Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Everything that's physically challenging carries the chance of injury. Deal with it. Running risks joint degeneration. Bicycling can be bad for sexual function and mobility. Hikers get lost and freeze to death. Tennis causes elbow pain. Soccer players blow out their knees. Baseball players risk concussions from wayward pitches to the head. Lifting weights ...


16

I don't think the science is settled to a degree where we can give a solid answer, or make too many specific conclusions. Disclaimer: I'm not a kickboxer, and I haven't studied the subject deeply. Dementia pugilistica Getting hit in the head is not good for your brain. Getting hit a lot in the head is very bad for your brain. That's true regardless of ...


11

Footwork is not just about moving in the right directions, it's also about getting there quickly and being in balance as you do it. Footwork will be no good to you if you are a lumbering elephant with no balance or dexterity. A couple of ways to get lighter on your feet are: skipping. While used extensively in boxing for fitness, it also teaches you to ...


9

To be honest this is a tough question to answer because there is no one right answer or technique for this. It is healthy to be scared in a match. If you are not scared then you are either highly experienced or somewhat mental. I think the only way to overcome this (without some hypnotic reprogramming) is experience - which means getting hit. Overcoming ...


8

Icing reduces swelling. That is the only reason to ice as far as I know. Swelling can inhibit the motion of joints and make the injury more painful. It may also take a long time to reduce back to normal levels. Icing is effective up to about 48 hours after the injury occurred. Basically, if it keeps swelling, then icing it will continue to help stop that ...


7

I'd say that doesn't sound like a footwork issue, but rather like a problem of timing and distance. If you jab and your opponent has time to counter with a side kick then you are to far away. Try to work out your exact range for the different types of techniques (using a heavy bag or any other target, or just a wall if you don't have equipment. Don't ...


7

This reminds me of a training technique my old track and field trainer sometimes used for condition training. If you get short(er) breaks then you'll be forced to run (or in this case fight) while you are more fatigued than usual which indeed is good for condition training. It will also teach you to "keep up" your coordination and technique while ...


7

"Wide or deep"? is a classical question in a lot of different domains, and I think the answer depends largely on what your goals are and how you define "expert." You will generally have some set of base techniques–usually but not always from a single style–that you will learn to instinctively fall back on under times of stress, but this doesn't preclude ...


7

One of the eternal truths about martial arts is that you're going to get hit. And another eternal truth is that sometimes you're going to get hit hard. So it's a good thing to learn to take hits. Being struck in the belly is a good way to learn to tighten the abs and discover that they are an effective shield when they are properly developed and trained. A ...


6

The main thing to understand is that your are in charge of how you train. So if you would like to train light contact, or no contact at all, you should be able to. If your club does not respect that, they are not worthy: Martial Arts nowadays is not as it used to be in terms of need. We need it less for warfare and more for self-defence. As different people ...


6

Visit a couple of dojos that interest you and ask about their injury record. Look for older students; once you cross 50, injuries count more and heal slower. Moreover you're more likely to have other injuries that complicate your practice. Ask about training with injuries, and "opt-out". I can no longer do kneeling work, and when I visit a new dojo I ...


6

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


6

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


5

The biggest risk with concussions is getting a second one shortly after the first. For competetive boxers and kickboxers, this means the 10 count and standing 8 count are sentencing them to long term brain damage. If you're training casually, wearing very good headgear (Winning FG-2900 if you can afford it, Rival d3o would seem to be a good second choice) ...


5

I concur with the previous answers - punching an immoveable surface is bad unless your knuckles and wrists are already conditioned. For example I frequently do single-knuckle strikes on doorway framings - while I do it considerably harder than the normal person I still don't do it with anything near the power I would use on a soft target. I would strongly ...


5

At a good gym, meaning experienced coaches and decent equipment, boxing/kick-boxing should not be that dangerous. First of all, you're probably not sparring right away, and once you are its in a controlled environment with mouthpieces, headgear, gloves, and shinpads(if kickboxing). As pointed out in a previous answer, you are probably at an increased risk ...


5

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


4

I'm not sure that your statement about the safety of boxing is generally accepted. "There is absolutely no way you can make boxing safe," said Nelson Richards, MD, a delegate from the American Academy of Neurology who proposed the original resolution to ban the sport in 1983. The BBC reported According to brain surgeons, over 80 per cent of ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


3

It's not good for your body. It's also not good in general for your mental development. Walls and people don't move the same way. People yield* when they get hit. Walls do not. Attach heavy pillows to the wall with velcro or glue or nails or something. Then punch those instead. It's a start, until you find something better to punch. YIELDING - the ...


3

The things that help for me, or maybe I only thought they did, were: stretching and warming up thoroughly in the morning going for walks drinking plenty of water eating lots of quality food In other words, the things we should be doing normally.


3

See a doctor. They may give you stronger pain killer and/or muscle relaxants than you can get OTC, both of which will help you to stop stressing the leg and heal faster. Aside from that stay off it as much as possible (you can walk down the aisle), go easy, keep up the ice until the swelling recedes then switch to mild heat. I didn't at first but ...


3

You need ask yourself a question: What do I want to achieve in martial arts? If you want a sport first place - injury guaranteed If you want the cultural experience - no injury If you want self-defense - depends on the system, injury might occur Usually martial arts are without contact or more usually instructors are keeping everyone safe so nothing ...


3

I've been training Karate for the last 11 years. You get hurt sometimes, accidents or clashes happen. You get over it. I've had a few injuries over the years, broken foot, hand, ribs, all from accidents. It happens. You try to learn from it (block with your hand closed!) and carry on. Our Dojo is very strict on having control, which should be a factor in ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


2

It depends on what martial art you are training for. Which one are you doing? Shortening the rest intervals is a great idea because it makes you get used to fighting with less energy, thus you get stronger and accustomed (sharper under more strain) to it. I would highly suggest doing this. Though, I would still suggest doing at least one practice a week ...


2

We got this exact question over at fitness.SE. Essentially you just get back into it a little slower, with a little less intensity (less weight on the bar, running shorter distances, sprinting a little slower). Not much special to it, except crossing your Ts and dotting your Is. Make sure the sickness is really gone and start training carefully.


2

When I just started learning martial arts (Seido) I was in the same position that you refer to. The solution for me was sparring with black belts or a kyu at least two ranks above mine. They will have the experience to be able to control their strikes so you don't get hurt too much. An added bonus is if you make a mistake while sparring you will know ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible