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Kenjutsu is the skill of using the sword, divided into various styles by ryuha (roughly, "schools"). This can include skills such as drawing (iai) or engaging (battou), as well the disarming of an armed opponent (shinken shirahadome or muto dori). Generally (though certainly not in all cases), kenjutsu is one component of a greater curriculum within a ryuha ...


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You're asking a lot of interconnecting but separate questions. Depending upon the view and the school, you will generally get different answers, but in Mikkyo (Esoteric Buddhism), these concepts (Fudōshin, Mushin, and Zanshin) are all derived from the teachings of Fudō Myō-ō. There is an order to these things, as I was taught it, so I will answer in that ...


4

Your question may be answered more generically as thus: What is the difference between -do and -jutsu? (with the exception of judo and jujutsu) -Jutsu, grossly, means 'technique'. It means something applicable, practical, extremely concerned with getting results. -Do, grossly, means 'path'. It has much stronger ties to a lot of other aspects of life, ...


4

Generally, there are a few points in which the sword will differ between arts. The history and mythology (or oral tradition) of the evolution of the Japanese sword (from ken or tsurugi to tachi to katana) spans thousands of years. Generally, differences may be caused by: Locality – The available material sources at the time may have led to a design out of ...


4

To clarify a couple of points in other answers: Weight: lighter bokken feel rather different to a katana. As already noted, you can do techniques with a kendo shinai that are not possible with a katana unless you are Conan the Barbarian! This is due to the light weight of the shinai vs a katana. A heavier bokken will be closer to the weight of a katana and ...


2

Bokken are both training tools and weapons in their own right. The suburi bokken comes from the legend of Musashi. As the story goes, he was crossing a river on a boat to go to the duel of his life when he realized he didn't have his katana. He fashioned one of the oars into a sword. It was heavy, but Musashi was well renowned for his strength. He, of ...


1

Swords come in different shapes and sizes. Bokken, to represent them as facsimile, should follow. This is sufficient explanation for variation in curvature, thickness, edging, grooves, or any other variables. In addition, different styles demand different weights, shapes and styles for their bokken due to personal or organizational preferences that are ...



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