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Don't be dogmatic. In the end, the aim is to transfer energy of your kick into your target (may it be a person or a punching bag). Once the kick (or a punch as a matter of fact) has been delivered, there is no reason to keep the foot (or hand) there. In fact, when fighting an opponent bound on kicking your ass, it can be outright dangerous. Given ...


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It depends on what you're trying to do with the technique. A straight punch, hook, cross, uppercut, and any number of spinning and pushing kicks don't retract on impact. Jabs and snapping kicks do too. Karate has a decent mix of all these things. Taekwondo too. You can't use only one set of techniques or the other.


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My master also emphasizes retracting attacks so that the enemy will not be able to grab your arm. In a strike, the most important part is the impact, I think. After the impact, it is all just simple push, and a push does very minimal damage, if any. The impact is what makes muscles sore, or break bones. But, some attacks are not really intended to be ...


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Disclaimer: I've spent too much time over thinking the differences between Japanese and Chinese martial arts To quote Bruce Lee's opinion on the styles, getting hit by a Karate punch is like getting hit by a crowbar, while getting hit by a Kung Fu punch is like getting hit by a ball on a chain. Both hurt. You don't want to be on the receiving end of ...


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There's truth to both sides - it's a spectrum. You want to commit more and hit harder when you believe you're going to make meaningful contact and - with the impact factored in - the opponent won't be able to exploit your slower recovery time. If you're wrong, and the opponent slips or comfortably weathers the attack and counters, you'll be in a worse ...


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Quite simply, you are no longer transferring power once the kick has landed. Therefore it is pointless to leave the leg out there - unless you are either posing or looking to burn a bit more energy. I would always advise to retract the leg as soon as practical. If someone left a kick hanging out I would gladly catch it and use it to my advantage. The same ...


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What Dave said. Just pitching in to say i had the same problem. After years of boxing/thai boxing i developed a bit of a "monkey slouch" as well. Boxing classes usually contain a lot of push-ups and crunches and the stance is a little hunched. What helped me was a) actively trying not to slouch, b) diversifying my training and c) adding more exercises for ...


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I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...



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