to be on the receiving end of ...


7

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


7

Karate Pros More techniques = more options Actually addresses self-defense as a concern. May contain scenarios specifically geared toward self defense situations. Depends on school. Ask. Cons More techniques = less time spent training each technique. Tends to emphasize fitness less than boxing. This varies from school to school. Ask/Observe a ...


7

What is the most effective method for the roundhouse kick? You've got a one-adjective criteria there, and a vague one: effective. Overall effectiveness might reasonably be defined as what helps you win reliably, or perhaps you'd prefer something less reliable if it meant the average or median injury you sustain is less even though the worst case ...


6

1) What physical difficulties may arise from learning both arts at same time ? The techniques are different, so you'll confuse your "muscle memory". For instance, TKD's rising block is at a 45 degree angle. Kyukushin has it flat. TKD allows you to punch to the head (not the face though), Kyukushin absolutely does not. You'll be tempted to, which will ...


6

Quite simply, you are no longer transferring power once the kick has landed. Therefore it is pointless to leave the leg out there - unless you are either posing or looking to burn a bit more energy. I would always advise to retract the leg as soon as practical. If someone left a kick hanging out I would gladly catch it and use it to my advantage. The same ...


5

Asking for a strategy upfront is not going to be beneficial, especially on the internet - we have never met this opponent so all we know is he's bigger and stronger than you (and we have no idea how big you are). Train hard. Be confident in your knowledge and capabilities. You should start learning to read your opponents - it's an important skill to have, ...


5

You should do basic strength training using progressive overload, at a slower rate than someone who is not simultaneously working hard at karate. After you've built a base of strength through weight training, you should add some explosive movements so you can utilize your newfound strength to produce speed and power. Basically, this means you should do ...


5

He told all of us who had been promoted to make sure all of the students referred to each other using the correct title... Then you probably feel obliged to make some actual effort to encourage this, and not just ignore it as Steve's suggesting... ;-o. So, my advice focuses on how to do this in the best way possible.... I suppose the students in ...


4

First of all, I think you can shop around in your local area and try to find schools that share your mindset. Chances are there are some. You just have to talk with the instructors and see what the classes are like. I'm not exactly sure how karate has changed over the years to become more violent, as you noticed. To me, it looks like it hasn't changed at ...


4

I'm a Taekwondo instructor and I would disagree with your premise that "Karate style uses the balls of the feet to hit, by pulling the toes back, whereas the Tae-kwon-do’s style is by using the instep of the foot". We often use the ball of the foot, particularly when hitting something hard like bricks or boards. However, against soft targets such as the ...


4

My advice whenever you're facing either someone who's more advanced or bigger is to concentrate on your basic, "high percentage" techniques and be as precise and as quick as you can. Stick to things you know well, and avoid any temptation to do something "cool" or something you've just recently learned. In another answer, I discussed what "high percentage" ...


4

I teach Kyokushin karate and I've taught the many different ways a roundhouse kick can be executed. However these can be boiled by 2 different characteristics: the striking area (i.e. Ball of feet, instep and lower shin) and the power mechanics. With power mechanics there are 3 distinct forms: 1st the TKD style where the leg is brought up vertically like ...


4

The sensei has modified the 'official' katas of the style. She 'mixed' some parts of pinan shodan, with pinan nidan and so. That's pretty worrying. It's not uncommon for schools to have slightly different "interpretations" of the same gross movement (e.g. one to say something's a block while another says it's a strike - but the limbs are moving in ...


3

Suddenly we are told we can't do that As mentioned by Wudang Kid, whaaaatt??!!! Nobody - absolutely nobody - can tell you to not practice any specific kata etc. Even if you are practicing a specialised form that someone has protected as their intellectual property, the most they can do is stop you from teaching it to others (i.e. they can stop you from ...


3

I've read that a chop to the throat can break the clavicle. If you break the clavicle, then if your attacker tries to swing a punch at you he won't be able to because the bone structure allowing him to will be broken. He'll also be in extreme pain as soon as he does. A chop to the throat, if done correctly, can also damage the throat but more importantly ...


3

They've actually covered parts of this on the Skeptics SE. Short version, the reduced surface area of the chop lends itself to severely damaging the vertebrae and/or severing the spinal cord through impact. Within the movies, chops were used primarily because it was exotic-looking and it indicated a clear use of eastern martial arts compared to striking the ...


3

What Dave said. Just pitching in to say i had the same problem. After years of boxing/thai boxing i developed a bit of a "monkey slouch" as well. Boxing classes usually contain a lot of push-ups and crunches and the stance is a little hunched. What helped me was a) actively trying not to slouch, b) diversifying my training and c) adding more exercises for ...


3

There's truth to both sides - it's a spectrum. You want to commit more and hit harder when you believe you're going to make meaningful contact and - with the impact factored in - the opponent won't be able to exploit your slower recovery time. If you're wrong, and the opponent slips or comfortably weathers the attack and counters, you'll be in a worse ...


3

It all depends on you honestly, she might have her reasons for asking for advance. Since these days, martial arts training centers are like in every other block (at least where l live). And its quite natural for somebody who have that much experience to mix different styles. My sensei is a 5 dan aikidoka and also have a black belt in arnis, so often time I ...


3

Just looking at the negatives... 守破離 (Shuhari) is a common concept in Japanese martial arts: to obey (守/shu) , to digress (破/ha), and to leave (離/ri) any style. It might be that said sensei is in the 破 (or digress) stage of her progression. It might be hubris but that is hard to gauge on your information alone. This could explain her "bad mouthing" other ...


3

If you like the Dojo - if the schedule is convenient, teacher is good and people are nice, join the group. It is better to join a Dojo than not. Do not worry too much about the "purity" of the style. As long as whatever is being taught in the Dojo makes sense and as long as you learn and progress, practicing always beats not practicing.


2

A chop to the neck can damage the blood vessels (e.g. carotid artery or jugular vein), the airway (e.g. trachea), or the cervical spine. A hit to the neck can also transmit kinetic energy into the spinal column. All of these are potentially lethal. Strikes to the back of the neck, or at the base of the skull, are especially dangerous. The nearby tissue is ...


2

I've been training in Kyokushin for 15 years and yeah, if you like hard sparing you'll get you hands full. We still do some kata too as Kyokushin karate is based on Shotokan Karate, but they are waaayyy les pretty that the Shotokan one's. Still, don't forget that Kata training is an important part in the pratice of Kyokushin, even if Kyokushin focuses ...


2

Forgive me for my input here. 45 years ago when I started my training and was wrestling with the same issues, my Sensei took me aside and taught, Spend 2 hours on speed drills for every hour spent on weights. Weight training makes you powerful but slow. To increase speed do the following: A. Candles punches, stop 5" or 1 fist width short; kicks for at ...


2

Dave gave a great answer. I would add for speed training : you can practice your techniques (punching and kicking) shadow boxing with light weights in you hands. Say 3-5 pounds. Don't forget to never fully extend your arms and legs when trainign with weights So you can do a couple of rounds of : one round shadow boxing with weights and then one round ...



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