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11

Truthfully there are three: iaido, kendo, and battou-do. They differ on their focus or in their origination. iaido. The art of sword drawing. All katas begin and end with the sword sheathed. In some ways you could liken it to preparedness at all times, not just in battle. kendo. The art of of sword fighting. In modern kendo, there is an emphasis on ...


9

Kenjutsu is the skill of using the sword, divided into various styles by ryuha (roughly, "schools"). This can include skills such as drawing (iai) or engaging (battou), as well the disarming of an armed opponent (shinken shirahadome or muto dori). Generally (though certainly not in all cases), kenjutsu is one component of a greater curriculum within a ryuha ...


8

Without knowing what your goals are for getting into shape, or how you intend to get back into kendo, all I can do is comment on how I approached getting back into karate. I had a lengthy layoff from karate (about 2 years) due to issues with psoriasis on the soles of my feet. What I didn't know at the time is that the intensity of the psoriasis was related ...


4

To clarify a couple of points in other answers: Weight: lighter bokken feel rather different to a katana. As already noted, you can do techniques with a kendo shinai that are not possible with a katana unless you are Conan the Barbarian! This is due to the light weight of the shinai vs a katana. A heavier bokken will be closer to the weight of a katana and ...


4

The main difference between the two is that Kendo is a competitive sport, whereas Iaido is more of a traditional art. Since Iaidokas often practice without a real opponent (katas) they don't use any protective gear. Iaido beginners usually start with wooden swords and then progress up to blunt metal blades (intermediate), and then to sharp blades (only very ...


4

Generally, there are a few points in which the sword will differ between arts. The history and mythology (or oral tradition) of the evolution of the Japanese sword (from ken or tsurugi to tachi to katana) spans thousands of years. Generally, differences may be caused by: Locality – The available material sources at the time may have led to a design out of ...


4

Your question may be answered more generically as thus: What is the difference between -do and -jutsu? (with the exception of judo and jujutsu) -Jutsu, grossly, means 'technique'. It means something applicable, practical, extremely concerned with getting results. -Do, grossly, means 'path'. It has much stronger ties to a lot of other aspects of life, ...


2

Why prepare at all? If you want to be in shape to chop firewood, chop firewood. Runners run; Baseball players play baseball; and kendoka practice kendo. Whatever you do, your body will adapt. This is marginally true, but misleading. Runners and baseball players lift and work on conditioning, too. Judoka, karateka, and kendoka even have a name for it: ...


2

Bokken are both training tools and weapons in their own right. The suburi bokken comes from the legend of Musashi. As the story goes, he was crossing a river on a boat to go to the duel of his life when he realized he didn't have his katana. He fashioned one of the oars into a sword. It was heavy, but Musashi was well renowned for his strength. He, of ...


2

I believe that the Trials of the Shattered Shaft is what you are looking for. However, there's some risks in attempting it. Maybe you should talk to Urahara?


1

Care and cleaning of your bogu varies depending on what the actual damage is. Given the surface of the do is generally bamboo with lacquer over it, you essentially wind up with three sorts of stains. First, and the usual item with white marks, is salt from sweat. But that usually gets cleaned off readily with a wet towel, so the odds are good that that's not ...


1

Swords come in different shapes and sizes. Bokken, to represent them as facsimile, should follow. This is sufficient explanation for variation in curvature, thickness, edging, grooves, or any other variables. In addition, different styles demand different weights, shapes and styles for their bokken due to personal or organizational preferences that are ...


1

If you are already an experienced Kendoka, getting in shape would basically be Jogging / Circuit Training Weight training Suburi I do participate in tournaments and often during busier months, I stop training (max 3 months). Getting stamina back is usually the main focus for me when coming back. I would get the scolding of the century if I were not ...



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