Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


6

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


3

The answer to your question is... it depends! What are you training in, and in what way are you training? If you're training primarily in something that has you doing forms, or very light push hands, or low force and simple touches? Your odds of injury are really low. If you're doing something that involves heavy force strikes, throws, etc. odds of ...


3

This is equivalent to boxers punching their opponents' arms: it increases muscle fatigue in later rounds. There are other uses as well, but this is the most useful effect.


3

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


3

I'm not a boxer, I have almost zero boxing experience, but I've seen several valid approaches to footwork during the jab. The two I've been shown most commonly are a Jack Dempsey-style jab with a heavy forward step and a jab with no step, pivoting the front foot on the ball of the foot. I can't speak to the jabs you've seen or the examples you describe, but ...


2

Most of what has been said so far is correct and in your question you asked about reducing the impact. This is also a big factor. If your leg can move when hit, the impact is greatly reduced. If your foot is planted then you absorb the full force. This also places a large side load on your knee. Our legs are designed to take hits from the front, that is why ...


2

Honestly, it is a choice between getting kicked in the flesh where I get hurt but the guy who kicked me didn't and checking so we both suffer pain. Once I check, he might be less inclined to throw another hard kick, because it hurts him just as much.


2

I think that the reason that the checker receives less pain than the kicker is because of what part of the shin the checker uses to block the kick. The checker uses the upper part of the shin, close to the knee. The kicker uses the lower part of the shin, close to the foot. Due to the great thickness (or density, I'm not sure) of the upper shin, I think ...


2

Make sure you are actually landing the kick with your shin and not your instep, even when wearing protection. This technique done poorly without instep protection can damage your foot. I lost nearly half a year of training after one match of a dozen sloppy kicks.


2

It is natural and expected to be tired and less precise towards the end of a ninety minute hard muay Thai class. There might be specific ways in which the instructor could run the class more optimally from a sports-science standpoint, but you should simply try to do the class as prescribed without taking extra breaks. (I could be more specific if you gave ...


2

Try to kick a little wider and hit with your shin, unbalance them right as they step down on a jab for example. You can disrupt their balance with this kick. A few good ones will hurt their leg, even in sparring with shinpads on. You can attack with it; use it to set up strikes to the head, or you can counter his advance with it as he jabs in; it ruins the ...


2

What Is A Bruise A bruise is a rupturing of the capillaries under the skin which causes blood to pool in the adjacent tissues. Swelling and increased pressure from the bleeding causes the firing of nerve endings in the area, which the brain translates as pain. Treating a Bruise Bruising heals in accordance with the severity of the damage to the tissues, ...


1

Just as you have mentioned in your question I have noticed when I check a kick that the point of impact and the actual stoping point of the kick are far enough apart to allow a bit of dissipation of power from the kick You are also stoping the kick before full power can be reached. It is like the monk who throws his stomach into the punch then allows ...


1

In Boxing... Western Boxing the "popper" way to stand for a jab is as follows Jab hand being the forehand or the side closest to your opponent. Generally this is your weak side. If you are right handed then the power hand being your right hand is in the back with your left out front. keep your hands up in a defensive/protective fashion IE keep your hands ...


1

According to Bruce Lee's Tao of Jeet Kune Do, the jab—which he called "The Leading Straight Punch" should be delivered with the fist but not generated from it adding other parts of the body. All subsequent quotes are from the book the Tools —> Striking section The Stance When you are standing right foot forward, your right punch and right leg become ...


1

It depends on your level of intensity. 90 minutes is a long time to go without a break. Lots of short 30 second to 1 minute breaks throughout training are normally more effective. After an hour of doing anything intensive, the body normally requires intake of food e.g. carb drink to replenish salt stores. If you are not resting to do even this, you will ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible